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2005 Incline Club Race Reports

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View 2006 race reports

Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon, Aug 20-21, 2005 - 78 reports
Leadville Trail 100 - Leadville, Colorado - August 20-21 2005 - 4 reports
Mt. Disapointment 50km - Angeles National Forest, Mt. Wilson CA - August 13, 2005
Deseret News Marathon - Salt Lake City, UT - July 25, 2005
Grin and Bear It - Crested Butte - July 23, 2005
Barr Trail Mountain Race - Barr Trail - July 17, 2005 - 7 reports
Tahoe Rim Trail 50 mile - Lake Tahoe, NV - July 16, 2005
Summer Round Up 12K - Stratton open space - July 10, 2005 - 9 reports
Vail Hill Climb - Vail - July 3, 2005
Leadville Trail Marathon - Leadville - July 2nd, 2005
Mt. Evans Ascent - Echo Lake, CO - June 18, 2005
Slacker Half Marathon - Loveland Ski Area - June 25, 2005
Valley of the Flowers Half-Marathon - Lompoc, CA. - June 18, 2005
The San Juan Solstice 50 Mile Run - Lake City Colorado - June 18, 2005 - 2 reports
Garden of the Gods 10 mile - Colorado Springs - June 12, 2005 - 10 reports
Holcomb Valley 33 Mile Trail Run - Big Bear CA - June 12, 2005
Badwater Ultramarathon - Death Valley, CA - June 11, 2005
Deadwood Mickelson Trail Marathon - Deadwood, SD - June 5th, 2005 - 2 reports
Casper Marathon - Casper WY - June 5, 2005
Squaw Peak 50 mile Trail Run - Orem UT - June 4, 2005
Rocky Mountain Double Marathon - Medicine Bow National Forest, Laramie, WY - May 29, 2005
Bishop High Sierra 50 miler - Bishop CA - May 21, 2005
Fargo Marathon - Fargo, North Dakota - May 14, 2005
Ft. Collins Old Town Marathon - Ft. Collins,Co. - May 8,2005 - 2 reports
Wild Wild West Marathon and 50km - Lone Pine, CA - May 7th, 2005
Collegiate Peaks Trail Run - Buena Vista - May 7, 2005 - 3 reports
Japan - May 3, 2005
Make A Wish - Denver, CO - May 1, 2005
Flying Pig Marathon - Cincinnati, OH - May 1, 2005
Delaware Trail Marathon - Newark, DE - April 30th, 2005
Shiprock Marathon - Shiprock N.M. - April 30, 2005
Rainier Classic - Mt. rainier, Eashington - April 28, 2005
Salt Lake City Marathon - Salt Lake City, UT - April 23, 2005
Spring Desert Ultra - Fruita, CO - April 23, 2005
Boston Marathon - Boston, MA - April 18, 2005 - 2 reports
Albuquerque Tricentenial 1/2 marathon - Albuquerque NM - April 16, 2005
Greenland Trail 25k/50k - Greenland exit off of I 25 - April 16, 2005 - 5 reports
Moab 25K - Moab, UT - April 15, 2005
Umstead 100 - Umstead State Park, Raleigh NC - April 2-3, 2005
28th Annual Capitol 10,000 - Austin, Texas - April 3, 2005
The Platte River Half Marathon - Littleton, CO - April 3, 2005 - 2 reports
Run to the Sun - Kahului, Hawaii (Maui) - March 26, 2005 - 2 reports
Tri-State - Utah, Arizona, finished in Mesquite Nevada - March 26, 2005 - 2 reports
Ocean Drive Marathon - Cape May, New Jersey - March 20th, 2005
Ocean Drive 10 Miler - Cape May, NJ - March 20, 2005
Queen Charlotte Classic - Marlborough Sound, South Island, New Zealand - March 19, 2005
Catalina Island Marathon - Catalina Island CA - March 19, 2005 - 2 reports
Boston’s run to remember - Boston, MA - March 13, 2005
Ironman New Zealand - March 5, 2005
Old Pueblo 50 - Sonoita AZ - March 5, 2005 - 2 reports
Mardi Gras - New Orleans, LA - February 27, 2005
Lake Hodges 50km - Lake Hodges CA - February 26, 2005
Dasani Half-Marathom - Myrtle Beach, SC - February 19, 2005
Myrtle Beach Marathon - Myrtle Beach, SC - February 19, 2005
14th Annual Austin Freescale Marathon - Austin, Texas - February 13, 2005
New World Snowshoe Championship - Luck, Wisconsin - February 12, 2005
Pemberton 50km - Fountain Hills AZ - February 6, 2005
Las Vegas International Marathon - Las Vegas, NV - January 30, 2005 - 3 reports
Florida marathon - Clearwater Fl - January 23, 2005
Calico Trail 50km - Calico, CA - January 16, 2005
33rd Annual Houston-HP Marathon - Houston, Texas - January 16, 2005
HURT 100 - Honoulu, Hawaii (sort of) - January 15-16, 2005 - 2 reports
Mississippi Marathon - Clinton, MS - January 15, 2005
Arizona Rock N Roll - Phoenix, AZ - January 9, 2004
6th Annual Texas Marathon - Kingwood, TX - January 1, 2005
Honolulu Marathon - Honolulu, HI - December 13, 04
15th Annual Sunmart Texas Trail 50 Miler - Huntsville, Texas - December 11, 2004
California International Marathon - Sacramento, California - December 5, 2004
OTHTC 50km - Ridgcrest, CA - December 5, 2004
Memphis St. Judes Marathon - Memphis TN - December 4, 2004
Rock Canyon Half Marathon - Pueblo, CO - December 4, 2004 - 4 reports
Farenheit be Darned Turkey Trot - Fairbanks, Alaska - November 29, 2004
Run To The Far Side - San Francisco - November 28, 2004
Topanga Turkey Trot - Topanga State Park, near L.A., CA - November 27, 2004
Aluminum Man Biathlon - Polo Beach, Maui - November 14, 2004
Harbor to Harbor 15K - Maui, Hawaii - November 7, 2004

View 2004 race reports


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Leadville Trail 100 - Leadville, Colorado - August 20-21 2005

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: Crew/Pace friend to under 25 hours
Results : Crewed/Paced friend to under 25 hours

General Summary:
I wish this were an uneventful race, but it was not to be. Once we checked in to the race, heard the pre-brief, checked in to our hotel, then we got the call. The child care provider for my racer called to tell my racer an emergency room visit was in order for one of his children. We made phone calls, but had to leave about 4:00 pm from Leadville to return to Colorado Springs. We got the everything taken care of and headed back to Leadville by 9:00 pm. Of course my racer was ready to throw in the towel, but I insisted we press on. Made it back to Leadville by 12:15 am. My racer and his friend toed the line at 4:00 am. I paced my racer's friend from Winfield to Fish Hatchery, at which time he quit, although I insisted he continue.

Things Done Right:
Insisted my racer toe the line and finish under 25 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not sleep before the race. Ran with a leg at 50%, although it did not injure it further, I felt a little sluggish.

Any Other Stuff:
It was good to see so many Incline Club people out on the course.

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: Pacer report
Results: paced from Winfield to Tree Line

General Summary:
Crewed and paced at the 2005 Leadville Trail 100.

Things Done Right:
I got to help with runner check in at 3 in the morning, then crewed all day for my runner. Took him from Winfield to Tree Line, and he made all the cut-offs. I was thrilled that he made it to Half Moon, as this is where so many runners call it quits. Must have been that lap dance I gave him at Twin Lakes that helped to keep him motivated.

Things Done Wrong:
I was waiting for him inside the Fish Hatchery aid station with all his water bottles and food. But he didn’t get that far. Instead he chose to drop where the guy who cuts off the bracelets was. If I had been there I would have stood between them and kicked his ass out of the aid station.

Any Other Stuff:
It was great to see Dan Jensen there having the guts to attempt such a course. Dan finally successfully completed Badwater, this with him being an amputee. And it was wonderful being at Leadville the year Matt shattered all previous course records. Way to go Matt!

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: To help Ted in any way possible
Results: To Drink Beer in the Gutter

General Summary:
Ted and his crew (Dr. Lisa, Carole and I) rented a cute little house in Leadville, a funky old PINK house not too far from the START/FINISH. we were watching for ‘particles’ Saturday night as were down wind from Hunter Thompson’s out with a bang memorial. Johnnie Depp and a few of Gonzo’s pals scattered his ashes in a fire works display on his property.

The staring gun (shotgun blast) sounded at 4:00 AM Saturday after a restless few hours of sleep, and for the next 24 hours we were out on the course and at the aid stations for Ted, taking turns pacing him over the last 50 miles. I took him up and over Hope Pass between miles 50 and 60. What an amazing vista we had. I felt bad as I was leading Ted up to the summit, kept telling him to “man... look at that” at which point he usually stumbled almost falling off the trail because. “Let me look at the switch backs, then if I fall — I’ll fall into the mountain — not off!”

Ted was going for a sub 24 hour finish to beat his Leadville PR of last year. Unfortunately, he didn’t make it.

In a very emotional crew meeting at 4:30 AM Sunday at the last aid station (May Queen 87 miles), he pulled himself out of the race. His back, hip, and leg were experiencing severe muscles spasms possibly caused from an IT band inflammation which started early in the race. Ted couldn’t hold himself erect, and couldn’t walk more than a few feet before having to stop. Dr. Lisa kept trying “snap, crackle & pop” manipulations but these only offered short relief from his agony. It was the hardest thing for Ted to do, but he always tells me to “run safe — run smart” and before he dropped he said he wasn’t doing either.

I admire this guy more than you know for his guts and determination, but more importantly his decision to drop to run another day. Anyone else would have dropped long before.

Things Done Right:
Experiencing Leadville 100 for the first time.

Witnessing the most amazing feats by Matt, and all the CRUD folks.

Things Done Wrong:
Not a damn thing!

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Cathy reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: crew
Results: our runner, Lee Burton, completed the race

General Summary:
Lee's wife Sharon organized a five person crew, three who also paced sections, and she brought in an Ironman competitor to pace Mayfield to Halfmoon.

Things Done Right:
We supported our runner, getting the correct gear to each aid station on time. Lee made good time, and completed the race in better condition than previous years.

Things Done Wrong:
Crewing for Leadville is not easy. It involves a lot of driving, and jumping up every couple hours to get ready for the next aid station. Our crew decided to do a better job of alternating going to aid stations next time, in order to get more sleep.

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Mt. Disapointment 50km - Angeles National Forest, Mt. Wilson CA - August 13, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: finish
Results: 7 hours 29 minutes

General Summary:
Mt Disappointment 50km was held in the Angeles National Forest. I did this as a training run for the upcoming Wasatch 100 in September.

Things Done Right:
Drank only water with electrolyte caps. I have had NO stomach or bowel issues since doing this compared to gator aid,(gator-barf) or cytomax. Ate "Jurek" bars (Organic Food Bars) and Carb Boom, and ginger bars for calories. Took enzyme tablets to aid in carbohydrate utilization.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have pushed harder, but was afraid of getting hurt before Wasatch.

Any Other Stuff:
The last five miles were tough! All uphill. Hope Pass without the altitude. Great training run though, and well organized.

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Deseret News Marathon - Salt Lake City, UT - July 25, 2005

Brenda and Joe Cowell report:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Survive record heat and finish
Results: Survived record heat and finished

General Summary:
5:30 am start(actually got going about 5:50) was a cool idea, pun intended, but it was well into the 90’s by finish time.

Things Done Right:
Dressed light, drank lots, sought out shade when possible.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t bring power-gels and wished we had.

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Grin and Bear It - Crested Butte - July 23, 2005

John Mills reports:
Distance: 9.3 miles
Goal: 2 hrs
Results: 2:01

General Summary:
Great “swag” bag with race entry! The race follows the CB Wildflower Festival by one week so the scenery is always spectacular. Small race — around 100 entrants. Great prizes and raffle stuff. Only drawback is 9:00AM start — heat becomes a factor.

Things Done Right:
Hill training. Both up and down.

Any Other Stuff:
Course is 9.3 mi, 8 blocks of asphalt (4 beginning and end), some dirt roads, and majority singletrack. Out and back from CB to Green Lake at the base of Mt Axtell, elev 10600 ft.

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Barr Trail Mountain Race - Barr Trail - July 17, 2005

Andrea Cichosz reports:
Distance: 13 miles
Goal: Under 3 hours
Results: 3:08
Website: www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Hot, hot, hot.

Things Done Right:
Went with the flow and realized that it was not the day for me to be setting records. I had my own water bottle which I had refilled at every station. I was actually on the way to my goal to be under 3:00 hours until the incident described below.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t wrap my ankle like I had done on all downhill runs since April and sprained it about 1.5 miles from the finish. A hardy four letter expression was sounding along the switchbacks. Knowing that I had about 30 minutes before the real pain sets in, I got up and kept running, haha. At that point I just wanted to be done with it and as soon as I stopped running, the ankle hurt so bad, I couldn’t walk on it.

Any Other Stuff:
As much as I was upset about hurting my ankle, I have to say that in regards of some of the things happening on the mountain that day, it was puny. A lady having a big head wound after falling, another one suffering from heat exhaustion, being carried down piggy back style by a good soul, and all that is nothing compared to the hiker who lost his life that day. My heart goes out to his family and friends.

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Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2:35:00
Results: 2:39:13
Website: www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Mountain trail race up Barr trail, turn around point Barr Camp.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
It was hot!!!

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Louise Erasmus reports:
Distance: 12Miles
Goal: 2:20
Results: 2:27
Website: www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
It was a very hot day!! I like running in the heat.:)

Things Done Right:
I kept up the pace going up. Felt strong.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not take my own drink. I did not run very fast downhill. I need to run faster downhill.

Any Other Stuff:
Very sad about the guy that died.

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Chad Halsten reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 1:55
Results: 1:53

General Summary:
very happy with the results...took about 13 minutes off of my time from last year. training with the incline club has definitely paid off...going to keep pushing till the ascent. :)

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John O'Donnell reports:
Distance: 12 mile
Goal: 2:30
Results: 2;47
Website: www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
good run considering moved my son into his first house on Saturday and went to the rodeo that night. got real hot fast also.

Things Done Right:
Good carbs and training up to this point.

Things Done Wrong:
poor hydration got back cramps on the way down at finish.
Other Stuff =

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Gahlen Crawford reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 3:00 — 3:15
Results: 3:20:14
Website: www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
It was very hot by the time I finished the race. Even so, it was a well organized race with great volunteers.

Things Done Right:
I have been running with the Incline Club since the spring. This has been a great preparation.

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Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 12mile
Goal: sub 2hr 5 min
Results: 2hr 4min 38sec

General Summary:
uphill 6 miles back downhill 6 miles

Things Done Right:
good short taper, got some sleep the three nights before the race, have been training alot this year in preparation for the double on pikes peak.

Things Done Wrong:
still fighting a toe injury from march that just wont quite go away.

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Tahoe Rim Trail 50 mile - Lake Tahoe, NV - July 16, 2005

Anita bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles (actually about 53-54)
Goal: under 12 hours
Results: 11 hours and 54 minutes

General Summary:
It was a long, hot day, and most of the race was above 8000 feet, so those of us who live at sea level had a hard time. There were a few confusing places, where some people got lost, but if you paid attention, it wasn’t too bad.

Things Done Right:
Took in lots of fluids, and kept the calories consistent throughout the race. I was heat trained. The Mohave has been over 110 for weeks where I live. That helped. Drank only water, and took electrolyte capsules, so I had NO stomach problems. It only has taken me 6 years of running ultras to figure this out.

Things Done Wrong:
Wasn’t acclimated. The last half was tougher than the first half, where there were more climbs at high altitude.

Any Other Stuff:
Beautiful. A great training run for Leadville, Wasatch, or the Bear. Finisher’s award was kind of cheap.

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Summer Round Up 12K - Stratton open space - July 10, 2005

Larry Miller reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: finish
Results: won age group
Website: http://www.pprrun.org

General Summary:
This was a new course again, TCR has moved the second leg of the TCR so many time it’s hard to keep up with it. The best was the Colorado Springs 10k Classic, not the one run how days but the one that started in Memorial Park and finish there. This new course has some problems that I will e-mail the TCR, it’s not the Incline Club’s problem.

Things Done Right:
Cut back on a couple runs before the race, in the race keep close to the front of the race in the start, this was due to running the course the week before and knowing where it went, and also knowing of a couple problem areas.
One other thing I did right, four mountain bikes on the course didn’t yield to them, may of gotten them a little wet.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t try and outrun a person at the finish line.

Any Other Stuff:
The runs we do at 8am and Thursday and Tuesday nights in the heat made a big difference I didn’t even notice the heat as some runners did.
Knowing the course was a big help, for one thing I knew where two areas that could slow me down were. One when going off the parking lot people would slow down, due to the steep down and grassy and then at the top of the hill a wood fence crossing the trail would and could backup runners from what I heard it did happen in both locations. Who knows if TCR will move the second leg again, too bad they don’t go back to the real second leg where they had over 1600 runners.

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Louise Erasmus reports:
Distance: 7.22
Goal: 58minutes
Results: 1 hour and 23 seconds

General Summary:
It was a new race course. Flat at first then between mile 3 and 4 a nice big hill, then from there is all down hill. Hopefully the race will be at the same trail next year. It is a very curvy trail run.

Things Done Right:
I felt very good in this race. I try to keep at a certain pace. I usually go to fast in the beginning. I managed to keep my pace. I ran the downhill very fast.

Things Done Wrong:
I slowed down a bit on the hill.

Any Other Stuff:
They need to marked the course a bit clearer. Especially after mile 4

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Bianca Kriel reports:
Distance: 7.22 miles
Goal: To finish:)
Results: 2nd in 14 & Under Age Group

General Summary:
Overall the race was a lot of fun. Of course it was mostly held on trail except for the first mile but it was a pleasure to be running again on trail rather than road. The 4th mile was a tough one rising 500 feet in total. Hey, that’s why we do hill repeats:)

Things Done Right:
Everything

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing, except not paying attention and falling.

Any Other Stuff:
This apparently had been a newly chosen course for the race and I recommend it to anyone who would like to run it next year, if, they still have the same course.

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Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: ???? New Course
Results: 1:06:39
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Trail race in the Stratmore Open Space. Lots of hills, and single track. Beautiful scenery.

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Alana Podratz reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: 1 hour 10 minutes Results: 1 hour 16 minutes General Summary:
Fun Course Things Done Right:
Summer Round Up training runs Things Done Wrong:
I bottomed out right before the reservoir on the way down. I ended up with 4 stitches in my left knee! I was a bloody mess but I finished! :)

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: under 1.5 hours
Results: 1.10
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathom.org

General Summary:
warm day and trail in good condition. trail narrow at times, hard to pass.

Things Done Right:
good pre-race meal. plenty of fluids and gu packs.

Things Done Wrong:
should of passed more early in race.

Any Other Stuff:
did extra miles by running course again

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Gahlen Crawford reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1:10 — 1:15
Results: 1:13:45
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/race_results/2005_srt_12K.htm

General Summary:
Great race and nice location.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the Tuesday and Thursday morning group on the course.

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Andrea Cichosz reports:
Distance: 7.25 mi
Goal: 1:20
Results: 1:21

General Summary:
A new course, that everybody had told me that it was pretty bad. And it really wasn’t. It was more like a little “Barr Trail Mountain Race".

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go all the way out in the beginning. Paced myself in the “heat” (nothing compared of things to come the next week). Used it as a training run not to be to worn out for the real Barr Trail Mountain Race.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have pushed myself a little more. Never saw the 7 mile marker and thought that was the longest mile until I saw the finish line and was there.

Any Other Stuff:
My 11 year old son Joshua ran the race and came in 3 minutes after me. Hooray Joshua.

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Bruce Barrell reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1 hour
Results: 59:25
General Summary:
Nice trail run with enough variety to keep it interesting! The hills aren't as hard as I heard some people saying they would be. This was my first time running this one, being new to the area. The group went out fast, which is something you want to keep in mind - once you get to the single track, you don't want to get stuck behind slower runners. Once you get to the reservoir, there is a good flat section to catch your breath and pass a few people if you're so inclined. I'll be back next year for sure. Very well run event.

Things Done Right:
I had a pretty good warm-up, mostly in the soccer field next to the school. I had a very light breakfast the morning of the race, so my stomach felt perfect. I didn't go out too fast, which in one sense was good, but later I got stuck behind some slower runners and it was a bit frustrating not being able to pass at times.

Things Done Wrong: I should have warmed up a bit more so as to be able to go out with a bang and be sure to be nearer the front after about mile 2 (?). Once on the single track, it can be tough to pass, though the other runners were very nice.

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Vail Hill Climb - Vail - 7/3/05

Andy Kovats reports:
Distance: 7+ mi
Goal: beat last year’s time/place of 65min/84 OA
Results: met or beat time goal, improved ~30 places
Website: http://vailrec.com

General Summary:
The course starts at the ski area base, winds around on mostly flat pavement for about 1.5 miles (an extra 1/2 loop was added this year over last year’s course making the times about 2 minutes slower) and then climbs 2200 feet to the Gondola top at 10,300 feet. It follows mostly cat walk roads so there is plenty of space to run and there are a few short flats or slight downhills the second half of the course. As usual it was an impressively competitive field of runners. Fortunately Bob McAndrews showed up to take an age group award and keep the Incline Club tradition going. This year they had results posted quickly and had awards started as the last runners were arriving. The most moving moment was the loud applause for a runner heading back to Iraq for his 3rd tour the next day.

Things Done Right:
Held back a bit on the flats early in the race, though probably still took off a bit too fast. Focused on foot turnover and tried to capitalize on the flat/downhill sections. I also kept tight to the inside of each switchback turn and noticed many other runners staying to the middle or even outside which had to cost a couple strides on each turn!

Things Done Wrong:
Might try firmer running shoes next time and recent allergies probably didn’t help my breathing. If one plans to stand around for awards/drawings, toss in some sunscreen for your bag going to the top.
Other Stuff =

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Leadville Trail Marathon - Leadville - July 2nd, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4:28
Results: 4:55
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/

General Summary:
Felt like I was pacing myself very well over the first half. Didn’t feel nearly as spent as last year’s race by the time I reached the turnaround point at 13,000’ Mosquito Pass. Lack of conditioning really caught up to me though as I actually ran the last half slower than the first... Even though there is a net elevation gain of 3,000’ on the way out and 3,000’ elevation loss on the return!!

Things Done Right:
Ran well within myself to the halfway point.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough preparation. Not enough miles on the legs.

Any Other Stuff:
One the most beautiful marathon courses I’ve run. Also one of the hardest.

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Slacker Half Marathon - Loveland Ski Area - June 25, 2005

Shawn LaCroix reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: Finish it
Results: 2:13
Website: http://www.co.clear-creek.co.us/Depts/Youth_Sev/slacker_race.htm

General Summary:
Was happy with this race. Longest I’ve ever run. Cramped up in leg on last mile but finished it out.

Things Done Right:
Kept on plugging.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t drink enough water
Calculator =
Other Stuff =

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Mt. Evans Ascent - Echo Lake, CO - June 18, 2005

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: sub 3:00
Results: 3:12:20
Website: http://

General Summary:
North America’s Highest Paved Road Race, 14.5 miles from Echo Lake, 10,600 feet, to the summit of Mt. Evans, 14,264 feet.

Things Done Right:
Able to maintain a conservative pace throughout the race despite nursing a tight hamstring that prevented running until 3 days before race.

Things Done Wrong:
None ... unless not allowing enough time to recover from an injury, but then I probably wouldn’t be accepted as a member of the group if I did!

Any Other Stuff:
Definitely a fun race with great scenery! Well administered and supported!

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Valley of the Flowers Half-Marathon - Lompoc, CA. - June 18, 2005

Lee Moss reports:
Distance: Half Marathon
Goal: 1:35
Results: 1:39
Website: http://www.impulse.net/~lvdc

General Summary:
Nice race organization. Very small. Only 130 or so runners. Out and back course with the turn around along the ocean.

Things Done Right:
Had a good time. I was the family Photographer. Got everyone’s picture during the race.

Things Done Wrong:
didn’t eat what I should have before the race.
All I had was a bowl of cereal and two cups of coffee.
Went out too fast and bonked on the way back.
Other Stuff =

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The San Juan Solstice 50 Mile Run - Lake City Colorado - June 18, 2005

Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 50 Miles
Goal: To Finish Prior to the 16 Hour Cutoff
Results: 14:31
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/

General Summary:
This my second 50 mile ultra race was going to be tough. There was substantial snow pack along the course above 12,000’. This resulted in multiple post-holed snow fields, detours which sent us scrambling over loose rock, and even repelling down a 100’ snow chute (thought of you here Larry!) In the first 6 miles there were so many creek crossings, that I lost count. Either that or the waste deep bone-numbing cold water caused memory loss. It wasn’t until we started the first climb up to 13,100 at mile 10 that I regained the feeling below my lower extremities. We made our second climb to over 13,000 by mile 25 along the Continental Divide. I don’t know if it was the altitude, but the vistas from up there were literally breath-taking! Weather conditions were optimum, although temperature at the lower elevations were in the 80s. Incredible course with a great organization, volunteers, and sponsors.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated and fueled during the entire race. Carried two bottles; one with water, one mixed with Hammer gel or Cytomax and water. Was prepared for the 9 mile distance between several aid stations. Power hiked the ascents, ran where ever possible. Refueled but didn’t linger at the aid stations. Had a change of shoes and socks at Carson waiting for me. Carole (best support crew ever) was there to meet me at Williams Creek (16) & Slum (40), making sure I had everything I needed and kicked my butt to get back out there.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran an extra ~5 miles after missing the Waterdog Trail turn off just past the final aid station at mile 46. I retraced all the way back to the aid station and got back on course. I calculated that I lost almost one hour. Rather deflating, but I sucked it up and finished.

Any Other Stuff:
http://www.lakecity50.com/profile.gif

At the Sunday morning awards, it was announced that 90% of the Lake City populace volunteered — or helped out — with the race in some capacity. A truly unique and challenging running experience.

Colorado Springs was well represented by Incline and CRUD team runners. Dan Vega was the winner, with amazing performances by Eric Gabe, Paul Smith, Keith Grimes, & Rich Muzzy.

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Bill Ransom reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: 13 hours
Results: 15:45
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/

General Summary:
Well, I survived the Saturday Lake City San Juan 50!

This was without a doubt the hardest 50 I’ve ever done. The San Juan had about 12 major river crossings, dozens of stream crossings, huge snowfield crossings, mud swamps, huge hill climbs, you name it. The only good thing was that the weather was perfect.

There were 150 entrant places. I head that there were 20 no shows and about 30 DNFs. You had 16 hours to do the race (the usual time limit is 12 hours for a 50). The middle of the pack finish time runs about 13 1/2 hours. We started at 5am with a 9pm cut-off.

How did I do? I think I finished 3rd from the last with 15 min to spare. Pretty crappy, huh? Well strange things happen... First off I started in no big hurry. I intended to have a good time and take in the views. I’ve never been in this part of Colorado or seen the Continental Divide before. The views are spectacular and the geology was very interesting.

With 15 miles to go I was talking with someone and slid off an embankment, skinned up my right shin pretty bad and then it started swelling up. I made it to the last aid station at the 4 to go point. Then I screwed up big time and missed a turn. I started trucking up this steep, long hill. Then I came to this nice cabin and a large lake. I went around one side of the lake and finally the trail petered out. I spent a few minutes looking around for the race trail markers, but couldn’t find any. Then I realized that I haden’t seen any markers for a while. As Homer Simpson would say: “Dough!” with a smack upside the head. So I turned around and went back to the last aid station. Sure enough, I missed the turn. That mistake cost me about 6 additional miles and a good 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Well, I made it to the finish with 15 min to spare. Most of the CRUDs (about 10 CRUDS did the race) were hanging out waiting for ol’ Bill. We all had a good laugh. I saw a paramedic and she decided to send me to the local clinic to check out my leg — really badly swollen and bruised. I ended up getting a tetanus shot and some ice packs. Funny thing, my injury was the worse one — no heart attacks or altitude sickness.

The awards were given out Sunday morning. Fellow CRUD team member Dan Vega won the race, about 1 1/2 hours slower than Matt Carpenter’s last year record time. Funny thing: I got a special award for being a dumb ass. They gave me an envelope with a $50 bill in it. That’s about $10/per extra mile. Not too bad. Fellow CRUD and Incliner Gordon Barnett also took that same wrong turn, so I wasn’t the only one who did that.

Things Done Right:
I’ve done a few 25-30 mile long runs this year. These long training runs are very important if you want to complete an ultra.

Things Done Wrong:
I can’t seem to be able to talk and run at the same time. Missed a race marker and took a wrong turn.

Any Other Stuff:
All of the Lake City townfolk were very friendly and I think 3/4 of them volunteered for race support. Lake City is a wonderful town (much larger than Leadville) and they should consider doing a summer race series like Leadville does.

The mountain views during the race were amazing. Parts of the race course are so remote that the average hiker would never go to the places we went to. If you ever want to do a 50, this is the 50 to do. Don’t let the course description on the web site scare you. This race is doable, it just takes a little training and determination.

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Garden of the Gods 10 mile - Colorado Springs - June 12, 2005

Garden of the Gods 10 mile - Colorado Springs - June 12, 2005
Beverly Weaver reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 2 hours
Results: 2:00:15
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Very pleasant day for a race — cool and cloudy for most of the time.

Things Done Right:
Tried to run each mile at the same effort. Hydro repeats definitely made me stronger on the hills.

Things Done Wrong:
If I am going to run road races, I need to do more of them. Running on the trails makes me stronger, but I am not fast.
Other Stuff =

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Andy Dillon reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:15
Results: 131 23/90 Andy T Dillon 42 Colo Springs CO 1:17:15
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/race_results/2005_gog_10m.htm

General Summary:
Perfect Conditions — cool and cloudy with plenty of moisture in the air. Felt like a PR day!

And it turned out to be a PR day — I was hoping I could run 7 and a half minute miles to get a 1:15 but I beat my PR of 1:18 so I had a good day.

I love this race — and it’s so nice to see so many Incline Club members running.

Things Done Right:
It’s a tough race to pace because it’s so hilly — I wanted to do 7:30 miles but the downhills are going to be faster and the uphills are going to be slower so I was constantly doing arithmetic in my head (seems to get harder as the miles go on!). But you have to have a goal!

Pushed it on the downhills — got to make up as much time as possible when you can.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably could have gone a little faster at times — especially in the last 3 miles — but I never quite felt like giving it 100% for some reason. I often get this kind of lethargy near the end of races just when you are supposed to go for it! Always seems to happen to me on the Ascent too for some reason.

Any Other Stuff:
Great race — great volunteers and a beautiful course. It’s really a pleasure to take part in this race, and since it’s so close to my home I always feel like it’s “my race."

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Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Under 1:28
Results: 1:26:11 PR
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Road race thru Garden of the Gods park. Hilly course, beautiful scenery.

Things Done Right:
Well rested, well hydrated and fueled.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have tapered better, more.

Any Other Stuff:
Great racing weather, overcast and cool. Great volunteer support as always.

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Mike Shafai reports:
Distance: 10M
Goal: Beat last year’s time
Results: Beat lat year’s time
Website: http://pprrun.org

General Summary:
I think everyone knows about this one, so I’ll spare the details!

Things Done Right:
Didn’t wear a watch, so I wasn’t so concerned about time.

Things Done Wrong:
Kept thinking about Ted Bidwell’s challenge to finish in under 69 minutes. Since I didn’t wear a watch, I had no way of knowing anyway.
Other Stuff =

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Andrea Cichosz reports:
Distance: 10 M
Goal: 1:40
Results: 1:46:47
Website: http://

General Summary:
I guess even the fact that it was my birthday didn’t help on this course. I loved the cool morning and compared with the following Sunday’s hot!!!! temperatures I think we were handed a little bonus.

Things Done Right:
I didn’t get carried away by the crowd at the beginning.
I paced myself well, stayed on my planned pace for 9 of the 10 miles.

Things Done Wrong:
It’s that one mile, 8 to 9 that did me in. I lost all my time on that *%?&^ mile. At that point I paid for all the training sins of the last 5 weeks. Two trips to sea level one of them to Germany. Got back Friday night at 11:30 pm. Probably not enough sleep.

Any Other Stuff:
It was a good wake-up call just in time to refocus for the Ascent.

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Louise Erasmus reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1.16
Results: 1.19.43

General Summary:
Was a nice cool morning. Perfect running conditions. Mother Nature did not agree with me but otherwise I did good.

Things Done Right:
Kept up the pace I set for myself. Did not go out to fast.

Things Done Wrong:
Slowed down a bit the last 2 miles. Unfortunately “Mother Nature” played a big role in my results. I won’t go in detail what that is.:)
Other Stuff =

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Bianca Kriel reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: To finish in time 1:54
Results: 1.51.58

General Summary:
Perfect, ended up getting First in the 14 & Under Age Group.

Things Done Right:
Strategy of running downhill and flats and trying to run uphills, If I had the energy otherwise speedwalk it.

Things Done Wrong:
Drank TOO much water at the water stations.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was hard but fun. It was beautiful although I couldn’t focus on the beauty part of it.

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Alana Podratz reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 1 hour 40 minutes
Results: 1 hour 46 minutes

General Summary:
Difficult!

Things Done Right:
Trained at Garden Runs

Things Done Wrong:
Too many trail training runs-not enough road

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Bruce Barrell reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 1:15
Results: 1:16:43

General Summary:
What a great run! Thiw was my first time, being new to the area. Nice, easy warm-up start, then the rolling hills begin.

Things Done Right:
Right = I did this one on minimal training, so was pretty happy with how I felt overall, and was able to lock into a good steady pace for me. I carried a fanny pack water bottle which helped me have Accelerade available when I wanted it...

Things Done Wrong:
Wrong = I can't get the hydration right!! Why do I always have to stop to pee 10-15 minutes into the race??!

Any Other Stuff:
Other Stuff = This is a good, challenging hill course... great for someone like me new to the area and ready for a taste of the reality of racing above sea level.

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Shawn LaCroix reports:
Distance: 10
Goal: Finish!
Results: 1:48

General Summary:
Wasn’t feeling it.

Things Done Right:
I finished

Things Done Wrong:
Woods and stopping bathroom breaks.
Calculator =
Other Stuff =

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Holcomb Valley 33 Mile Trail Run - Big Bear CA - June 12, 2005

Anita Fromm reports:
Distance: 33 miles
Goal: under 7 hours
Results: 6:42
Website: http://holcombvalleytrailrun.com

General Summary:
Lots of rocks and roots, hot temperatures, and high altitude make this race a good challenge and training run. Not+ a lot of trail markings, so you need to pay attention.

Things Done Right:
Paid attention to trail markings and didn’t get lost. Legs were still tired from the previous weekends 50 mile run from hell, but pushed, since at Wasatch I will be running on tired legs anyway. Ran the rocky downhill sections, albeit slowly, but at least I didn’t tip toe like a sissy like last year.

Things Done Wrong:
Water bottle sprung a leak, so I got a bit dehydrated towards the end. I was secretly hoping for a 6 1/2 hour finish, but running out of water early on and getting dehydrated prevented this.

Any Other Stuff:
Great homemade cookies at the aid station!

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Badwater Ultramarathon - Death Valley, CA - June 11, 2005

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 135
Goal: Pace my friend to under 50 hours
Results: Paced my friend to under 43 hours

General Summary:
It was 95 degrees at 6:00 AM start time (first wave, waves were 2 hours apart). It got hotter, up to 124 degrees. Pacers not allowed for the first 17 miles, for good reason, the traffic was heavy due to crew vehicles and other waves heading to start line. Paced for most of the last 118 miles (~90 miles). After finishing the race we continued up to Mt. Whitney for another 15 miles and a total of 150 miles (which is what the race did in the past, but no more).

Things Done Right:
Drank about 20 ounces of fluid every mile. Sweat, although I never saw it dripping, it must have been too hot to stay on the skin too long.

Things Done Wrong:
I got behind on the fluids once, had to sit out a few miles until I got an extra gallon of cold water down. After that, everything went fine. Gouged my left leg wide open walking back down from the summit of Mt. Whitney (hit a little snow over ice and slammed into a snow bank with a sharp rock). Rock to the big leg bone behind the shin bone. Immediately took my long sleeve blue Incline Club shirt, put snow in the body of the shirt, rolled it up, wrapped it around the wound, tied the arms off above the wound to slow the bleeding. Must have lost a pint or more. Took another 6 hours to get to the emergency room, doc said I was lucky to have made it, until he found out I had tied it off with my Incline Club shirt, then he said it must be the best club.

Any Other Stuff:
Incline Club shirts are great! Saved my life!

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Deadwood Mickelson Trail Marathon - Deadwood, SD - June 5th, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 3 hrs
Results: 3:19
Website: http://deadwoodmickelsontrailmarathon.com/

General Summary:
http://cloud.prohosting.com/~mtnclmbr/marathons/sd/deadwood.htm

Things Done Right:
Kept running through pain. Didn’t stop.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t hydrate before race. Duhh.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice course through the beautiful Black Hills of South Dakota.

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Rebekka Hannula reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 4:28:46
Website: http://www.deadwoodmickelsontrailmarathon.com

General Summary:
This was my first marathon , so I didn’t really know what to expect. My time might not support this claim, but I ran the whole race :-). All in all I had a good first marathon.

Things Done Right:
Brought my Camelbak and gel. It got very hot.

Things Done Wrong:
I’ve been having knee problems for a couple of month, so the two weeks before the marathon were spent inhaling mega doses of aspirin and ibuprofen. It didn’t help! My knee started hurting just 3 miles into the race and my stomach acted up between miles 15 and 20!

Any Other Stuff:
Beautiful course! The course consists of two parts: The first half is UP, it peaks at the 13.1 mile point, from there it’s all downhill or flat except for a brief “up".

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Casper Marathon - Casper WY - June 5, 2005

Joe and Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Brenda’s 8th state and Joe’s 15th
Results: Finished

General Summary:
Race followed the N. Platte river thru and around Casper primarily on a paved bike path. Weather was cool at the start but warmed up quickly to 75. Fortunately there was a fair breeze. The course was rolling and the elevation a little over 5000 ft.

Things Done Right:
We are getting real good at carbo-loading and enjoying the runners and new courses each race.

Things Done Wrong:
Everything went pretty much as planned.

Any Other Stuff:
Enjoyed the small town atmosphere and the beautiful parks in Casper. Also getting to know and recognize a few of the “50 staters."

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Squaw Peak 50 mile Trail Run - Orem UT - June 4th, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: survive
Results: did
Website: http://squawpeak50.com

General Summary:
The worst running conditions EVER! Ten miles of snow. And not fluffy well behaved Currier and Ives snow, but nasty, avalanche snow, chock full of broken, jagged trees ready to impale you.

Things Done Right:
Helped a friend finish. Then she helped my tired ass. Took in plenty of calories, had no stomach problems. Did not run into any bears, like I did at the top of the incline June 1st.

Things Done Wrong:
Tied a trash bag around my semi frozen ass to get down Windy Pass, as 11,000 foot snow covered mountain. Yes, I got down faster, but my level of control where I landed was greatly diminished. My heart just wasn’t in this race, and I don’t intend to run it again.
Other Stuff =

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Rocky Mountain Double Marathon - Medicine Bow National Forest, Laramie, WY - May 29, 2005

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 52.4 miles
Goal: under 10 hours
Results: 9:02:12
Website: http://www.angelfire.com/wy2/marathon/

General Summary:
Choice of half-marathon, marathon or double on an out and back course. Dirt roads in the national forest and a stretch of pavement along the I-80 frontage road before entering the national forest again. Nice course inside the forest. The hard surface on the roads for 12 miles (3 miles x 4) really hit my quads.

Cool, some rain and sleet, windy.

Things Done Right:
Just ran my won race and did not worry about being competitive. Doing a long run was my goal.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t take in enough electrolytes during the entire run.
Other Stuff =

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Bishop High Sierra 50 miler - Bishop CA - May 21st, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: sub 11 hours
Results: 11:42
Website: http://bhs.org

General Summary:
The Bishop High Sierra is a tough 50 miler at high altitude, and offers a 50 km version and 20 mile option. Mostly on trails in the beautiful High Sierras of California.

Things Done Right:
Stayed positive, even though the altitude kicked my butt. It was also very hot, which normally isn’t a problem for me if I am used to it. However, it has been an unusually cool spring out here, and nobody was ready for the 90+ degree heat.

Things Done Wrong:
Carried too much. In this race, the aid stations are so close and well stocked that it is only necessary to carry one water bottle.

Any Other Stuff:
A perfect combinations of rocks, unending climbs, and long downhill sections. Very well organized.

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Fargo Marathon - Fargo, North Dakota - May 14, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 3 hours
Results: 3:07
Website: http://www.fargomarathon.com/

General Summary:
http://cloud.prohosting.com/~mtnclmbr/marathons/nd/fargo.htm

Things Done Right:
wore only a singlet

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
This race is one of top five best organized marathons I’ve ever run and this was their first year! Excellent. The attention to detail was evident throughout, from the volunteers posted at every turn to point the proper way to the life-sized story boards course maps and FAQ’s to the on-time well-advertised awards ceremony the race directors had this nailed!

My highest recommendation for your “ND Marathon"!

This was my 36th marathon state, 68th marathon. Next on the agenda is a trail marathon in Deadwood, SD on June 5th.

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Ft. Collins Old Town Marathon - Ft. Collins,Co. - May 8,2005

Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Realistic-under 4 hours Ultimate 3:50 to qualify for Boston
Results: 3:57:47 PR
Website: http://www.ftcollinsmarathon.com

General Summary:
Runs down the scenic Poudre River Canyon through La Porte and on to the Poudre River Trail to finish in Historic Old Town Fort Collins. Course has a subtle net downhill with very few turns.

Things Done Right:
Well hydrated,ate right the week as well as the night before. Race items set out and ready the night before. Trained right. Dressed right for the weather and the temp.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not sleep well the night before. Carried too much water. Went out too fast and died off in the second half. Too nervous and anxious before the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Very well organized event. Bused to the start and the buses remained at the start. It was cool and windy,so you were able to stay out of the weather until close to race time.

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: sub 4:30
Results: 4:14:42
Website: http://www.ftcollinsmarathon.com/

General Summary:
Point to point run through the scenic Poudre River Canyon through La Porte and on to the Poudre River Trail.

Things Done Right:
Maintained focus & pace through mile 22; was able to stretch out cramping hamstring during 13th mile and return to form

Things Done Wrong:
Cramping hamstring during mile 13; lost focus last 4 miles; didn’t take endurolytes until cramping occurred

Any Other Stuff:
Highly recommended race — small, friendly, well-administered, and scenic.

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Wild Wild West Marathon and 50km - Lone Pine, CA - May 7th, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 kilometers
Goal: under 6 hours
Results: 5 hours 55 minutes/ 5th overall, 1st in age group

General Summary:
It was a perfect day for a race. Temperatures were in the 60-70 range, and there was little wind. I helped mark the very hilly course all day on Friday, and was a bit tired Saturday morning, so I wasn’t sure if I would be able to finish in under 6 hours, but did, barely. The snow capped Sierras and tons of wild flowers from the unusual amount of rain also helped this to be a beautiful race.

Things Done Right:
Took in enough calories and liquid early on for a strong finish. Helping to mark the course helped me to know the course really well too. Didn’t over dress, as many did, so I didn’t waste time shedding layers, and tying them to me throughout the race. carried two water bottles, so I didn’t have to stop at all the aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Had to stop and “make brownies” which took off two or three minutes of time. Thank goodness the sagebrush was big and plentiful this year.
Other Stuff =

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Collegiate Peaks Trail Run - Buena Vista - May 7, 2005

Karen Brennan reports:
Distance: 50 miler
Goal: finsh around 9 hours, 30 min.
Results: finished in 9:10
Website: www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
It turned out to be a beautiful race day, the trails were soft dirt and the hills were never super long, the people at the aid stations were very friendly as were people on the course-my first 50 miler and it was a lot of fun (for the most part)!

Things Done Right:
I ate and drank the whole way and played around with different types of food to see what helped and when. I walked the up hills on the second loop (double loop course).

Things Done Wrong:
Should have brought my sunglasses as it was windy at times and dust/dirt kept getting into my contacts. Wasted some time on the second loop, during the last 2 hrs. as their was no one around me and got nervous more than once that I was going the wrong way, so I back tracked at times looking for a person or those yellow ties on the trees!
Other Stuff =

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: 9:00
Results: 8:25:27
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
This run is a two loop course on the east side of Buena Vista with great views of the Collegiate Peaks.
The views were limited this year by snow showers over the mountains.

Weather was generally good, some early light snow and the wind picked up as the race progressed. The race is managed by and aid stations manned by the Optimist Club of Buena Vista. Well organized and a good course.

The cost is $55 for 50-miles and $45 for the 25-mile race. A good value per mile. For $10 bucks you can get an all-you-can-eat carbo-load dinner the night before.

This year’s number of entrants was up dramatically from last year. Last year was a revival of the race after a 1 year hiatus. A lot of ultra trail runners rediscovered this race apparently.

There were only 40 finishers in the 50-miler last year and 160 in the 25-miler. This year there were 120+ 50 mile entrants and 170+ 25-miler entrants.

I was using this race as my preparation for Leadville in August.

Things Done Right:
Properly prepared for the run. Hydrated and eat enough, but not stuffing myself. Easy 10 minute run on Friday to losen up the legs.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably went out a little fast. My 25 mile split was the same as last year when I only ran the 25-miler. The last 12 miles seemed to take forever.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a good first time 50-miler for someone looking for their first 50-mile race.

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 25 Mile and 50 Mile Option
Goal: Run the 25 (under 5 hours) finish strong as a prelude to Lake City
Results: 4:33
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
This was my first time at the Collegiate Peaks 25 Miler. Carole and I drove to Buena Vista Friday afternoon — avoiding any speeding tickets on 24. Well organized event starting in 1990. Right number of well stocked aid stations with great volunteers. Breezy most the day with swirling winds at times. Cool conditions made for good running, even with the scattered snow pellets hitting us in the face. Excellent (dry) trail conditions with no snow or ice. 25 mile option ran in a clockwise direction, the 50 turned and ran back in a counter-clockwise direction. Rolling trail with some pretty decent climbs and down hills. Good SWAG. Will definitely be back to do this race again!

Things Done Right:
As I had not run this race previously, not really knowing the course and what to expect I took it fairly conservatively. Wore or tied a Tyvac jacket (came in really handy) around my waste. Talked to Pete about the course as he had run it several times previously.

Things Done Wrong:
Mixed more of my Hammer crystals than usual which made for a stronger dilution. As a result (I think), I suffered some stomach problems starting at mile 16 that lingered for the remainder of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Excellent showing by some familiar names: ERIK SOLOF (OVERALL WINNER), PAUL KOCH, BERNIE BETCHER, PAUL SULLIVAN, TED BIDWELL, PETER TONSITS, GINA & HARRY HARCROW, RICH MUZZY, LARRY DEWITT, ANTHEA SCHMID (1ST W), & “WILD” BILL RANSOM.

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Japan 5/3/05

Race Experience Eclipsed by the Joy of Japan
By Nancy Hobbs upon return from Japan 5/3/05

Tired, confused, more than frustrated. I’ve been running for 6 hours on an unfamiliar trail, a trail I’ve never seen except on a topo map. Believe me, the trail I’m on doesn’t look anything like the topo map I remember from yesterday and is not exactly what I expected from my memory of the course profile, save the beautiful vistas I encountered including wild cherry blossoms, bamboo shoots flanking the trail, worship flags floating the breeze by trailside shrines, villages in the distance. I am mentally drained, yet still searching for the right direction to stay on course - or at least somewhere near the course. I keep looking for some reassurance, even a course marking, but there are none. Sure, sign posts at the last junction which fanned out to four different routes, but I can’t read any of the characters on the signs. I wonder where my fellow competitors are after passing most of them for the second time that day. I see hikers young and old. I ask for water and they freely offer to fill my empty bottle. We exchange nods, but no spoken words. I score with a spot of caffeine from one hiker and her two children. The tea goes well with my last Gu packet. I don’t remember being on course at this point, I’m sure I took a wrong turn, probably more than one. I wasn’t willing to retrace my steps at this point because that meant uphill, more of the same. I didn’t know how far I’d traveled. No idea if I’d gone 10km, 20km, or 30km. No markings that I could read. And suddenly just ahead something slithered off the trail into the wooded bamboo and thick foliage. I bent down, picked up a stick ready to stave off the intruder. A bear? A snake? Probably a squirrel, but maybe not. I’m ready to defend myself…maybe.

At the start line there were 110 of us. A start line we reached after a one hour bus ride on winding roads from sea level climbing to about 1000 meters passing through tunnels, small villages, next to a few lakes, backing up over a final bridge before disembarking to walk 100 yards to the start area. In the staging area I noticed mostly men wearing tights and sporting backpacks, windbreakers, jingling bells dangling from their packs, several bottles of water visible on each side of their packs, energy bars protruding from mesh pockets, ski poles attached to their packs, eyes strained on maps until the last second before the start signal. The scene reminded me of the Eco Challenge, at least the scenes I’d viewed on the Outdoor Network coverage. The only thing that surprised me walking toward the start line was one of the competitors lighting up a cigarette and deeply inhaling the nicotine. We asked one of the English-speaking competitors if this was normal practice and he said firmly, “No. I’m as surprised as you are.”

I looked for water. Nothing but Ox tea. Not sure what this was, I passed and took a sip of Gatorade from my water bottle. I placed a Gu packet in my glove and two more under my water bottle, and one velcroed to my water bottle. I looked out of place in shorts, yet I wore a long sleeved polypro top. Having finished the Pikes Peak Marathon three times and surmising that the course would be less challenging than the Peak, I figured I’d be prepared as a minimalist and that I was in store and trained to run (my first 50km) for about 6 or 7 hours at most. As I stood at the start line, I glanced up and the first wave of 50 were off. Starting on pavement and running downhill for 100 yards and then a quick left onto a very narrow single-track trail. A no passing zone for sure.

Our group was at the ready and waited for commands from the race director. My US teammates Paul Low (a multi-year Teva US Mountain Running Team member who changed two days before from the 10km to run the 50km - his first) and Adam Chase (a seasoned adventure racer and ultrarunner from Boulder) jumped the gun when they heard a word that sounded like “go” although it was the start of the countdown in Japanese. We see sawed forward and back waiting for the right directive. An explosive bark of “HIGH” or something like it and we were off and unfortunately not more than one minute behind the first (much slower) group. Our group of 50+ quickly caught the first pack and joined the conga line up the single track trail. Paul less than a switchback ahead, Adam and I close behind chuckling at the line of competitors and the absurdity of trying to pass anyone on the precarious ridgeline which ended up being an uphill jaunt for nearly 10 minutes. Periodically a friendly competitor (we found that everyone was more than friendly and supportive) stepped to the side and let us pass.

Reaching the first “summit” Paul was working his way to the front of his first 50km effort, slowly skirting ahead of other runners and Adam and I were running together also making our way around competitors at every switchback. We finally reached a summit followed by a technical downhill and Adam pulled ahead. I skirted down the hill, but lost sight of Adam and found myself alone as no one had caught up to me.

At the bottom of the hill about 30 minutes into our race, there was a choice of a left or right turn. I looked up from the gnarly terrain and noted someone jogging to the left and looking at his course map heading down the trail. I chose to follow this person with a map. How could he be mistaken with a map in hand? After 30 minutes of rolling terrain, scaling a fence which looked to me like a Do Not Cross Zone, and some significantly exposed areas, I ended up near the start line with my Japanese map reader in tow realizing this was the wrong choice in turns. At this point I thought I should just quit and return to the start line, but couldn’t quite make it due to a treacherous precipice and no way to reach the start point just a few hundred feet in the distance.

Frustrated, I turned back to retrace my steps. I have always told people that when you think you are off course on a trail, go back to where you last saw trail markings and re evaluate your decision. I ran past the person studying the map as he stayed firmly planted on the trail looking down valley trying to decide which way to go. He ended up staying in place trying to sort out the map. By the time I was back “on course” which was evident when I spied a Boy Scout and Girl Scout with bright red wands directing traffic, urging me over a steel bridge on a highway, and pointing to another trail in the distance, there was not a person in sight. I was in last place. Mentally, not a good place to be.

Another climb. A long and steep uphill ascent complemented by narrow black and yellow twisted ropes hugging tree trunks and making the incline seem less challenging, but certainly not runable. I started passing the same runners again using the ropes occasionally to assist my uphill momentum as I made my way back on course. What made my frustration ease was the encouragement shown by my fellow competitors. I reached a set of steps and continued onward reaching another summit and was met with another choice. I waited for the closest competitor to help me decide which way to go. This would be a left-hand turn and another climb. Continuing to pass runners I looked for trail markings and found none to assure me that I had chosen the correct path. Two hours and 45 minutes later I somehow made Check Point one (there were to be four check points on the course). Long out of water, I asked for a refill at the station. Nothing. No water save a stream some 80 meters down a hill. I asked if the water was drinkable. Blank and empty stares. Choosing not to experiment with a potential case of Ghiardia, I scored a fresh
water bottle from a volunteer after much pleading, left a pull tag at the station so that organizers would know I made it to Check Point One and continued onward. There was no indication as to how far I’d traveled. Not a person spoke English to let me know the kilometer mark. Off I went up another hill. I figured I’d make the next station within one hour and had enough water for the journey. It ended up nearly two hours before I reached Check Point Two which was unmanned with no signs, or directions. A lone runner was stretched out on a bench hydrating and I pointed uphill to see if this was the correct direction of the three possible choices and received a nod in response. Off I went toward Check Point Three although I still had no idea how far I’d run.

This time I pushed my lap counter and figured another hour for Check Point Three. Not a chance. Within one hour I was out of water and had just finished another Gu. I figured I was still on course as I met a few hikers on the trail and I had seen a few markers on trees at a recent junction, but I was again out of water. Having been told by the race director the day before that there were several aid stations on course, including some self serve stations (these ended up being metal trash cans filled with water and a funnel floating at the surface) I felt confident that bringing one bottle of water would suffice. Wrong. Thank goodness the hikers I met were willing to part with some of their water and help me continue onward in a more hydrated state.

I was discouraged. I was tired. At several points I looked to the distance and noticed a village beyond. I knew downhill was coming soon yet I had only experienced a few short downhill sections so far, but each was followed quickly by a long uphill and many of the uphills had steep steps and more ropes attached to the tree trunks for assistance.

I finally reached a clearing which seemed to be the final climb before a long descent to town (my recollection of the topo map from the previous day’s exchange with the race organizers). A woman on the trail suggested I turn left on a trail leading to a road. Down I went. Six hours at this point.

I reached a clearing which led to a steep paved roadway and beautifully terraced fields with crops adjacent to farmhouses. No idea where I was, I continued down hoping for some confirmation that I was still on the course. It was not meant to be. My legs were trashed and the steep downhill on pavement made my quads scream. A bit anxious, no water, no grasp of the Japanese language beyond hello, no idea where I was, no idea where I should go, frustrated and confused. A western looking woman was hiking uphill and I stopped to visit with her telling her I was lost. She suggested I continue to town and go to the train station. I was penniless and she offered me some money. I figured I’d try to catch a ride with a passerby, or continue running and declined the yen she had in her outstretched palm. After another 15 minutes I decided my efforts to continue running with no idea of a destination were fruitless. Miraculously (at least I thought it a miracle) I spied a police car parked at a small house and walked up to the side door of the house.

Ringing the bell, I whispered “hello” first in English then in Japanese. Success with the Japanese term a woman came out from the back room. I said, “I’m lost. Can you help me.” She turned away and her husband appeared around the corner and asked me to come into the porch. We spoke…he in broken English, me with arm movements acting out my demise on the race course and getting lost. Somehow we communicated and he offered me sports drink (yes, I was again out of water), made a phone call and held the phone to me. He called an English-speaking friend and I was relieved. This policeman (clad in a grey USA flag T-shirt, shorts, and flip flops apparently on his day off) made numerous calls, writing Japanese characters on a piece of paper with several phone numbers after each call, and then leaving briefly to check the Internet in a back room for the race website (the race name in Japanese on my runner number and a subsequent Google search for the race name), and finally getting in touch with our Japanese hosts at the finish line. Unbelievable to me I was nearly 30Km by road from the finish line. After one hour with the policeman (who showed me his football helmet from high school - he played wide receiver, a photo of his son running the 100meter dash as a 12-year-old, and finally a photo of himself on his motorcycle leading a runner in a Japanese Ekiden event) he ushered me into the family SUV and he drove me to the race finish line. The car ride started with a Japanese CD and he quickly changed the CD and I said, “Oh, another Japanese singer?” He said, “No, American.” We sang and hummed together Bill Joel’s Piano Man, music I hadn’t heard for years yet I remember so many of the words.

After 45 minutes of driving, I was reunited at the finish line with Anita and our Japanese host. I found that only Adam had finished and he’d gone a bit off course and Paul was lost some 20Km away (I later found out that he reached the first check point on course 4 hours into the race) and eventually arrived at the third Check Point after nearly 7 or so hours of running. Our 10km runners were at the finish line and they’d all gotten lost on their course, but each had finished though after repeated attempts at finding the right route. Kelli Lusk had finished third overall with Anita Ortiz in 6th and Ethan Hemphill in 7th position. We were convinced that our American 10Km squad would have been one-two-three (or at least in the top five) for the finish had they not gone off course.

At the awards ceremony the following day we found out that 11 of 160 finished the 100km course with the first finisher in more than 18 hours and the 50km had 33 finishers of 110 competitors.

We offered many suggestions to the race organizers and will prepare a report for review. In spite of the adventure I encountered, it was a true learning experience as to how much I could push my body and still feel reasonable good in spite of such a long run. I do have an opinion that a trail race should be mostly runable and the course should be stocked with a few aid stations, be well marked for safety more than anything along with kilometer marks to establish bearings for race progress during the run. Because the Japanese also got lost in spite of having course maps and trail markings in Japanese, it was obvious that organizers must revisit the course in terms of marking and also for difficulty.

I can’t offer enough thanks to the policeman and his wife who rescued me, to the anonymous hikers on the course offering me water and Japanese tea, and to our host Mr. Shinji Mabe for taking care of our team. A truly memorable experience.


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Make A Wish - Denver, CO - May 1, 2005

Martina S. Ritchie reports:
Distance: 1/2 marathon
Goal: to enjoy the entire race & finish under 2 1/2 hrs
Results: had a terrific time and “did"

General Summary:
The weather was rainy, stormy and snowing on and off most of the time — perfect race conditions for me. The volunteers were wonderful, with stops every two miles. Lots to eat at the end with great age division trophies.

Things Done Right:
Since I have “slow twitch” muscles, I stated out slowly; by the time I hit the 10k point I was up to speed. I also drank the energy drinks at the aid stations and felt great at the end.

Things Done Wrong:
--I didn’t give myself enough time to get mentally into the race. Before I realized it, we were “off and running."

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Flying Pig Marathon - Cincinnati, OH - May 1, 2005

Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Beat the 4 hour ghost.
Results: 3.53.26 (beat the 4 hour ghost!!!)
Website: http://www.flyingpigmarathon.org

General Summary:
This was my fifth marathon and I have been struggling in my previous marathons with not being able to run through the whole race (always ending up walking the last miles) and not been able to finish within 4 hours. Not drinking enough, drinking too much, going out too hard has been some of my problems. This time everything worked as planned.

Things Done Right:
Conservative start and kept a 9min pace until mile 16 when I increased the pace somewhat. Had a GU every 30 minutes and did not eat anything that was offered along the course to avoid fiber intake :). Brought Gatorade Endurance in my waist camelback and drank some water at random aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much. Next time I’ll do some stretching before the start. I entered the start area two minutes before the gun.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice course through downtown Cincinnati and neighborhoods. Early start during sunrise added some spectacular views. A few hilly miles around mile 7-9 but otherwise rolling hills. The weather was perfect. Sunshine but not hot. Well organized with plenty of aid stations and a relatively large crowd. People handing out goodies (oranges, chocolate) along the way.

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Delaware Trail Marathon - Newark, DE - April 30th, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 4hrs
Results: 3hrs44min
Website: http://www.udel.edu/johnmack/traildawgs/tc/

General Summary:
http://cloud.prohosting.com/~mtnclmbr/marathons/de/delaware_tm.htm

Things Done Right:
Well hydrated.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran too hard from the beginning.

Any Other Stuff:
Wonderful, fun course. Very challenging and interesting throughout. I strongly recommend running trail marathons vice their counterpart--the dreaded, unforgiving roads!

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Shiprock Marathon - Shiprock N.M. - April 30, 2005

Joe and Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish 7th marathon in as many months
Results: met goal

General Summary:
Brenda and I ran this together and found it to be one of the best organized races we’ve done. Course was beautiful and weather was perfect.

Things Done Right:
Sunscreen, drank Gatorade and water at each aid station

Things Done Wrong:
The apple Carboom didn’t sit well.

Any Other Stuff:
The race was to benefit and promote good health on the Navajo reservation. Met several very nice people and we enjoyed the whole experience. We dragged the last several miles. Our legs may need a rest. Not sure about next month’s marathon. We may take a month off.

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Rainier Classic - Mt. rainier, Eashington - April 28, 2005

Jonathan Veteto reports:
Distance: don’t know
Goal: come back alive
Results: still smiling
Website: http://www.nps.gov/mora/climb/climb_cd.htm

General Summary:
a ‘race’ up the kautz glacier on mt. rainier. this year, it was held in the spring (it is sometimes held in the summer). conditions can be onerous, at best. this year, they turned bad the morning of the third day of the race.

Things Done Right:
1. stayed very hydrated and
2. traveled light
3. kept moving quickly through mildly hazardous areas

Things Done Wrong:
nothing really. the abundant snow on the 2nd night forced a return to the start line.

Any Other Stuff:
see the website for more details. the ‘course’ is in generally excellent shape, but with some objective avalanche and weather hazards. i would recommend this course to anyone interested :)

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Salt Lake City Marathon - Salt Lake City, UT - April 23, 2005

Theresa Pitman reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:40
Results: 3:53
Website: http://saltlakecitymarathon.com

General Summary:
Fun race and not as hilly as one would think but it was definitely enough to feel it in my legs 5 days later. It looked mainly downhill with little hills in between and the downhill took it’s toll on my quads by mile 18 when I fell off my pace. Two free concerts, one the day before (The Romantics) and one the night after the race, Third Eye Blind took the edge off of the race. It is such a beautiful city it was hard to stay off my feet.

Things Done Right:
Training up to when I should have been tapering, I’m not very good at tapering. Probably should have done some more downhill running to get my quads ready.

Things Done Wrong:
Not a good taper, which is hard considering my job is a personal trainer, and the fact I was visiting my friend and her super cute kids who I couldn’t stop playing with. I probably should have gotten off the trails a little bit since the road really pounded on my legs. I also was nursing some patellar tendonitis which started to flare up about halfway through.

Any Other Stuff:
This could be a really fast race, at least for an altitude person (it’s at about 4500’), but you have to train for the downhill, unfortunately I haven’t made it to the Barr Trail since it’s been icy.

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Spring Desert Ultra - Fruita, CO - April 23, 2005

Jim Cannon reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 5:00
Results: 5:40
Website: http://www.geminiadventures.com

General Summary:
If you like trail running, you will love this course!!! Beautiful, scenic, desert singletrack in the Kokopelli Trail area in Fruita, CO. Good “roller coaster” type terrain with plenty of challenging incline and great terrain changes. Reminds you of Intemann Trail. Killer views!!!!

Things Done Right:
Trained with IC over the winter. This course was a killer!!! Would be a very bad experience for someone who didn’t train long on trails.

Things Done Wrong:
Depends on the way you look at it. The mountain biking the day before left my legs a bit flat, but it was a truly priceless experience!!!!

Any Other Stuff:
There was also a 50 mile option (or second loop) on this course. Also, there were 5 & 10 mile shorter courses on Sunday.

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Boston Marathon - Boston, MA - April 18, 2005

Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: Beat 2004 Time
Results: 3:48:02 Beating 2004... barely
Website: http://bostonmarathon.org

General Summary:
This was my third Boston Marathon, the exhilaration of running the oldest organized marathon hasn’t diminished. Boston’s spring time weather quite often plays an important role, and this year was no exception. Although not as hot as 2004, the temperature was in the mid 70s for the start. Windy conditions prevailed for most of the course.

Things Done Right:
Increased the number of long training running runs, doubling Saturdays and Sundays prior to the marathon. Looked at this marathon as a training run for my summer’s race schedule: Collegiate Peaks, Lake City, pacing at Leadville. Enjoyed the day, high-fived kids along the way. Remembered how humbling this Boston course can be.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing really, could have had more speedwork for quicker leg turn-over, but hey... it’s a log season.

Any Other Stuff:
Very touching tribute at the start to Johnnie Kelly, “Young at Heart.” Catherine the “Great” Ndereba (Kenya) in 2:25:13, first woman 4-time winner! Ethiopian runner Hailu Negussie broke the Kenyan men’s dominance with a 2:11:45 winning time. Amazing 6-time winning wheelchair athlete Ernst Van Dyk (South Africa) 1:24:11. THREE American men in the top 11, including Colorado’s Alan Culpepper and his awesome 4th place finish (2:13:39). Master men’s Joshua Kipkembi (Kenya) 2:19:28.

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Chad Halsten reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 2:55
Results: 3:06
Website: http://bostonmarathon.org

General Summary:
well...I didn’t get the time I was hoping for, but it was a great experience! The town of Boston and it’s people are AMAZING! definitely had the most vocal and enthusiastic spectators of any race I’ve done...awesome expo...beautiful city...had complete strangers come up to me after the race that wanted to shake my hand and congratulate me. It was incredible and I can’t wait to go back!

Things Done Right:
hmmm...I think the calamari after the race was a good choice. Staying at the downtown Hostel was very cool...packed with runners from all over the world! Mad props to my hommies David, Frank, Karl and Simon.

Things Done Wrong:
went out a little quick-
not enough Gatorade before the race-
didn’t stop for smooches/hugs from the wellseley girls-
too much time spent on my feet the day before the race-
should have mixed a little water with the E-gel in my flask...poor form during photo opportunities...

Any Other Stuff:

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Albuquerque Tricentenial 1/2 marathon - Albuquerque NM - April 16, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2 hours
Results: 2 hours 14 minutes
Website: http://

General Summary:
The race was part of potential relocation trip. All on pavement, which zapped my energy.

Things Done Right:
Last half was ten minutes better than the first, in an attempt to get off the pavement faster. Found out I felt pretty good after running 100 miles two weeks earlier.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran on pavement for 13 miles. I found myself wondering why I was doing this, and was in a pretty bad mood throughout the whole thing.

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Greenland Trail 25k/50k - Greenland exit off of I 25 - April 16, 2005

Greenland Trail 50k - Greenland exit off of I 25 - April 16, 2005
Karen Brennan reports:
Distance: 50k
Goal: finish
Results: finished in 5 hrs
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
The conditions were very nice on the trail considering there was 2 feet of snow on it the week prior. There were 4 different distances with the 50k being the longest. The 50k course was a 4 lap trip on the Greenland trail.

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated while running and ran faster on the down and dry (not muddy!) flat areas. Chatted with other runners and had fun.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have done a better job with fueling towards the end and had more to drink/eat right after the race. Should have stretched more right after as later I was feeling more sore than I expected!

Any Other Stuff:
The race had a good turnout for all the different distances which was nice to see as it was the first year of this event. There is definitely some room for improvement but I think that is normal with the first year of an event. It was well marked and an ATV drove on the course the day before which made it real helpful in the areas where there was still deep snow. I thought there would be more choices of fuel at the aid stops but the m&m’s were a nice treat. Very foggy for the first lap which I thought was real cool as you could only see the people right in front of you, by the third and fourth lap the sun was shining an the temp. was just right-not too hot, not too cold.


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Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 50k
Goal: 4hr 45m
Results: 49 Jungbauer Jason Manitou Springs CO 31 21/26 M 5:45:01
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
A four loop course at Greenland open space north of Monument. Due to the 3ft of snow from our blizzard the course was snowy and muddy although some areas were dry. The course had rolling hills and great views of Pikes Peak. By the last lap the trail was very sloppy and wet. Great weather for a race.

Things Done Right:
This was my first ultra so I did not know exactly what to expect. Plenty of training this year, long runs, speedwork, good taper. Hit my pace for the first 2 laps, 1hr 9min for the first one and 1 hr 11min for the second.

Things Done Wrong:
I have been fighting a bad toe injury for a couple of weeks and thought it was healed up enough to do this run. Unfortunately as I came to the turn around for the 1st lap my toe started to hurt and as I hit the top of the first hill on the second lap I knew I was in trouble. I managed to keep my pace for the second lap but as I started the third lap I could feel my toe moving around very unnaturally and it “popped” every step I took which forced me to change my stride and then I was getting pain all the way to my knee and in my hip and knee on my other leg. Quitting sounded like an excellent idea since the pain was terrible, I knew I had no shot of reaching my time goal and my goal of running the whole course was also gone. Luckily a few encouraging words and some pain killers from a volunteer along the course helped me to change my mind (thanks Gina!), and the encouragement of seeing my family at the turn around gave me enough motivation to finish.

Any Other Stuff:
This was a little tougher course than I had expected it to be since the elevation gain was only +500ft.

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Break 5 hours
Results: 4:39:32
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
Lots of fun. The snow the eek prior and the warm temps during the week led to mud, packed snow and more mud as the day warmed up.

Things Done Right:
Started out conservatively and ran my own pace. Ran negative split on second 25K.

Consumed the right amount of liquids and electrolyte replacements.

Trained right through the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing.

Any Other Stuff:
First time this race was put on.

RDs did a good job. Nice course, even though it was 4 loops. Water, gatorade and good gel packets at 2 aid stations. Pizza and other goodies at the end.

Good race for first time ultra.

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Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: 1:30 (unrealistic)
Results: 1:55
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
The 25K race began at 7:20, 20 minutes after the 50K, and 10 minutes after the 37.5K race had begun. We ran south into a slight but bracingly cold wind and mostly uphill, much of the way in slushy snow or mud to the 3.5M aid station (one of only 3 for the 15.5M distance). A slower 37.5K runner positioned himself solidly in front of the water table and I fumbled the cup as I tried to reach around him. After some more slushy uphill we circled back on the loop in the direction of the starting line. Now we enjoyed downhill running with the wind at our backs. I accelerated and gained two places, moving from 6th place to 4th place by the end of the first loop. At the aid station I asked for water, but got Gatorade--the only fluids I had taken so far. Now as we turned into the wind again the fog had lifted. As I struggled up to the 3.5M aid station I lost three places, moving back to 7th place. At this the third and final aid station I asked for water and the volunteer held out two cups, saying “water, Gatorade "--to which I yelled which one is water! I finished in 1:55+. after a 55:30 first loop.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t run much in the week leading up to the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Gave in mentally on the second loop--lost time.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice course. Two loops is enough though.

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Lori Hawkins reports:
Distance: 25k
Goal: 3 hrs
Results: 3 hrs 6 min

General Summary:
Gee, my first race report (due to the longest race run in 20+ years) and I can’t get it done on time. Great race, weird conditions (foggy one lap, clear second time around), close to town but in a location I’ve never been to before.

Things Done Right:
Trained with Incline Club, much better shape (and less weight) than in the fall. Tapered, hydrated, dressed, and ate right.

Things Done Wrong:
Had an off day. Maybe went out too fast. First lap felt great, comfortably pushing it. Second lap fell apart, walked as much as ran.

Any Other Stuff:
Very proud of my recovery. Legs felt great the next day, though back and feet were sore. I guess the long runs are paying off :)

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Moab 25K - Moab, UT - April 15, 2005

Joe and Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 15.1 miles
Goal: finish
Results: completed the race in pretty good shape

General Summary:
beautiful morning run thru the desert

Things Done Right:
plenty hydrated, thankful for lots of sunscreen

Things Done Wrong:
need new shoes (both of us)

Any Other Stuff:
had a great run and finished together. new course this year and was very well organized. Loved the early start. a little hot towards the end of the race.


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Umstead 100 - Umstead State Park, Raleigh NC - April 2-3, 2005

Umstead 100 - Umstead State Park, Raleigh NC - April 2 & 3 2005
Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: under 27 hours
Results: about 27 hour 47 minutes
Website: http://ncroadrunners.org

General Summary:
The Umstead 100 is a very runnable loop course. An excellent well organized race, good for a first time 100, or a first 100 of the year. This year there were only 8 loops, with a little more climbing than last year.

Things Done Right:
Kept stuff down. Raw foods really helped, along with taking digestive enzymes to help with the cabs. Took NO Hammer Gel, which has become way too sweet for me. Protein taken during the race paid off big-time later on and after the race, as the legs felt strong throughout. The last loop was faster than the two before it. Carried LOTS of rain gear, and had three other pairs of shoes, which I used, because my feet blistered badly in the 12 hours of rain and cold fronts that poured during the first 12 hours of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Jet lagged. I felt it badly after 10 at night, until it got light the next day. I almost fell in a ditch, turned out the headlamp I was wearing was making me dizzy, so I just turned it off, and ran with my pacer, who was great. Even a cold wet trail seemed appealing to sleep on for about 5 hours.

Any Other Stuff:
I won the “pissing contest” between my pacer, and another unfortunate runner who happen to run with us for a few hours. Somehow the cool night air has a way of doing that to me. The guys appeared really threatened by my natural ability, so not to be undone, they drank up at the aid stations, and outdid me during the morning hours. That’s what I love about this sport. Where else can you have a pissing contest for 8 hours with someone who was once a complete stranger, and subsequently make a new friend?

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28th Annual Capitol 10,000 - Austin, Texas - April 3, 2005

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: sub 50
Results: 50:34
Website: http://www.statesman.com/sports/content/cap10k/

General Summary:
13,000 participants, many in costumes, running up Congress Avenue and hilly streets just west of downtown, finishing on the shores of Town Lake. Clear skies and temps in the 50s and 60s.

Things Done Right:
Took the time to enjoy the trip and visit with old friends in Houston and in Austin.

Things Done Wrong:
Lack of sleep leading up to race day. Overslept morning of the race. Inadequate warm up. Burned off most of my adrenalin making it to the starting line on time. Got caught up in the excitement and went out too fast. Unable to loosen up tight muscles during 5th and 6th miles.

Any Other Stuff:
Completed 28th straight Capitol 10,000 — which is sponsored by the local newspaper — the Austin American-Statesman. The initial race had a 55 minute cut-off in order to receive a race shirt. I’ve managed to run 49 minutes or better 24 times and have always managed to finish under the 55 minute standard imposed in the first running.

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The Platte River Half Marathon - Littleton, CO - April 3, 2005

Theresa Pitman reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: use it as part of my 20 mile long run
Results: 1:49, right on with my marathon goal pace
Website: http://platteriverhalf.com

General Summary:
Very flat course until the end. Very pretty along the Platte River on a nicely paved trail. I ran 30 minutes before and 40 minutes after to get in my long run for the Salt Lake City marathon on April 23, 2005. I ended up running the race at my marathon goal pace of 8:19. So hopefully with a good taper I can do that pace in 3 weeks.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
Great dri-fit long sleeved t-shirt, finish line cookout and train ride back to the start.
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Barry Smith reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 1:35
Results: 1:36

General Summary:
Very nicely organized and supported with a great finish line meal. A band played but only for a short time. I’ll be back.

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Run to the Sun - Kahului, Hawaii (Maui) - March 26, 2005

Mike Shafai reports:
Distance: 36 Mile Relay (12 miles per runner)
Goal: Have fun a get a cool t-shirt
Results: Had fun, got a cool t-shirt, and a very cool medal
Website: http://www.virr.com/run_2_sun.html.

General Summary:
Run to the Sun is a 36 mile run from Kahului (near the Maui Airport) to the top of Haleakala (which means “House of the Sun” in Hawaiian). The course is entirely paved and is run along the steepest paved road in America. The race is entirely uphill, beginning at sea level and climbing to a summit elevation of 10053 ft.

Runners can either do it solo, or do it as a 3-person relay. Because I’m a wuss, I opted for the relay (I was also recovering from my marathon the weekend before). The race director was kind enough to connect me with two other runners seeking relay partners. One woman was from Alaska, also on vacation in Maui with her spouse and two kids. The other woman was a local runner. She was also a board member of the Valley Isle Road Runners (who organized the event), which was nice since she knew the area, the course, and many of the people involved in the race.

Things Done Right:
Since the goal was to just have fun, that was the main focus. I got to drive the shuttle van (until it was my turn to run).

The race started at 4:30AM, which meant getting up at 3AM. Since I was still on California/Colorado Time (somewhere in between the two), this was not an issue for me.

Our Alaska teammate got to start it off. It was absolutely pouring at the start, and of course, it was pitch black. I felt sorry for her as she headed off down the dark road into the sugar cane fields. My other partner and I drove to the relay hand-off spot and drank hot coffee in the dry car :)

Although we started at 4:30AM, it wasn’t my turn to run until around 9:15AM. My teammates and I decided that I should get the last two legs, which covered the higher elevations. I started at around 6500 feet and ran around 12 miles to the finish.

Although my legs were minorly sore from the marathon the weekend prior, they seemed to hold up just fine for the shorter distance. It felt like a faster-paced IC Sunday run.

After running for over a week at sea level, it actually felt great to run in the cooler air up top. I ended up passing a bunch of runners during my leg, most of whom were “sea level dwellers".

Our team ended up getting first place for “Mixed Relay.” More importantly, we all had a blast.

If you’re planning a trip to Hawaii during Spring Break time in future years, I recommend trying to work this into your schedule. The views and the scenery are incredible!

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing... had a lot of fun. The weather could have cooperated more, since it was cloudy and rainy during much of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Saw lots of rainbows on the way up the mountain. We also saw quite a few ‘nene’ once we got into the park. (Haleakala is a National Park). Nene is a rare type of Hawaiian goose that is on the endangered species list.


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Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 36.2 miles
Goal: 9:50
Results: 9:58
Website: http://www.virr.com

General Summary:
Excellent race with wonderful support and many well stocked aid stations. Sea level to 10,000 feet, only one hill in the entire race! Much like Pikes Peak. Started off rainy and cold (relative to life in Hawaii of course) and stayed that way for most of the race.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t carry my entire stash of running gear in my camelbak. ate as I ate when i trained, in fact, did everything the same as I trained so it was like a really long training run.

Things Done Wrong:
didn’t grab my hat and gloves for the top 3,000 foot elevation gain because we were told it was warm and not very windy up above 8,000 feet, they were wrong!

Any Other Stuff:
This is a great first ultra for anyone wishing to try. The Valley Isle Road Runners and the Hawaiian Ultra Running Team put on a great race, very low-key with minimal stress. Nice shirt and finisher award. The award is hand made by a local pottery artist.

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Tri-State - Utah, Arizona, finished in Mesquite Nevada - March 26, 2005

Joe and Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2 mile
Goal: Improve over time in New Orleans
Results: Improved by 13 minutes

General Summary:
Early morning start. Bus left Mesquite at 4:00 am Mesquite time. Full moon rising over desert was a lifetime memory. Paved the whole way but the desert was in full bloom and green for the first time in local memory.

Things Done Right:
Been training consistently and trying to get the weight down.

Things Done Wrong:
The Friday night buffet at the casino was probably not a good idea but man it was good.

Any Other Stuff:
We are attempting to run 12 marathons in 12 months and better our time each race. So far so good.

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Andy Dillon reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: 4 hours
Results: 3:53:50
Website: http://www.tristatemarathon.com/index.cfm

General Summary:
My first marathon — this one appealed because it was early in the season, the weather would be cool, and there was also a half marathon which Jane wanted to do. In my only other attempt at a full marathon (American Discovery Trail in 2002) I dropped out at mile 21 — this time I HAD to finish!

Things Done Right:
Trained primarily on the Santa Fe Trail, parking at Woodmen and running North through the Air force Academy. I built up the weekly long run from 12 miles up to a longest run of 23 miles, adding a couple of miles per week. This certainly helped.

I set a pace and stuck to it — 9 minute mile pace. The first few miles were downhill, and I was actually going at 8 minute mile pace, but it felt about the right level of intensity. Later there were some uphill miles, and these took 10 minutes each, so it all worked out.

Towards the end there were some uphill sections, and I found myself passing everybody around me with ease. This was certainly Incline Club training kicking in — it was a great feeling!

Things Done Wrong:
Ended up eating a huge pasta meal rather late the night before the race. This was not ideal, but when you are staying in hotels it isn’t always easy to eat what you want when you want it!

Any Other Stuff:
This was a low-key but fun race — only about 150 people in total in the Marathon and about the same in the half marathon. The half marathon started at the half way point of the course so everyone finished at the same place.

At the beginning it was cold and dark, and everyone sat around bonfires trying to stay warm. Then when the race started the sun rose over the mountains and it was pretty spectacular. Lots of people were saying it was the most scenic race they had ever done — I thought to myself they haven’t been to Colorado ...

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Ocean Drive Marathon - Cape May, New Jersey - March 20th, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 3hrs
Results: 3:02
Website: http://www.odmarathon.com/

General Summary:
The Ocean Drive Marathon is a point to point marathon running from the southernmost point of the New Jersey coast at Cape May northwards along the seashore to Sea Isle City. To my consternation after arriving in Cape May I realized that I had Inadvertently signed up to run two races last weekend: the first race was the marathon. The second was the race to the airport.

Normally marathons start somewhere between 0630 and 0730, so I had long ago booked the return flight from Philadelphia for 1345, thinking I’d have plenty of time to run the race, shower, and make my way from the New Jersey coast to the Philadelphia airport. It wasn’t until Friday when I re-checked the race web site that I noticed that the race start time was set for 0900. A quick check of mapquest.com showed that the time required to drive from the race ending point in Sea Isle City, NJ to the Philly airport would be 1 hour 18 minutes. Yikes! That meant that if I ran a 3 hour marathon, immediately jumped into the car and raced to the airport I’d have approximately twenty minutes to turn in the rental car, ride the shuttle to the airport, make it through security, and dash to the gate before the flight closed ten minutes before take off. To make a long story short, that’s exactly what we did. I ran a 3:02 marathon, was driving down the turnpike less than five minutes later, weaving in and out of traffic 80-85 MPH, pulled into the rental car dropoff area after 1 hour 8 minutes driving time, just made the shuttle as it pulled out, dashed to security (we had printed our boarding passes the day before) where for the first time in memory there was NO LINE--what luck! I had separated the problem items that normally catch me, like coins and bottle openers, and we sailed through easily. As we approached the gate, a mere 100 yards further, we heard with relief “This is the final boarding call for flight 5646 to St Louis".

Things Done Right:
Kept putting on the brakes to ensure I didn’t blow up and could finish close to 3 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t check the starting time for the race before I bought my plane tickets.

Any Other Stuff:
Cape May is an attractive old-time resort town build in the Victorian Era. If you are going to run the marathon spend a few extra dollars to stay here.


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Ocean Drive 10 Miler - Cape May, NJ - March 20, 2005<

Rebekka Hannula reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 1:20
Results: 1:22:27
Website: http://odmarathon.com

General Summary:
A point to point 10 miler on a mostly flat course.

Things Done Right:
I kept a nice even pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Need to learn how to tie my shoes !Both shoes came undone. Should have trained harder.

Any Other Stuff:


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Queen Charlotte Classic - Marlborough Sound, South Island, New Zealand - March 19, 2005

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 44.3km (27.5mi), 4,900’ of climbing
Goal: Have fun. Get a good workout. Compete hard.
Results: 4:19:02. 2nd place. Had a good workout. Didn’t compete hard.
Website: http://www.coolrunning.co.nz/races/charlotte/index.html

General Summary:
When I was planning my honeymoon trip to New Zealand, of course I looked for races to do. I found this race and contacted the race directors. They were very helpful answering questions and letting me pay on race day. It was pre-registration only, but it’s hard getting NZ$ from here.

The race was in the middle of our 2-week trip. It gave us a chance to view the Marlborough Sound along one of the more popular tramping (NZ for trekking) tracks. We were going to do it as a relay, but my wife hurt her knee, so I decided to do it solo.

I came down with a cold earlier in the week, so I didn’t know how I would feel during the race. Thus, I started out conservatively.

I came through the first leg (of the relay), 20.7km, in 1:51. Surprisingly, I was told I was in 2nd place, about 8 min behind the leader. I knew that the 3rd place solo runner was just a minute or so behind me. I thought that if I picked up the pace a little, and the lead runner faded, I might be able to run him down.

I started a little harder on the second leg. I could still feel the effects of the cold and didn’t have a lot of energy. After about 2:45, at the one sections where you could see well ahead and behind, when it was clear that I hadn’t picked up any ground on the leader, and probably lost ground, and had built a big lead on the 3rd place runner, I decided to shut it down and just cruise easily to the finish. I walked the steep uphills. And, after twisting my ankle about 10 times, I even took it easy on the downhills.

About 1/2 — 3/4 mi from the finish, the first 2 relay runners caught me. They started the leg 2 runners en masse after I had come through. I let the first one go. When I heard the second one coming, I decided to see if I could hold him off. I consider myself a very good downhill runner, but he blew by me and was quickly out of sight. I don’t know whether they are just a lot better in NZ, or I didn’t have a lot of spare energy, or I couldn’t turn it on quickly after having turned it off for ~1:30.

One more note: Racing flats don’t work well on muddy trails. I was slipping and sliding down many of the steeper descents.

Things Done Right:
Started conservatively until I saw how I felt, after being sick during the week. Backed off when it was clear that I wasn’t going to win. I was in NZ to have fun. I didn’t want to get really sick or injured and ruin the rest of the vacation.

Things Done Wrong:
Get sick before the race.

Any Other Stuff:


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Catalina Island Marathon - Catalina Island CA - March 19, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish
Results: finished
Website: http://

General Summary:
I would definitely not recommend this to anyone running their first marathon. The course was beautiful, but unmarked. The front runners got lost. The aid stations were poor at best. Gatorade, water, Cliff shots, pretzel sticks, and gummy bears were about it, and you were lucky to get that depending on which aid station you were at.

Things Done Right:
Brought my own stuff. Didn’t aggravate any old injuries, since I am running the Umstead 100 in two weeks. Enjoyed the scenery, (translation: moved very slowly).

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
Race was way over priced for what you got: a cheap cotton shirt, and a cheap medal. I’ve done 50 and hundred milers where I’ve gotten way more, not that I run races for the “stuff.” It is nice, however, to get something decent for your efforts.

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Mike Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2M
Goal: 3:43:59
Results: 3:48:08
Website: http://www.pacificsportsllc.com

General Summary:
The course is a point to point race that winds from Two Harbors to Avalon. To get to the start line, runners take a ferry boat at 5AM to the other side of Catalina Island, then they run home.

The course is very hilly, about 95% trail, and typically offers great views of the Pacific. This year was a little different, given the fact that we were socked in with clouds and it rained for much of the race. Between miles 18 and 23, the mud became somewhat of a factor, because the rain came down harder on that side of the island (primarily because of the higher elevation in that area, which traps the clouds coming in from the west).

Overall, I had a blast and once again, I’m looking forward to next year. Catalina is definitely one of the funnest races on the planet, given its unique location, the wonderful scenery, and the laid back demeanor of the people who are attracted to this race.

Things Done Right:
I felt I was well-trained. I hydrated enough, got plenty of sleep, and ate a good breakfast.

Things Done Wrong:
I may have gone out too fast, too early, for the conditions. Through mile 19, I was on pace to finish in around 3:30, which would have placed me at 3rd in my age group (which is where I finished last year). Although I was well hydrated, my legs started cramping up when I hit the pavement section from mile 19-20. I had to stop and stretch several times and I had to slow down my pace. I ended up 5th in my age group and 35th overall, when at one point in the race, I was in 20th place overall. Bummer!

Any Other Stuff:
It was great to see fellow IC-ers, Bob McAndrews and Doug Laufer out there as well!

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Boston’s run to remember - Boston, MA - March 13, 2005

Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles (half marathon)
Goal: <1h45min (8 min pace)
Results: 1h44m17s
Website: http://www.bostonsruntoremember.org

General Summary:
A nice half marathon on the streets of Boston to honor fallen Police officers. Boston had a small winter storm the day before, so the roads were wet but runnable. The cool air was easy to breathe. 8000 people showed up to run. Way more than the race officials had anticipated but it the race went smoothly.

Things Done Right:
I paced myself very well. I wanted to complete the race in 8min/mile pace and ended up doing 7.58min/mile pace. Ate GU every half hour and brought my waist camelback so I did not have to stop at the aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Slept only 6 hours the night before. Did not run much in my new shoes before the race so I got blisters. I am always afraid to hit the wall and stay conservative too far into the race, which means I still have more to give at the finish. But I met my goal so I should not be sad.

Any Other Stuff:
A nice course running through parts of downtown Boston. Very flat with one big uphill and downhill. Used by many runners as a fitness check for Boston marathon.

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Ironman New Zealand - March 5, 2005

Ironman New Zealand Trip Report

Executive Summary: Ironman is hard. Minimal training makes it harder.
Food poisoning adds an optional degree of difficulty if so desired.
Incredible event any way you look at it.

Details: I’m certain there was an easier way to go about my 40th marathon
but none more memorable. I completed my first Ironman in anything but
record time. Ironman New Zealand is a first class event. It is staged in
Taupo on the northern edge of Lake Taupo which is located in the middle of
the northern island; very beautiful area. Awesome volunteers and atmosphere
for the event.

Lori, Kaitlin and I spent the entire week before the event in Taupo which is
highly recommended. I also spent a few of those days with food poisoning
four days out from race day. That is highly NOT recommended. I ended up in
the emergency room for 6 hours on Tuesday night with a two-liter IV drip for
dehydration. It took until mid-day Thursday to rid the bug from my upper
and lower GI tracts and so I got a late start on fueling for Saturday
morning and no training that last week.

I felt OK by race day but was a little nervous given the uncertainty of the
pre-race fueling and of course the unknown of the questionable training.
The pre-race Ironvirgins brief said 4 in 10 first-time Ironman athletes will
experience some sort of severe stomach problems due to improper and/or
inadequate fueling over the course of the day. The worst it got for me was
a severe headache for about 90 minutes at around the 6-hour mark. Aspirin
and more water took care of it. No stomach issues.

Of course I had my goal times that fell short of my actual times:
Swim (2.4M/3.8K): 1:20, 1:13
Bike (112M/180K): 6:30, 7:33
Run (26.2M/42K): 4:50, 4:52

I budgeted 10 minutes for each of the two transitions and my goal was to
break 13 hours. The swim went surprisingly well. First half split was 32
minutes. Goggles were knocked off at minute 53 and the last 20 minutes of
the swim deteriorated. (Open water navigation skills are weak. Must learn
to swim a straighter line.) Transition #1 was not what I would call speedy.
I’m still a rookie at getting the wetsuit off.

The bike event was my downfall. I was told during the pre-race brief that I
could expect several bad patches during the race and to just work through
it. I was fortunate. I had just one bad patch; it was called the bike
event. My first of two bike loops was at around 3:15 and the second loop
added almost an hour. It was ugly. I had a good 15-20 minutes of downtime
due to mechanical issues and who knows how long I was riding with a bad
(warped) wheel. Also since my longest training ride was only 80 miles, it
was no surprise that I faded badly after that point.

And then there were these mysterious noises coming from my front wheel that
really had me concerned. I asked the roaming mechanic guy to look into it
and he immediately diagnosed the problem as a Power Bar wrapper jammed up in
my brake calipers. (These guys are good.) I then moved on to another
challenging issue that just had to be resolved in the middle of the Ironman,
“How do I get these big, silly-looking reflectors off my wheels?” (I think
I was the only guy competing with wheel reflectors.) The mechanic just
broke them off. (Guess I won’t be using those any more.) It turns out I
had one tricked-out adolescent tri-bike.

The run started off pretty slow as I was already sort of mentally whipped
from a horrible bike ride. And it didn’t help that the dude who was helping
me get my running shoes on started massaging my feet. I just sat there and
burned 3 minutes on that foot rub. I felt like telling the guy, “I’ll DNF
right now if you can keep that massage going for an hour.” I finally
departed Transition #2 and I did OK on the run as I almost ran my goal pace
and my last 10K was my fastest 10K. My adjusted goal was to break 14 hours
and get to the finisher’s chute in time to find Lori and Kaitlin and carry
Kaitlin across the finish line. I was able to do so and it was a very
memorable final few minutes.

With respect to the “Training Program,” as it were, I decided early on all I
could devote was about 10-11 hours per week. Given the job, an infant and a
desire to spend at least a few hours per week with Lori, this was all I
could manage. I know that most folks with a goal of 12-13 hours trained
between 16-22 hours per week. My high-water mark was 12.5 hours two weeks
out from the race. I wasn’t too worried about the swim or run, but I felt I
hadn’t really paid my dues on the bike. I never did any weight training.

All in all I was very happy with my time and could expect no better given
the circumstances. I was thrilled to be able to start that morning and even
more happy to just finish. It was an awesome experience. However, as I was
not happy with the circumstances, I may just have to consider another
Ironman. Now it’s just a matter of Lori and I agreeing on my exact verbiage
before this Ironman. Did I “promise” I would never do another Ironman again
or did I just say that it was very unlikely? I’ll let you know.

Lori and Kaitlin were the best support crew ever before, during, and after
the event. Sharing the Ironman experience and exploring the North Island
with them was great. We loved NZ and hope to get back to visit the South
Island one day since we’ll be staying in the neighborhood. We met some
great people down there and the Kiwis are wonderful people.

Progress on my 50-states goal will continue to be slow for the next two
years as I was selected for Squadron Command in Guam and leave Hawaii this
summer and travel further from the mainland. I’ll have to work on my
7-continents goal. China’s Great Wall Marathon is next. Recovery
continues. Basic course info and tips below.

Aloha,
Craig

Ironman New Zealand — 5 Mar 05
Entry Fee — $360 ($420 late entry)
Link — http://www.ironman.co.nz/
Swim Course — Out and back along the shoreline. Crystal clear water and
pretty calm on race morning. The water was a little cold (~68 degrees) but
it was much warmer than last year when it was in the 50’s! Everyone wore
wetsuits. I managed with a sleeveless wetsuit.
Bike Course — Two 56 mile loops. About 25-30 miles of hills per loop.
Nothing too severe, but sizeable if you’ve trained exclusively on pancake
flat terrain as I did.
Run Course — Two out-and-back tracks along the shoreline. Again, I expected
flat along the shoreline but it was hillier than expected. Over half of the
course had some sort of incline.
Expo — This over-compensated for every reasonable and moderately priced expo
event I ever attended. There wasn’t much to offer and everything was
ridiculously priced.
Goodie Bag — Not much for $360. Swim cap and goggles.
Course Fuel — PRO 4 provided both the electrolyte drinks on the bike course
and drinks and gels along the run. Pretty horrible tasting stuff. I should
have brought more Gatorade with me. I ended up buying Powerade powder and
stopped to mix it with water along the bike route. (You can’t buy Gatorade
in NZ)
Medal — Decent. Maybe in the top 15 of the marathon medals I received.
T-Shirt — Decent long sleeve finishers baseball T-shirt.
Crowds — Pretty good in Taupo itself. Not much elsewhere.
Pre- and post-race dinners — Both were very nicely done affairs and included
in entry for athletes but expensive for guests.
Start temp — Air temperature was probably in the 50’s. First part of bike
through forested area was FREEZING; frozen toes and chattering teeth.
Second half of bike and first half of run was hot. Cooled down quickly once
the sun set.
Overall impression — Absolutely a first class event. Can’t compare to other
Ironman events (yet) but I was told IM NZ was one of the best out there.
A few additional tips for your next Ironman:
- Don’t trust that little 5-inch course profile map on the internet to give
you a good idea of the amount of hills that are in store for you.
- Pray that Abba’s “Dancing Queen” is not the last song you hear as you
leave town on your bike with nothing but solitude for the next few hours.
- When you completely lose focus on the bike, focus on the indigenous farm
animals if you need a good diversion. There were thousands of sheep along
the way doing some interesting synchronized grazing thing. Every last one
was facing due south. The cows were less synchronized.
- Finally, don’t do cold leftover Chinese take-out chicken in the days
leading up to the event.

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Old Pueblo 50 - Sonoita AZ - March 5, 2005

Gordon Neal reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish
Results: dropped at 33 miles
Website: http://ultrazone.us/J100

General Summary:
The race directors have turned a small race that I regularly participated in and even directed a couple of times into one of the premier midwinter trail runs in the Rockies. I bought my tickets to do this run last October and started training in mid December. When training with the Incline club on January 2nd I slipped on the Barr trail and landed flat on my back. On previous years I had always used shoe screws. At the end of last year I threw away the shoes that I had put screws in so I would be forced to get new screws this year. I kept meaning to buy them but I found I was always thinking about this at 6AM on Sunday mornings. Although I knew I had hurt myself pretty bad when I fell I was able to get myself home under my own power. When I got home my wife looked at me and asked what was wrong. I told her that I had better go get x-rayed. The x-rays showed that I had 4 broken ribs. I missed work for a week and slept sitting up for 2 weeks. I didn’t run a step for a month. In the 9 weeks before this 50 mile race I only got a total of 76 miles of running in. A week before the race I decided that even if it was going to be the slowest race of my life I was going to try it anyways. The race started relatively warm but was cloudy enough that heat wasn’t going to be a problem. I had forgotten how rough the trail was in places and knowing that a fall could easily re-break my ribs, I ran extremely cautiously. I reached the 25 mile mark almost exactly one hour slower than the last time I ran this course and was debating if I wanted to run into the dark hours. The race has a 15 hour cutoff so I don’t think that was going to be a problem. About a half mile after I left the 25 mile aid station. we got hit by a cold soaking rainshower and I knew I was going to be quitting. From here on out I started really enjoying the run. I knew that the 33 mile aid station was only about 3 miles from the start/finish line so I could cut out there and finish about the same time as the front runners. The showers kept cycling through with increasing intensity. A particularly heavy shower hit about an hour after I finished. If I had continued I would have been running through a cold wet night and would probably not been in any condition to get to work on Monday. I think I will be trying again next year but without the fall on the Barr Trail.

Things Done Right:
Decide to try to run any ways. It is a beautiful course and I really enjoyed what I was able to run. When I came to the decision at 25 miles that I was not going to finish, I really started to enjoy myself and the country I was running through.

Things Done Wrong:
Not used shoe screws when running on the Barr trail in January.

Any Other Stuff:
If you are looking for a good ultra in the early March timeframe I highly recommend this run. It has grown to around 125 runners, but it looks like it may fill early in upcoming years.

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: under 11 hours
Results: 12:28:?? (injured)
Website: http://ultrazone.us/J100

General Summary:
OP50 is a great race. Well organized by ultrarunners Duane and Julie Arter. Very well marked! Even I couldn’t get lost. This race has everything. Beautiful views, wild flowers galore, wild life, rocks, stream beds, stream crossings, valleys, canyons, long climbs, quad-busting downhills, a nice finishers dinner, a beautiful buckle, and a cactus! No stupid hoopla either!

Things Done Right:
Kept going. My ankle hurt so bad I was reduced to a 2 mph pace for about two hours. It hurt at the start, but the pain diminished when I ran, (when it hurts, speed up!)but on the difficult, rocky downhills I had to slow down, (wouldn’t want to fall and break a nail)and the pain started kicking in. Then it started to hail and thunder. At least hail bounces off you and doesn’t soak you.At the 33 mile aid station I almost quit, but a former fellow Badwater runner was working the aid station and encouraged me to keep going. “You have 15 hours!” he said. Half a mile down the road the pain just vanished. I’d never had anything like that happen before. My ankle has hurt for two months, and then poof! no pain. It still doesn’t hurt. So I guess there was an important lesson to be learned; ultras are unpredictable! Both the good times and the bad times can change in a heartbeat, so just keep on going!

Things Done Wrong:
Wasted emotional energy getting mad because I wasn’t going to make it under 11 hours.

Any Other Stuff:
The digestive enzymes I took with the carbs I ate really helped me digest food. I learned if food is cooked and processed in temperatures over 118 degrees all the digestive enzymes are killed, making it harder for your stomach to process the food, so it just tends to sit there, causing gas and bloating and worse. I never had to stop and “make brownies” (or pudding in some cases) during the race.

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Mardi Gras - New Orleans, LA - February 27, 2005

Joe and Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2 mile
Goal: finish quicker than the last one
Results: finished quicker than the last one
Website: http://

General Summary:
Flat and at sea level. all pavement but an interesting run thru the historic areas of New Orleans. Weather was great for running. about 60 degrees, slight drizzle for first 13 miles, and overcast for remainder. Started and finished in the sugardome. lots of food and music after the race.

Things Done Right:
Went there to enjoy ourselves and have another interesting run in a new city.

Things Done Wrong:
As usual the pavement beat up our legs but we will still continue to train on trails.

Any Other Stuff:
Mardi Gras was over but there were plenty of people who didn’t get the memo. The crowd was in full party attire as were many of the runners.

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Lake Hodges 50km - Lake Hodges CA - February 26, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: 5 1/2 hours
Results: 5 hours 16 minutes/3rd over all, 1st in age group
Website: http://surf.com

General Summary:
It was very humid, because of all the rain SoCal has been getting, along with it being along a lake. The race started an hour and a half late, and was poorly marked, causing me to get lost and come in third instead of second. There was also lots of shoe-sucking mud to contend with.

Things Done Right:
Switched to drinking Succeed! which is less sweet than other electrolye mixes, and has much less stomach discomfort. Have incorporated raw foods and enzymes into my diet, which helped me maintain my energy levels. I also wore pink shorts and an IC shirt, which seemed to help. Despite the poor marking and late start due to the late arrival of the RD, I still managed a PR.

Things Done Wrong:
Got lost twice, losing about 10 minutes, due to no markings at critical runs or mismarkings, causing me and other runners to waste valuable time. When you pay good money for your entry and motel, gas and food, it really ticks me off. I chafed really bad, because I am not used to running in humid conditions.

Any Other Stuff:
Guys hate being passed by women in pink shorts.

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Myrtle Beach Marathon - Myrtle Beach, SC - February 19, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: under 3 hrs
Results: 2hrs56min
Website: http://www.mbmarathon.com/

General Summary:
Myrtle Beach is a bit too built up for my tastes. Rebekka and I had booked a “package tour” through Travelocity.com. We had thought it was a “great deal,” but after finding our Holiday Inn was some 20+ miles from the beach, and found ourselves woken up at midnight to a fire alarm and noisy TVs, we opted out and migrated instead to the seashore, where we found a one bedroom oceanfront condo with kitchen for a mere $45/nt. There was still noise though, here it came from the low riders cruising Ocean Blvd and reving their engines. The second night we moved our bed from the back room to the ocean side and closed off all doors which made things much quieter. All in all, too much noise and bussle for our tastes....

It was very cold at race start at 0630. I think the temperature was 28F. This was my 65th marathon though, and I maintained my tradition by wearing only a singlet and shorts. It took a good five miles before I warmed up. Four runners were treated for hypothermia.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy from the git-go.

Things Done Wrong:
nothing

Any Other Stuff:
The course is flat and fast. With half marathoners, relayers and marathoners all starting together it was confusing and I never knew who I was racing against until the half marathoners dropped off halfway through the course. At the first relay handoff point a young hotdog in green shorts burst forward zipping in and out, weaving through us steadily paced marathoners in some big hurry. He quickly moved out 200 yards ahead. I thought to myself that I would probably see him again. Sure enough, three miles later he came into view. As I passed him I said “I thought I’d see you again. It’s all about pace. You took off like a bat out of hell, now look at you.” He replied “I’ll get you.” To which I responded, “Come on then. I’m running the marathon. Let’s go. Run with me.” To which he could only splutter, “I’m 17 years old. I’ll be running with you. Just wait.” I have to hand it to him. I sure hope he sticks it out and makes good on his threat.

My first mile was 6:15 and that proved to be my fastest. I kept every mile under 7 minutes until mile 23 which was 7:02. My slowest mile was 7:15, so I was satisfied with my run. I wanted to go below 3 hours and I achieved that. I didn’t hit the wall--my slow down was on account of the inevitable shortening of the stride that comes at the end of the 26.2 mile ordeal.

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Dasani Half-Marathom - Myrtle Beach, SC - February 19, 2005

Rebekka Hannula reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: sub. 2:00
Results: 1:48:28
Website: www.mbmarathon.com

General Summary:
This was my first half-marathon so I did not know what to expect. The race started at 6:30 with the temperature a balmy 28 degrees! The course was flat and basically very easy to run. I DID NOT WALK.

Things Done Right:
Well hydrated, thanks to Steve B. Long sleeves. A big tree for a pre- race pit stop!

Things Done Wrong:
I should have pushed harder.

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14th Annual Austin Freescale Marathon - Austin, Texas - February 13, 2005

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 4:40
Results: 5:59:17
Website: http://www.freescaleaustinmarathon.com/home.asp

General Summary:
Beautiful, point-to-point course from 13 miles north of downtown Austin through neighborhoods, the UT campus, past the capitol, and around Town Lake.

Things Done Right:
Ran and visited with several old running buddies. Maintained a sub-10 minute pace for 16 miles. Rendered aid to a good friend who had become quite ill and was unable to continue.

Things Done Wrong:
Took over an hour and 20 minutes to cover miles 17 to 19 and wait for assistance for my friend.

Any Other Stuff:
Hilly course; net downhill for the first half. Weather was very warm and sunny ... mid 70’s, windy and humid!

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New World Snowshoe Championship - Luck, Wisconsin - February 12, 2005

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K is the national qualifier (5K and 20K distances also available)
Goal: Finish top 10 overall; Qualify for nationals: shoot for around 45 minutes
Results: 4th overall; 1st in Age Group; Qualified with a 46:15
Website: http://home.centurytel.net/luckrunningclub (info) or www.myvira.com (results)

General Summary:
Part ski trail and part golf course, the groomed race route has been described as the most beautiful in the Midwest. Rolling hills and the winding trail make for a challenging snowshoe course. Also beautiful scenery along the river valleys on the drive to the race!

This year I was becoming very concerned while driving north from Iowa as the snow was steadily disappearing. It did not seem possible that enough snow would remain to conduct a snowshoe race. “Luck"ily, there was just enough snow in “Luck” for the race to proceed as designed. There was adequate snow for the most part, yet several sections did include ice and/or bare ground and was difficult to maintain any form or rhythm.

I eventually lost contact with the three runners ahead of me and settled in to a relaxed pace, by myself, seemingly alone in the woods.

The runner in second place was phenomenal at 60 years of age. Jim Graupner is one of the top age group runners in Minnesota, setting numerous age group records and acquiring high overall placements in road races!

The race is one of the regional qualifiers for the USSSA National Race, this year in Anchorage, Alaska.

Things Done Right:
Able to train for many more days this year due to snow conditions. Included some specificity of training to cover poor snow conditions and some hill repeats!

Got out of the start area relatively quickly to avoid the congestion created by the narrow groomed area and large number of racers (e.g. young participants in the 5K that start at the front regardless of ability!)

Things Done Wrong:
Dinner in Stillwater, Minnesota the night before included an entree that was much richer(fancy sauces etc. on Tilapia) than what I would typically consume the night before a race. However, it was also to serve as “Valentine’s Day” for my wife so what could I do?

Any Other Stuff:
Snowshoe races are a BLAST! I really enjoy the competition and effort as well as the camaraderie following the event.


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Pemberton 50km - Fountain Hills AZ - Feb. 6, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: break 5:53:??
Results: 5:42:??

General Summary:
The Pemberton 50km is run on the same course as the Javvelin Jundred Ultra. I was in AZ to see an alignment specialist, so I decided to stay and run the race too. It was two loops of 15.3 miles, with aid stations about every five miles.

Things Done Right:
Rarely walked. Took no advil. Had a great time.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have went out harder. Hopefully when my hips are in in alignment again I’ll be able to, without IT pain. Hammergel disagreed with me too, which added to my time, but it was a confidence builder for the Wasatch 100, which I got accepted into, which will be held in September in Utah.

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Las Vegas International Marathon - las Vegas, NV - January 30, 2005

Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:11:00
Results: 3:07:18
Website: http://www.lvmararthon.com

General Summary:
This is a very fast course that starts in Jean, NV and runs towards Vegas. There isn’t much to see except the interstate and the desert. At the start the temperature was a bit cold and never got much warmer than 50 degrees. I thought this was perfect running temperature. The wind started around mile 9 and really picked up around mile 17. About the last 3 miles the wind is at your back and made the finish easier.

Things Done Right:
I had an elaborate mile pacing strategy, but when the race started I threw that out. Basically, I tried to run a consistent pace throughout the race. There are times when you feel good and want to increase your pace and put some time in the “bank,” but I refrained from that. One of my goals was to finish strong and for the first time in a road marathon I finished strong and didn’t fall apart. I also made sure that I hydrated well and took gels.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much really went wrong. The only thing that I would change would be to start closer to the front. I started in the middle of the pack and had to run on the shoulder of the road for the first mile.

Any Other Stuff:
The course starts in Jean, NV and runs on an old highway towards Vegas. The first 8.5 miles are slightly uphill with the next 9 miles slightly downhill and the rest of the course is FLAT. The race finishes near the Las Vegas airport. I didn’t feel that the race was all that well organized. There were no gels given out at any of the aid stations(I always bring my own anyway) and no food after the race. The post race party was later in the day and it was an additional charge.


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Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:40
Results: 3:42:25
Website: http://www.lvmararthon.com

General Summary:
The Las Vegas Marathon is the flattest marathon I have ever run. They bus you out 26.2 miles and you run back. For 22 miles, you never even turn a corner or round a curve, its just running straight on the old LA Highway. Once we crested what was the last of the gradual hills at about mile 9, it was flat or slightly downhill from there. Unfortunately, that was also the last hill that blocked the ugly headwind from hitting us full force until we finally turned at mile 22.

Things Done Right:
I feel like I trained well for the off-season. I did speedwork (yasso 800s) for 10 weeks, I did about 6 long runs of 18 plus, I tapered fairly well (as well as i can expect from myself). Hydrated well throughout the race. Finished very strong, I think the last 5k was my fastest miles.

Things Done Wrong:
I usually go out to fast. I was so aware of this fact that I made it my goal to go out as slow as I could. So slow, in fact, that my first mile was a 9:33 and by the time I hit the 10 mile mark, I was almost 4 minutes off my goal time. Stupid, I know. When I started to push it, the headwinds kicked up and it was not to be.

Any Other Stuff:
I ran my first negative split marathon despite the headwinds (This was I am sure due to the fact that I had all this energy from not going out fast enough), but once again missed by goal time by over 2 minutes. I have a habit of making poor decisions like this in marathons, this being my third one that I have missed 3:40 by less than 3 minutes. But other than that, its Vegas. I Love Vegas! If you want a fast course, sign up and pray for no headwinds.

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4:30
Results: 5:21
Website: http://www.lvmararthon.com

General Summary:
Nice flat course. Didn’t expect 19 miles of blowing wind. Plenty of aid stations along the way. To long a wait seating in the bus 1:50 hour. NO TRAILS.

Things Done Right:
Good carb load. Fluids and gels used.

Things Done Wrong:
If you haven’t been to Las Vegas before, the place is a whole different world, too much walking with all the things to see. Also, to many late nights.

Any Other Stuff:
Expect wind or rain on race day, good qualifier for Boston.

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Florida marathon - Clearwater Fl - January 23, 2005

Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2 mile
Goal: finish without leg becoming a pogo stick
Results: not quite

General Summary:
Temp was not bad at about 50 degrees but the wind was relentless. Once again the pavement proved to be hard on the legs.

Things Done Right:
I didn’t overtrain.

Things Done Wrong:
I need to lose some weight.

Any Other Stuff:
This was my 32nd marathon, 11th state

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Calico Trail 50km - Calico, CA - January 16th, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: finish
Results: 6:45
Website: http://calicotrailrun.org

General Summary:
CTR 50km started in a ghost town outside of Barstow CA. Many runners showed up, because the Avalon 50 miler on Catalina Island the week before was cancelled due to all the severe storms. Parts of the course were 9 feet under water and boats over to the island were canelled. This was the first annual CTR, and many people were pleasantly surprised.

Things Done Right:
Went out SLOOOOW and didn’t aggravate my IT band which had been hurting since last October. Have been using Succeed! for drink, with good results, no bloating.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
The course was a lot harder than I thought. The first 16 miles were mostly climb, followed by a steep, rocky, scree like section. It you have ever driven by Barstow CA, which is the nearest town to Calico, it’s like, “yuck, this place sucks.” Not a place you would want to stay. But back in the mountains it was very nice. Lots of wild flowers blooming, lots of different colored rocks and mountains, and you got to run through tunnels. The race was very well organized too. Definitely gets the Princess seal of approval.
33rd Annual Houston-HP Marathon - Houston, Texas - January 16, 2005

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 5:00
Results: 4:50:39
Website: http://www.houstonmarathon.com/

General Summary:
City-wide course, starting and finishing in downtown Houston.

Things Done Right:
Maintained 10-minute pace for 16 miles. Completed 17th Houston Marathon.

Things Done Wrong:
Once again, shins gave out, this time @ mile 16. Still haven’t figured out solution. In order to keep training without aggravating shins, reduced daily mileage, no long runs, starting to affect endurance!

Any Other Stuff:
Predominantly flat course with lots of concrete. Well organized. Great weather ... 40’s to low 50’s.

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HURT 100 - Honoulu, Hawaii (sort of) - January 15-16, 2005

HURT 100 - Honoulu, Hawaii (sort of) - January 15-16, 2005
Neal Taylor reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: 36 hour cutoff
Results: 33hr 4min
Website: http://www.hurthawaii.com

General Summary:
Not one to write up much of a race report normally, I thought this race was worthy. This was one tough run.

The Incline Club was well represented. Without any coordination between us, Teresa, Tom & Laura Kelecy, and myself all wore our IC shirts throughout the day. Took about two hours of scrubbing to clean my shirt.

Below, I have some things of interest and some course highlights.

Any Other Stuff:
HURT 100, 2005

OF INTEREST:

Jan 15 — 16 2005, 5th running
88 starters, 17 finishers — I was 6th with a 33 hr 4 min.
99% trail, 1% road.
5 x 20 mile loops, three aid stations on each loop. VERY long climbs out of each aid station.
Leadville = 43% finish rate, 15,600 ft of climb, 30 hour cutoff.
HURT = 19% finish rate, 23,750 ft of climb, 36 hour cutoff. Only two people were under 30 hours.
Not to take anything from Leadville (it has “cleaned my clock” a few times too), just to show some comparisons that got my attention.
Only two other 100 runs with a slower course record, Hardrock and Eagle (in Canada).
The top three runners for the first three laps did not finish. Eric Clifton included. They were all shooting for a sub 24 hour race. Winning time was 27:25
Mike Sweeny — prior winner and course record holder, one of the “top three” mentioned above. Mike fell on the second lap, dislocated his finger, finished that lap, went to the hospital all muddy and bloody from the fall, got his finger straightened, came back out to the course, ran lap three to finish the 100 km option. THAT’S TOUGH!
Two women finishers — Monica was shooting for a sub 30 hour race. Her winning time was 31:35
This 100 miler is unique in that they let you drop to the 100 km distance during the event with timing and scoring if you do so. Although, that is a nice option to have, it definitely decreases their finish rate in the 100 mile.
100 km = 52 finishers
I saw, and participated in, more falling during this event than ever before. I did not talk to anyone who did not fall.
Special thanks to Teresa, and Tom & Laura Kelecy. They were awesome support, crew and pacers. Great friends = Great times
The race organizers provide a rescue whistle to be carried during the race. Mine became useless due to a fall that exploded a gu pack which filled the whistle.
Due to the constant wet conditions, many people dropped due to what they called “trench foot.” That is a first for me!
I developed a burning rash on my legs and stomach. I was concerned that I had brushed against some sort of strange tropical plant, so at one of the aid stations I asked Teresa to get an opinion from one of the locals as to what it might be. She reported at the next aid station that it was simply “heat rash” and many people had it, whew! Another first!

THE COURSE:

I read the race reports, and did as much homework as I could to prepare myself on how tough this course would be; I still underestimated it. This thing was a Beast! Nevertheless, it was sooooo great!
I have never been to Hawaii before. Therefore, my first experience with the rain forest trails was when the sun came up about an hour into the race. I could not believe the lush plants and the unreal shapes they formed. The Banyan tree roots provided the most technical running I have ever experienced. In many places, there was just no good place to put my foot, just pick the best of the worst. The bamboo would knock against one another in a breeze that provided a gentle knocking sound; this was our natural wind chime.
The overcast clouds and some rain made for perfect temperatures for the whole run. However, the things that made for a great feeling above the ground made for an absolutely treacherous course beneath our feet. There was just enough moisture on everything to make an ice-like slipperiness on the roots, rocks, mud, and grass, combined with the steep and constant ascending and descending. Many places on the course have cliff-like edges next to the trail, but there was normally enough vegetation within reach to keep from falling very far. In my race description, I mention a spectacular fall a fellow took right behind me. This course is tough enough on a good year, but the race organizers and repeat runners named this year the toughest year yet.

THE RACE:

Start — 6:00 am Saturday, Jan 15, 2005. After a Hawaiian prayer, read in both Hawaiian and English, there was a blow on the conch shell, and we were off.

Lap one, 0-20 miles - About eight miles into the run when, as I was talking to the fellow behind me I heard a simultaneous “aaaagh” and “thump.” I stopped to help and he was just off the trail still in a vertical standing position but his head was about three feet lower than the trail. That would be the first of many falls I would see, but maybe the most spectacular. About halfway through this lap, I connected with my ultra-buddy Monica Scholz. We spent the rest of this lap and the next lap just cruising and chatting. There would be time later for racing each other. Although, I would find out that she is in great shape so I would not be much of a challenge for her today.

Lap two, 20-40 miles - Just enjoying the course, trying to run a smart race.

Lap three, 40-60 miles — Monica took off like crazy from the start/finish aid station, at 40 miles. I was still feeling good and I knew that if I let her go I would not catch her later. Therefore, I took off to try to get some distance ahead of her, it was my only chance. At about 47 miles, I picked up Tom as my first pacer. Up until this point I had witnessed quite a few falls but I was all puffed up with myself that I had not fallen, so my goal became that I would finish the race without falling. HA!!! It was dark now and before the night was over, I fell at least ten times! Although, I only took one real hard hit, thankfully most of the falls were in the mud. Toward the end of this lap, around 55 miles, Monica passed me back and I knew it would the end of our contest with each other for this race. That was OK with me though, I had one thing on my mind. Finish.

Lap four, 60-80 miles — Up until this time, the course seems to have a lot of runners on it. Due to the multiple laps, which also involve some out and backs, there were people around quite a bit. Well, approximately 62 miles is 100 km. In order to drop to the 100 km distance the requirement is that you speak to the race official at the start/finish aid station at 60 miles, he will try to talk you into finishing the 100 miles, but if you insist, he will give you an additional small loop to complete 100 km. This had the affect of cutting the number of starters in half; the trail was noticeably less populated. At the 72-mile aid station, pacers changed from a muddy and bruised Tom over to fresh and ready to go Teresa. We crossed the stream out of the Nu’uanu station and Teresa was able to experience the full-scale mud bath. Additionally, climbing up out of Nu’uanu is the steepest climb on the course, complete with permanent ropes strategically placed for safety against falling; a long way.

Lap five, 80-100 miles — It has just gotten light out but I am battling my normal demon of the 100 mile. Sleep deprivation. This is always my worst time during a race. Luckily, Teresa has been through this too many times to count and we were able to work through it. We kept plugging along and with the daylight, we were able to see the two out-of-this-world big Banyan trees on the course and a huge waterfall. Too Cool. At Nu’uanu station again, mile 92, Teresa turned her pacing over to Laura. Laura is battling a heel injury and was not going to pace me, but I think she heard about this wild and wooly course and just could not pass it up! So on toward the finish we went. The one place on the trail that I just could not believe every time I saw it was in the middle of each leg where we intersected on the out and backs. For about a half mile there are banyan tree roots that cover the whole trail which is very wide at this point, about 15 feet. The roots are all intertwined without enough space for a who le foot, and they vary about 2-6 inches high from the ground. Crazy. On the way down to the finish, some hikers were out (Sunday about 2:00 pm) and asked us what we were doing. Of course, they could not comprehend that we had started running yesterday at 6:00 am. I was all too comfortable just standing there yakking with the hikers, but Laura had other ideas, like finishing.

Finish — 3:04 pm Sunday, Jan 16 — Laura ran with me on in to the cheers of those at the finish. I had to run up and touch the sign that said, in both Hawaiian and English “We wouldn’t want to make it easy.” Well, they didn’t have to worry about that!
One belt buckle and a seashell & nut lei. I was one happy camper!!!


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Teresa Taylor reports:
Distance: 100 Mile
Goal: ******PACER, not runner!******** Pace Neal for a 20 mile loop
Results: Wow, what a course
Website: http://www.hurthawaii.com/

General Summary:
Neal’s race report has most of details, but I would like to add that in my years of trail running, never have I seen a trail as wicked as this one!

The HURT club and volunteers, including a HS cross country team, were WONDERFUL to runners and crew alike.

Things Done Right:
I usually pace Neal at the end of his 100 milers and know what to expect and how to handle it. The sleepiness he normally experiences was a minor factor this time, which was a surprise, as this course requires more time on trail that he has ever experienced. It is always amazing to me as both a racer and a pacer that 7 hours can go by so fast! Neal is always a joy to pace, and he was in good spirits knowing he was going to be finishing one of the hardest courses in the 100-mile circuit. We just took the climbs and descents as they came and ran whatever steps we could. I was impressed with the leg he had left for the up and down and we think being in shape for once, and the varied use of all muscle groups kept the range of motion intact throughout the race. At the end of my 20 miles, I turned the pacing over to Laura Kelecy, who although she had an injury, felt the pull of the course and wanted some of that trail experience we were all having. Going home without mud on her legs was not an option!

I was very pleased with my climbing. I know part of it was the abundance of Oxygen at sea level, but running more than once a week, plus the trips to Barr Camp and back these last months (both running and hiking with big backpacks) helped me build some strength I have been lacking. There is no substitute for training!

I was very proud at the finish, when Neal with his mud encrusted legs and big smile received his finishers Kukui nut lei and belt buckle. He went into this race with respect for and fear of the low finish rate and the difficulty of the course. He was one of the 19% who overcame it all and finished!

Things Done Wrong:
When your runner finishes and all is well, the things you thought might have been wrong really mean nothing!

Any Other Stuff:
Wicked! Continually up and down, and footing so bad you wonder how you will stay up — and I only did 20 miles! Not to mention the mud — a sticky tacky slippery mix of yuck that gets all over! Neal’s white IC shirt took an hour plus of scrubbing to get presentable, and the photos we took throught out the race show the shirt going from white to muddy mess with each of the loops!

I switched with Tom Kelecy so I could run the daylight to see the course. Bamboo clanking in the breeze, a green canopy filled with all sorts of birds, and plants that we know as houseplants with leaves as big as I am, were just some of the things we got to experience. Narrow Hog back mountain tops with sea breeze fog making it so slippery you made sure you held onto whatever vegetation you could find, and roots nearly up to you knees criss-crossing the trail in a tight weave you could not plant a foot securely or squarely between where just some of the more challenging trail hazards.

I was wonderful to have Tom and Laura there to help and to share trail and time with!

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Mississippi Marathon - Clinton, MS - January 15, 2005

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 2:55
Results: 3:08
Website: http://www.mstrackclub.com/

General Summary:
This, my 32nd marathon state and 64th marathon overall, was a good excuse to visit the capital of Mississippi and to see the Natchez Trace Parkway. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a scenic road, closed to commercial vehicles that makes it way some 100+ miles diagonnally across the state. January, with its bare trees, is probably not the most scenic time of year to visit, but it does have the advantage of being cool enough for a Coloradan.

Indeed, the temperature of 35 or so at race start was quite frigid.

Things Done Right:
Took a gamble. Given a chance to go for the win, don’t shrink from the task at hand.

Things Done Wrong:
Took a gamble. I wasn’t sure what condition I was in, so when a 48-yr-old guy moved out in front early on, I latched on and kept him in touch staying about 15 seconds back to nearly the halfway point, which we turned around 1:22. When we turned to head back we discovered the wind. It wasn’t overly strong, but under its persistence I wore down rapidly. Another 5 miles and my legs turned to lead, though even when my miles slowed to 8+, I kept running.

Any Other Stuff:
Scenic, mostly flat, out and back course on the Natchez Trace Parkway.

After the marathon I drove around Jackson and realized despite all our complaints about rapid uncontrolled growth--we have it good in Colorado Springs. Much of the city is trashed out tenement housing--ramshackly “BBQ” joints, liquor stores, garbage in the streets, pot holes, and trashy public housing tenements falling down in disrepair.

This afternoon I drove out to the historic city of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River, which I remembered visiting in the early 80’s while stationed at Keesler AFB. It has changed for the worse. They now have several large casinos which have apparently sucked the life blood from the town. I searched the city for an hour for a decent local non-chain restaurant before I finally found an excellent Italian place downtown. I did duck into one of the gaudy casinos and its buffet was packed. I retreated in horror though upon seeing the monstrously obese patrons lining up at the troughs.

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Arizona Rock N Roll - Phoenix, AZ - January 9, 2004

Connilee Walter reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: At least, go under 3:30, if I had a good day, go sub 3:20
Results: 3:22:11
Website: http://www.rnraz.com

General Summary:
Ran this race because I to get back in shape after Casey was born in August and the location was close to my parents town so we could time a visit accordingly. Admittedly, I was nervous about completing this marathon, since I had not completed a marathon in nearly two years, and had been off running for approximately a year prior to starting a marathon training plan.

Things Done Right:
Tried out the Pete Pfitzinger 55 miles week or less for 12 weeks marathon plan. Loved it. Ran a couple of tune up races to assess my fitness level and set goals accordingly. Brought my own gels but relied entirely on the race staff for water and Gatorade.

Ran indoors on the treadmill as much as possible the last two to three weeks prior to the marathon to help acclimate myself to the warmer conditions I expected in Arizona.

As I thought about pacing myself to the finish, I wanted to feel fresh at the half marathon point (just like the goal in the Peak is to feel relatively fresh at Barr Camp). I passed the half marathon in 1:41 and change and felt good. I picked it up a bit from mile 13 to 20, and then another notch from 20 to 26. Finished strong.

Also, a new twist for me — Jonathan and Lindsay Cavner were kind enough to pace me the last two miles of the marathon. I was feeling strong at this point, and he was able to give me an extra push. My guess is that I was able to push 20-30 seconds per mile faster due to the help of fresh humans! :) The emotional and physical support was a real boost!

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe, I could have broken 3:20 if I had been more ambitious with my pacing. But it might have backfired too.

Any Other Stuff:
This was the second year for AZRNR. The first year reportedly had several glitches including a late start and lost shuttle buses. This year, however, Elite Racing seemed to have straightened out the glitches with a super-smooth race start and plenty of water at all aid stations. This second year also brought a ‘flatter’ course (but surprisingly, slower times by the elite athletes). The temps were warm but not unbearable at about 40 degrees for the race start and close to 70 at the finish.

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6th Annual Texas Marathon - Kingwood, TX (NE of Houston) - January 1, 2005

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 5:00
Results: 5:28:47
Website: http://www.50statesmarathonclub.com/texas2005.html

General Summary:
4-loop trail run through pine forests and along lake NE of Houston. Well-organized and definitely caters to all of the runners.

Things Done Right:
Maintained 10-minute pace for first 18 miles.

Things Done Wrong:
Shins gave out @ mile 18. Became difficult to push off with either foot, Could not even walk fast. Warm weather ... mid-70’s and humid!

Any Other Stuff:
Course was fairly flat. Trails were mainly asphalt and concrete.

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Honolulu Marathon - Honolulu, HI - December 13, 04

Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Finish
Results: finished
Website: http://honolulumarathon.com

General Summary:
Although I have been VERY bad about submitting race reports when I saw Craig Hess’ report I thought I might add my 2 cents. I agree with everything he said about the course, the expense, etc. It doesn’t offer much in the way of “personality” that’s for sure. It was my first road marathon and now I know why...it’s just not the same.

Things Done Right:
Diet, shoes, arriving early enough to settle down before the race, etc.

Things Done Wrong:
training plan. Shouldn’t train for Honolulu Marathon on the trails of Tantalus. Grabbed the Amino Value cup without realizing how nasty it tastes.

Any Other Stuff:
Japan Airlines books three flights a day for a week and a half prior to the marathon just for marathon runners. I guess it’s one of the few marathons with no cut off times so if it takes you 12-14 hours so be it (and it did take that long for some runners). Because of this, you can go home successful in completing your marathon and not lose face with family and friends. The amino stuff Craig talked about is Amino Value. It is a thick, very salty, mango/orange flavored drink and when served warm (as it was) sits like a salt lick in your stomach. This gave me new meaning to the word nausea. Oh well, I can now say I’ve done the Honolulu Marathon, yippee, back to the trail. I’ll be more vigilant sending “R” reports from the Hawaii Ultra Running Team runs(HURT, get it? :-) ).

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15th Annual Sunmart Texas Trail 50 Miler - Huntsville, Texas - December 11, 2004

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 50 Miles
Goal: Under 12:00
Results: 9:28:54 (40 miles)
Website: http://www.sunmart.net/Race/Default.aspx

General Summary:
4 12.5 mile loops through thick pine forests, dirt trails with plenty of rock and root outcroppings.

Things Done Right:
Maintained planned pace and comfortably made all three cut-offs.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t pack flashlight or headlamp. Shied away from completing final loop because of darkness, muscle stiffness and frequent cough.

Any Other Stuff:
While disappointed by DNF, I established distance and time benchmarks that will helpful in future ultras.

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California International Marathon - Sacramento, California - December 5, 2004

Gary Hellenga reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Sub 3:20
Results: 3:27
Website: http://www.runcim.org

General Summary:
Ran comfortably under planned 3:20 pace until 20 miles, then knee problem and fuel issues caused big slowdown at end.

Things Done Right:
Ran consistently at planned pace, with a pace group.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t get a season-long knee injury dealt with until after the race. Depended on race organizers to provide energy gel at advertised points on course. There was no gel at mile 13 (unless I somehow missed it), and there were no other gel points until mile 19, so I kinda ran low on fuel.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice course; perfect weather (mid 30’s at start; mid 40’s at finish). Start line wasn’t crowded, even with 5000 runners. First event where I’ve seen a racer actually holding a cell phone conversation during the race!

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OTHTC 50km - Ridgcrest, CA - December 5, 2004

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 km
Goal: break 6 hours
Results: 5:53:14
Website: http://othtc.com

General Summary:
The OTHTC (Over The Hill Track Club) 50km is run primarily on rolling trails in the high desert, about 2 hours outside of Death Valley.

Things Done Right:
Finished under 6 hours despite an IT band injury

Things Done Wrong:
Pushed when my IT band really hurt. It still hurts. Could have done a lot better if it weren’t for this injury.

Any Other Stuff:


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Memphis St. Judes Marathon - Memphis TN - December 4, 2004

Brenda & Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: To Finish
Results: Finished !!

General Summary:
This race was run around downtown Memphis to benefit St. Judes children’s hospital. The weather was perfect-cool and sunny.

Things Done Right:
Almost everything. Ate lots of Gu during the race and also drank every mile.

Things Done Wrong:
More road miles would have helped.

Any Other Stuff:
We enjoyed the scenery and sights of Memphis. Saw Elvis and listened to some terrific music on Beale St., “home of the blues.” Had a lot of fun running the race together.

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Rock Canyon Half Marathon - Pueblo, CO - December 4, 2004

Al Garcia reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 1:45
Results: 1:50:49
Website: http://www.socorunners.org

General Summary:
Good course with great weather. Race was about the same course from last year (I think?) Well marked and marshalled. I really like the sweatshirt!

Things Done Right:
Had enough rest going into this race. Made it to the location with enough time to get organized. Definitely had a good meal the night before which seemed to help.

Things Done Wrong:
Was a little over dressed. Didn’t move thru the aid stations well enough. Didn’t move out soon enough to hit my goal time- I felt good and could of pushed it a bit harder.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a small race compared to a lot of others. This seems to make it a low key kind of affair. Definitely a race to test how things are going. I had a good time!

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Connilee Walter reports:
Distance: 13.1 Miles
Goal: Break 1:40 at the very least, go sub-1:35 at the most
Results: 1:35:58
Website: http://www.socorunners.org

General Summary:
Three months postpartum, still getting back in shape. I’ve run two 5k’s, but this was my first race of longer distance. Went out knowing that I should be able to break 1:40 fairly easily, but hoping for better. Also, wanted to go out steady and finish strong. I ran mostly by my HRM and ended up coming close to my dream goal for this race (breaking 1:35), feeling very strong, and passing many folks in the last 2 miles.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
This was my first time running this course. As is characteristic of the Southern Colorado Roadrunners, it was a well-organized, friendly event. The course started in City Park on pavement, but quickly came down by the river where it was mostly a trail/gravel road out and back. The weather was excellent for December, and I was told that they usually do have great weather for this race. There were several IC’ers there who had great races!

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Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 1hour 50 minutes
Results: 1hour 52 minutes 36 seconds
Website: http://www.socorunners.org

General Summary:
Start and finish in Pueblo city park. Run along the Arkansas River Trail. Out and back course on dirt and asphhalt trails with some concrete. Mostly flat course with one short steep hill.

Things Done Right:
Got plenty of rest before the race and was well hydrated. Started out a little fast but monitored my pace and fell into one that I was able to maintain for the duration of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
A little over dressed and didn’t eat my usual pre race dinner the night before.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice course and a fun race but too much concrete, my legs are feeling the effect.

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John Cassidy reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: 1:59:59
Results: 1:52.31
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/

General Summary:
Mostly flat course. Run around the zoo twice, then down to the Arkansas River bottom. Follow the river to Pueblo Dam then back to the zoo. Hydro street type hill at 12.75 miles while running out of the river bottoms.

Things Done Right:
Arrived in time. No walking sessions during the race. Listened to music instead of by breathing. Stayed behind Diane four the first 4 miles. Passing her to soon has meant me dying on the 2nd half of any race.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t practice eating a gel while stressed ie. during a run. I should have car pooled it to Pueblo. I still have no kick at the end of a race.

Any Other Stuff:
Ran with Incline club members who were faster than me last year. I’m slowing improving.

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Farenheit be Darned Turkey Trot - Fairbanks, Alaska - Nov 29, 2004

Teresa & Neal Taylor reports:
Distance: 5 km (or 6 km, not sure!) predict race
Goal: to not freeze!
Results: Froze only a few parts...

General Summary:
It was a predict race. Easier running with no mountains and 500 ft elevation! Got off the plane at 1 am and ran at 10 am (that is when the sun came up and we had enough light) The ‘farenheit be darned’ runners run year round, as a sub-group of the North Country Running Club. Tough group, running in temps that make a snowman shiver! Actually, there are no snowmen as the snow is too dry, but the ice is great for the sculptors! The race was fun, we met some great folks and shared that wonderful friendship runners have the world around.

Things Done Right:
Dressed warm.

Things Done Wrong:
Planned on a prompt start as it was pretty chilly, but life is more relaxed in Alaska. (Race started at 11!)

Any Other Stuff:
One hill, freezing fog.

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Run To The Far Side - San Francisco - Nov 28, 2004

Run To The Far Side - San Francisco - Nov 28, 2004
Dave Sorenson reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: Finish with my daughters
Results: Finished with my daughters

General Summary:
This was a fun and enjoyable race. The course was in Golden Gate Park and some adjoining streets. My daughters and I cruised along with about 10,000 other runners, so there was no chance of getting lonely. There were also some great costumes to keep us entertained.

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Topanga Turkey Trot - Topanga State Park, near L.A., CA - November 27, 2004

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 15km trails with 1,800’ of climbing
Goal: Didn’t know the course or competition. Have a good time and a good workout
Results: 1st overall, 1:11:43
Website: http://www.trailrace.com

General Summary:
Very casual approach to the race. Didn’t preview the course, other than the first/last 1/2 mi. Did very little warm-up.

The leader (or so I thought) was quickly off the front and lost in the fog. I separated myself from the rest of the pack and was quickly out of sight too. I picked up the effort after ~10 minutes, but slowed down when I got confused on a couple of sections and junctions. The course was generally well marked, including mile markers, but there were a couple of incorrect signs (2 other distances also racing that day) which confused me, and a junction that I almost missed because they didn’t have a marshal. I picked up the effort again once I was sure I was on the right trail, but the “lead” runner was too far ahead. I only saw the next runner once, on an out-and-back section. I had a 1:15 lead on him then, and put another 1:40 on him over the final 2.5mi, mostly downhill.

I didn’t know that I was leading on the course. I didn’t find out that I had won until they printed the results, about an hour later. Apparently the “leader” wasn’t entered in the race. They didn’t do awards — it was chilly, so people left after the raffle. So, it was a very underwhelming victory.

Things Done Right:
Ran my own race. Didn’t go out too hard too early. Pushed hard once I knew where I was. Finished very strongly.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t warm up enough. I might have been able to go out harder and stay with the unofficial leader. Since it was just a fun run for me, it didn’t matter that much. I didn’t push the 2nd uphill enough because I thought it would be longer.

Any Other Stuff:
Great running area. About 3.5mi on a narrow, single-track, that required ducking low canopies without breaking stride. The rest on fire roads. I used to live in the area and used to know the trails, but it’s been over 10 years.

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Aluminum Man Biathlon - Polo Beach, Maui - November 14, 2004

Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 3/4 swim & 5 mile run
Goal: not drown
Results: Didn’t drown!
Website: http://www.virr.com or http://www.tropicallight.com/races.html for pictures

General Summary:
Free biathlon series put on by a couple in the Valley Isle Road Runners. They have 7 throughout the year. They are just for fun, very casual, social events.

Things Done Right:
Showed up with a good attitude and a healthy respect for the ocean.

Things Done Wrong:
Had never done an open-water swim before. Realized that is an area I have lots of opportunity to improve!

Any Other Stuff:
The event started out with a blessing (like most all events here on Hawaii). We swam 3 laps around buoys set up off the beach. Participants could use fins, masks & snorkels if they aren’t comfortable swimmers, or they didn’t have to do the whole swim, they could tag team (1 person swim, 1 person run). The idea is just to get people out & being active. I was almost the last one out of the water, but was able to make up time on the run. Everyone donated a door prize for a drawing after the race. Now I have an idea what transitions are like. A triathlon is not out of the question.

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Harbor to Harbor 15K - Maui, Hawaii - November 7, 2004

Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 15K (9.3 miles)
Goal: Under 1 hr 15 min
Results: 1:06:27 — 1st female
Website: http://virr.com

General Summary:
Flat 15K road race along the serene West Maui mountains from the Kahului Harbor to the Maalaea Harbor. The race almost didn’t happen because not enough volunteers, but at the last minute, the usual Valley Isle Road Runner folks stepped up to take it on and the race went off without a hitch. Beer & animal crackers were my post-race fuel! Great awards; I guess someone forgot to order plaques so gift/food baskets and lei were given instead. I liked that much better!

Things Done Right:
Went into the race well rested; doing lots of cross training; didn’t put too much pressure on myself, but still had the usual pre-race anxiety. Used the race to meet more of the local running community.

Things Done Wrong:
Not serious about the speed work, only did one 10 mile run. Our usual routine is running not-quite-six miles.

Any Other Stuff:
This was my first 15K so I can say I PR’d no matter what time I ran! The Valley Isle Road Runners always put on good events, lots of aloha spirit. The funnest part for me was having a bicycle escort (named Lance no less!!) — about half way through the race, I noticed this bicyclist sitting on my shoulder. I thought he just wanted to get by me so I kept moving over on the shoulder of the road, but he stayed right there. Then he started telling me where the next aid station was, but then he said, “Oops, I guess it’s a little farther than I thought.” That was cute. I finally figured he was escorting the 1st female! I felt like a celebrity. I’d never had that treatment before. We had lots of fun socializing with the other runners and are finding that familiar “family” feeling in our local running club.

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