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2006 Incline Club Race Reports

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View 2007 race reports

Pikes Peak Double - Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO - August 19, 2006 - 4 reports
Pikes Peak Marathon - Manitou Springs, CO - August 20, 2006 - 12 reports
Ski Haus Continental Divide Trail Run - Steamboat Springs - August 20, 2006
Pikes Peak Ascent - Manitou Springs, CO - August 19, 2006 - 21 reports
Leadville Trail 100 - Leadville, CO - August 19, 2006 - 3 reports
Run Through the Pines - Lake Gregory, CA - August 12, 2006
Squaw Valley Mountain Run - Squaw Valley, CA - August 5, 2006
Headwaters Relay - Three Forks to Centennial Valley, Montana - July 28-30, 2006
Vail Half Marathon - Vail, CO - July 23, 2006
Wharf to Wharf - Sanata Cruz/Captola, CA - July 23, 2006
Barr Mountain Trail Race - Manitou Springs, CO - July 16, 2006 - 12 reports
High Mountain Institute 50K - Leadville, CO - July 16, 2006 - 3 reports
Garnet Mountain Challenge - Near Big Sky, Montana - July 15, 2006
HardRock Hundred - Silverton CO - July 14 - 16, 2006
Summer Roundup Trail Run 12K - Colorado Springs, CO - July 9, 2006 - 6 reports
Trophy Selection Race - Vail - July 9, 2006
Mt. Marathon Race - Seward, AK - July 4, 2006
Red, White & Blue 5K race - Villa Park, CA - July 1, 2006
Spring Creek Memorial - Steamboat Springs - July 1, 2006
Leadville Trail Marathon - Leadville, CO - July 1, 2006 - 6 reports
Ironman Couer d’Alene - Coeur d’Alene, ID - June 26, 2006
Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run - Squaw Valley to Auburn, CA - June 24-25, 2006
Tour du Luc - Bucksport, Maine - June 24, 2006
5K Scholastic Challenge - Springfield, Illinois - June 24, 2006
Estes Park Marathon - Estes Park, CO - June 18, 2006 - 2 reports
San Juan Solstice 50 - Lake City, CO - June 17, 2006 - 6 reports
Mt Evans Ascent - Mt Evans highway, Colorado - June 17, 2006 - 5 reports
Bighorn 50 miler - Dayton Wyoming - June 17, 2006
Mt. Washington Road Race - New Hampshire - June 17, 2006 - 2 reports
Vail 10k at 8000 ft - Vail, CO - June 11, 2006
Garden of the Gods 10 Mile - Colorado Springs, CO - June 11, 2006 16 reports
10k Run For the Heart - Newport News, VA - June 10, 2006
North Olympic Discovery Marathon - Port Angeles, WA - June 10, 2006
4th Annual Casper Marathon - Casper, Wyoming - June 4, 2006
Steamboat Springs Half Marathon - Steamboat Springs, Colorado - June 4, 2006
Steamboat Springs Marathon - Steamboat Springs, Colorado - June 4, 2006 - 2 reports
Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run - Orem, Utah - June 3, 2006
Balarat Trail Run - Jamestown - June 3, 2006
Rocky Mountain Double Marathon - Medicine Bow National Forest - May 28, 2006
NipMuck Trail Marathon - Connecticut - May 28, 2006
Georgetown Mining Days Burro Race - Georgetown - May 27, 2006
1st Annual Post-News Colorado Colfax Marathon - Denver - May 21, 2006
Journeys Marathon - Eagle River, Wisconsin - May 13, 2006 - 2 reports
Jemez 50km - Los Alamos, New Mexico - May 13, 2006
Bloomsday 12K - Spokane, WA - May 7, 2006
The Flying Pig Marathon - Cincinatti, Ohio - May 7, 2006
Colorado Marathon - Fort Collins, CO - May, 7 2006 - 2 reports
Collegiate Peaks Trail Run — 50 Miles - Buena Vista, Colorado - May 6, 2006 - 5 reports
Collegiate Peaks Trail Run — 25 Miles - Buena Vista, Colorado - May 6, 2006 - 6 reports
Skyline Ridge Trail Run - Palo Alto, CA - April 29, 2006
Greenland 50k - Greenland Open Space - April 29, 2006
Greenland 25k Trail race - Greenland, CO - April 29, 2006 - 5 reports
Brickyard 8 Miler - Martinez, CA - April 23, 2006
Boston Marathon - Boston, MA - April 17,2006 - 5 reports
Umstead 100 mile endurance run - Raliegh NC - April 8-9, 2006
Platte River Trail Half Marathon - Littleton to Denver - April 2, 2006
29th Annual Capitol 10K - Austin, Texas - April 2, 2006
Moab Marathon - Moab, Utah - April 1, 2006
Knoxville Marathon - Knoxville TN - March 26, 2006
The Grasslands Run - LBJ Natl Grasslands, Decatur Texas - March 25, 2006
Catalina Marathon - Catalina Island, CA - March 18, 2006
Chambersburg 1/2 Marathon - Chambersburg, PA - March 18, 2006
Turret Marathon - Salida, Colorado - March 18, 2006
A Run Through Time 1/2 Marathon - Salida, CO - March 18, 2006
A Run Through Time Marathon - Salida, CO - March 18, 2006 - 3 reports
Lake Hodges 50km - Lake Hodges, CA - March 11, 2006
Jeremy Wright North American Snowshoe Championships - Beaver Creek Colorado - March 5, 2006
Old Pueblo 50 mile - Soniota AZ - March 4, 2006
Snowman Stampede - Cherry Creek State Park - February 25, 2006
Coyote4Play - Santa Monica Mountains, Oxnard, California - February 23-26, 2006
George Washington’s Birthday Marathon - Greenbelt, MD - February 19, 2006
Orange Curtain 100km/50km - Cerritos Park, CA - February 18, 2006
Screamin Snowman 10k snowshoe - Eldora, CO - February 12, 2006
New World Championship Snowshoe Races - Luck, Wisconsin - February 11, 2006
Buffalo Run II - Parkville, MO - February 5, 2006 - 2 reports
Iowa State Snowshoe Championships - Hartman Preserve — Cedar Falls, Iowa - February 4, 2006
Rocky Raccoon 100 Mile - Huntsville State Park, TX — N. of Houston - February 4, 2006 - 3 reports
Pemberton 50K - Fountain Hills, AZ - February 4, 2006
Chilly Hilly - Near Martinsville, IN - January 21-21, 2006
34th Annual Houston-Chevron Marathon - Houston, Texas - January 15, 2006
PF Chiangs Rock & Roll Arizona Marathon - Phoenix, AZ - January 15, 2006 - 3 reports
Calico 50km and 30km - Calico Ghost Town CA - January 15, 2006
Avalon 50 mile run - Catalina Island, CA - January 14, 2006
Fat Ass 50k - Harrisburg, PA - January 1, 2006
Rescue Run - Palmer Park - January 1, 2006 - 18 reports
Tucson Marathon - Tucson, AZ - December 4, 2005
High Desert Ultra 50km - Ridgecrest, CA - December 4, 2005
Rock Canyon Half Marathon - Pueblo, CO - December 3, 2005
Santa Barbara 9 Trails - Santa Barbara, CA - November 26, 2005

View 2005 race reports


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Pikes Peak Double - Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO - August 19, 2006

Timothy Edwards reports:
Distance: 13.3 + 26.2
Goal: 4H day one, 4:30 up / 7H for marathon finish
Results: got really close considering my injury
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I was injured at work this year-right ankle- and could not run much. I finally “heeled” about a week before the race, so my training consisted of ‘intelligent cramming’. (And my goal was not aggressive.)
I did the Ascent in 4:05 (goal was 4H), hit my day 2 Ascent goal (4:30) but missed my 7hr Marathon finishline goal by hitting 7h:11m

Things Done Right:
Lots of hydration and nutrition intake

Things Done Wrong:
Inadequate training due to injury

Calculator:
Calculator works fine when I use consistent effort

Any Other Stuff:
It was my 8th consecutive Pikes Peak Double and my 9th consecutive PPAscent. It was also my last PPDouble in my Forties — I turn 50 in July.

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Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: further than most, but others are longer
Goal: Goal was finish both days, sub 3:30 Saturday, sub 6:00 Sunday, and improve on double time.
Results: 3:23:00 ascent; 5:52:11 round trip: Wow best ascent in 5 years, best round time in 8 years, best dou
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Nasty case of plantar fasciitis (PF) beginning of May cost me about 6 weeks of quality training. Once I could run consistently again (mid June) I focused on running high. I even did the minute hard easy at 12,000+ feet a few times

Side note: I really worked at getting rid of PF, good results. In talking to other runners found lots of us are dealing with it. Would be happy to share my experiences. There are a number of good web sites, here is just one of them:
www.drpribut.com/sports/heelhtm.htm.

Besides training high I focused on mental preparation (PMA makes a difference), I also worked on even effort, working hard but avoiding going into the red zone. Due to PF my base was not what I wanted, did not do anything longer than an ascent in training and as a precaution limited downhill running.

I guess approach worked, ascent really could not have gone any better, pretty much hit my “ideal — best case” splits (see calculator comments). I felt good, mentally was really buzzed. I really drew on the energy from the local running community. We are very lucky to have all the support and interaction that occurs in Pikes Peak Country.

After ascent focused on getting ready for Sunday — reload and rest. Felt pretty good at start Sunday, mentally was still riding high. Early in the race I set another goal: beat Matt to A Frame, and I did it with about 1 ½ minute to spare. Yes, Matt did not pass me going back down until just after I passed A Frame on way up.
At A Frame I was four minutes behind Saturday (my splits were about 1 minute slower per segment (W’s, No Name, BC, A Frame)). Then the lack of base started to be a factor — I did not boink, but I started thinking about the downhill, fretting about my foot, feeling satisfied (after all just met my goal of the day :-)), was thinking about being tired and depleted. I pretty much power walked the top three miles (had run much of it Saturday). I lost 2 minutes to Saturday on miles 3 & 2 and the last mile was FIVE minutes slower than Saturday (needed food, yielding right of way to downhill runners, and saving some energy for downhill). Ascent time was 13 minutes slower than Saturday. Decent time of 2:16 kind of weak but I have been slower. PF never was an issue!! Given lack of base, long runs and downhill training RT went as good as I could have expected.

Things Done Right:
Keys to success this year were:
*Getting high often
*Even effort, avoiding red zone
*PMA

Things Done Wrong:
Keys to improvement for next year
*Better base
*A few long runs 5-6 hour range
*Quality downhill training
*Reload for double: I could feel energy level wane after about 3 hours Sunday, body was depleted, I had to conserve and spread out reserves. Was craving food — maybe should have taken more at aid stations. I really think I did all I could think of to reload after Ascent (fluids, carbs, rest) but need to improve , open to suggestions.

Calculator:
For ascent felt if all went perfect I could run a 3:22, missed by exactly 1 minute, although I could swear the clock said 3:22:58 when I finished ;-). I was 1 minute ahead of pace at Barr Camp, lost 3 minutes for A Frame segment. One minute ahead of pace chart for top 3 miles for net of off one minute. Not sure why I was off pace for A Frame segment, felt ok -something to work on I guess.

Any Other Stuff:
Just one hill but it is a very long one!

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Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: half and full marathon
Goal: 2:50 ascent; finish marathon
Results: 3:03 ascent; 4:56 marathon
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Ascent: Ran pretty good to A-Frame (2:06), but struggled to the finish, losing about 2 minutes a mile off my training times on the last three. I’m blaming it on the low pressure system.

Marathon: Slower to the top (3:11). Stayed with Ed Baxter until shortly before Bottomless Pit sign, then watched him pull away. Started off wobbly on the downhill portion. As about five younger runners passed me with ease I thought “Old, tired legs. Sigh.” Got down the cirque aid station and stopped. Ate handful of grapes, some chex mix, and felt revived. The new magic fuel? Started running again and got into great rythm. Passed ALL the young runners who had passed me on the previous mile and set my sights on more victims. “Crazy Legs” hunted down about 20 more on the way to the finish line. I got passed by no one. Running sub-5 was in doubt until I reached “4 miles to go” however. A glance at my watch showed 4:28. My thought was “I think I can run eight minute miles to the finish!” I proceeded to run seven minute miles and finished below 5 hours with more than a three minute cushion.

Things Done Right:
Trained a lot on the mountain. Ran to the top about 6 times.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train hard enough on the mountain. Need to run to the top 12-15 times next year.

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Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 13.2 miles and 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:20 and 5:30
Results: 3:22 and 5:30
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
The weather turned out to be perfect, even after a heavy rain forecast. I felt good after the first day and was only 5 minutes slower to the top on day two.

Things Done Right:
I trained properly and stayed hydrated and ate proper nutrition for both races.

Things Done Wrong:
I could have walked more on day one and probably saved time and energy

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Pikes Peak Marathon - Manitou Springs, CO - August 20, 2006<

Andy Dillon reports:
Distance: 26 miles
Goal: No goal this year
Results: 6 hours 44mins
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I have done the Ascent 7 years running and decided to try the marathon for a change. It’s a different experience for sure! First of all, it’s far less crowded, and you can run your own pace through the W’s. However, the last mile up is tough as you are constantly stopping to give way to the downhillers.

On the way down it was great how everybody got out of the way. Excellent race etiquette and a great atmosphere. I was surprised how tough the downhill was though — it really beats you up!

My race went well until above the treeline, but I bonked in the last couple of miles. On the way down I felt totally exhausted until Barr Camp, but then I felt much better and picked up the pace. The Gatorade at the aid stations went down well on the way down — I think that contributed to my late recovery! Oxygen might have something to do with it also :-)

Things Done Right:
Ran a good pace until A-Frame on the way up, so I gave myself a shot at a good time, however it wasn’t my day. Managed not to fall on the way down, which was an unexpected bonus!

Things Done Wrong:
Too many nights of interrupted sleep (baby Patrick was born in June). That makes it hard to get out and train. Still, he’s worth it :-)

It’s no secret — more running on the mountain makes you a better runner in these races and I didn’t do enough this year.

Need a fuel strategy for this race — Gu and water work great for me on the way up but I couldn’t take any more Gu on the way down. I decided Gatorade at the aid stations was the way to go and it worked for me, however I should have figured this out beforehand then I wouldn’t have passed the first couple of stations on the way down and taken just water!

Calculator:
A great tool.

Any Other Stuff:
A great race — and it was inspiring to see Matt flying down the mountain ahead of all those international mountain runner types!

Congratulations to all the IC’ers who took part in, volunteered or supported these races this weekend — you were awesome!

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Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Make cut off’s
Results: Didn’t make cut off at the top
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Only made it to the top. Didn’t make cut off at the top.

Things Done Right:
Pacing, hydration

Things Done Wrong:
Training. Will train harder next year. No excuses.

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Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi
Goal: Sub 6
Results: 5:45
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Great weather! Great people! Great support! Had fun talking to other runners on the mtn, like Doug Laufer, Steve Abeyta, Jim Cannon, etc. Looking forward to next year.

Things Done Right:
Had to stop at Barr Camp on the way down the mountain because nature called. Felt great for the last 7 miles back down the mountain and passed a lot of runners

Things Done Wrong:
Ate dinner too late the night before (at a wedding... didn’t eat ‘til around 9PM). The meal didn’t feel the need to exit until I was up above A-Frame. This slowed me down tremendously on the ascent portion, and I didn’t get a chance to solve the problem until Barr Camp on the return trip. Oh well. S**T happens!

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Michael Hartley reports:
Distance: 26 and some
Goal: Finish
Results: Finish/ Six and a half
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Great day! Excited at top to be within 5 minutes of my Saturday Ascent.

Things Done Right:
Did not start to fast. Took advantage of straights and down slopes. Re-energized when viewing Matt cranking downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
I am happy with the finish.

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Daniel Solinski reports:
Distance: 26.21 miles
Goal: 4:49:59-5:30:00
Results: 5:31:00
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Started out much as I have in my training runs as far as pace. Felt great until around 1 mile above Barr Camp and then started to fade. Legs cramped a bit above treeline. Kept fighting hard until the summit. Turned around and felt recovered by about A-Frame and had a strong finish.

Things Done Right:
Had a PR of 3:28+ on the Ascent portion, a PR of 2:02+ on the descent and an overall PR of 5:31 for the marathon. Ran the Ascent in 2005 in 5:14, so a HUGE improvement for me this year. Thanks Incline Club!! I am very indebted to all my new running friends for their examples of dedication/effort and for all of their kind words of encouragement throughout the season. You have all helped me get to the next level.

Things Done Wrong:
Might have reduced my long runs a little early and cut short my attempts from Memorial to A-Frame and beyond.

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Alana Podratz reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 7 hours 30 minutes
Results: 9 hours 20 minutes
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Toughest race mentally I have ever ran. The mountain had me on race day.

Things Done Right:
Finishing under 10 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
I couldn’t get my head right. I was a bundle of nerves the whole week before and at the start. So much so that I made myself sick. I should have just gone out and done it, like any other day (with 800 of my closest friends on Barr Trail)!

Calculator:

Any Other Stuff:
Thank You to all the Race Volunteers and The El Paso County Search and Rescue!

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Tom McKernan reports:
Distance: 26 miles
Goal: 9 hours
Results: 9 hours, 11 minutes
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Not too bad, I was 21 minutes faster this year, two minutes off my PR Ascent time, but a few minutes slower on the descent from last year.

Things Done Right:
I trained with a heart monitor all year and keeping it near 85-90% max on the Sunday runs. Perhaps that was a little too high. During the race, I kept a steady effort, at about 90% max heart rate, and managed to do the top relatively pain free but slow.

Things Done Wrong:
I probably needed to drink just a tad more and I probably didn’t eat enough during the race, limiting myself to the snacks at the aid station and a couple packets of GU.

Calculator:
Despite about doing 5-6 runs above 12000 ft, Elk Park x 2, PP 3-2 x 3, and climbing Mt Antero, I still didn’t make the summit IAW the calculator. I was 2:40 to Barr Camp, 3:55 to A-Frame, and 5:54 to the Summit. Adding 30 minutes to your Barr Camp time still seems like a good rule of thumb. What does a lot of high altitude training mean? That should be explained better on the website.

Any Other Stuff:
Many thanks to the volunteers!

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.21 miles
Goal: finish; PR; sub 7:00
Results: all of the above; 6:59:35
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Much anticipated attempt at completing the DOUBLE after aborting the attempt after reaching the summit on Sunday last year!

Things Done Right:
Practiced what I’d learned from the previous day, and last year, and went out at a more conservative pace; focused on an even effort! Wore mittens; avoided the numbing pain in my fingers that I had experienced the past 2 attempts!

Things Done Wrong:
Let other runners dictate my pace the first couple of miles on the descent; turned ankle more than 11 miles from finish.

Calculator:
Very effective this time; amazing how important it is to follow the prescription on the first couple of check points!

Any Other Stuff:
Very satisfying results; achieved my DOUBLE and PR’d in the marathon in the process! Plan do train harder next year and spend time above Barr Camp.

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: to aid
Results: i just helped
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I was hoping...just cuz..to get a V for helping out on Sunday...???

Things Done Right:
Thank you

Things Done Wrong:
Sooo much

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Robert L Crawford reports:
Distance: 26.21
Goal: 6:30.00
Results: 6:53:53
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
The Weather was very good this year, Great Volunteers.
Looking to next year.

Things Done Right:
Training went well, Ran the Ascent ok, was Happy with that part.

Things Done Wrong:
Didnt run the downhill fast enough, need to run more the downhill faster.

Calculator:
Have to look at this for next year.

Any Other Stuff:
Fell at the eighteen mile mark, nothing hurt, but ran with much more caution after that.

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Angela Cassidy reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 8 hours
Results: 9:19 Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
At first, I swore “Never Again.” Now, it’s “I gotta do better than a barely finish!” I had a sub 5 ascent pace going up to A Frame (which is great in my book!) and then crashed (see #1 of things gone wrong). Arrived at summit 6 min after my 2005 hail+ice filled Ascent. I was pretty discouraged. At summit, I got an eval by the nurse for a shin spint issue, ate my peach, barfed my peach, and was told I was good for going down. The descent, I was pretty happy for the first 2 miles. After that, well, it got rough again. On the rare uphills during the descent, I was just plain happy just to take a break on the excruciating toe pounding.

Things Done Right:
-Didn’t top off my Camelbak at Barr Camp and got into a hydration deficit that affected me above A Frame. Super dummy move.
-Should have used a Camelbak that is both light AND has a belly belt.
-I thought my Salomon GCS Comp trail shoes were adequately broken in. The old pair (same model) did great on Mt. Whitney. The terrible blisters and unending pain from A-Frame down tell me otherwise.
-Had a hard time staying focused on the technical portions of the downhill,so I spent a lot of time in the dirt.
-If you meet me, ask about the one snag that I’m not quite ready to write about. I should be ready to talk about it by then.

Things Done Wrong:
-Didn’t top off my Camelbak at Barr Camp and got into a hydration deficit that affected me above A Frame. Super dummy move.
-Should have used a Camelbak that is both light AND has a belly belt.
-I thought my Salomon GCS Comp trail shoes were adequately broken in. The old pair (same model) did great on Mt. Whitney. The terrible blisters and unending pain from A-Frame down tell me otherwise.
-Had a hard time staying focused on the technical portions of the downhill,so I spent a lot of time in the dirt.
-If you meet me, ask about the one snag that I’m not quite ready to write about. I should be ready to talk about it by then.

Calculator:
A friend suggested to tape it to the inside of my bib. Great idea! It was spot-on until I hit the wall after A Frame.

Any Other Stuff:
Gotta do this one again, if only to be right with myself. Thank you to the volunteers for your unending cheering and support. That encouragement is just so needed when things are getting tough. Huge thanks to my brother, John, who blew his race to stay with me the whole way. Without him, I don’t know if I would have even finished. I found I really like Mike N Ike.

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David Hatfield reports:
Distance: 26.3
Goal: 6:55
Results: 7:28 or so Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Began cramping by mile 3 due to kidney stones. You can imagine how it went;)

Things Done Right:
I didn’t fall. I shared my fuel. I didn’t quit.

Things Done Wrong:
Honestly pretty proud of my performance if I ignore the time. I don’t think I ran a tougher race or performed with as much pain since high school.

Any Other Stuff:
This is the best course I have ever run. Unbelievably beautiful and peaceful. The volunteers are tremendous and truly deserve some credit.

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Ski Haus Continental Divide Trail Run - Steamboat Springs - August 20, 2006

Bob Mishler reports:
Distance: 16.5 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 3:39
Website: http://www.runningseries.com/races/continentaldivide_trail_run.php

General Summary:
Fish Creek Falls to top of Mt. Werner
Tour of some beautiful country that you might not see any other way!

Things Done Right:
showed up

Things Done Wrong:
ran a long hard run the Friday before

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Pikes Peak Ascent - Manitou Springs, CO - August 19, 2006

Michael Everson reports:
Distance: 13.3 Miles
Goal: 3:45
Results: 3:44:40
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Cool temps in the morning with slight drizzle.
Pleasant in the middle with a little sunshine.
Cooler temps at the top with slight drizzle.

Things Done Right:
Trained all winter. Practiced a lot on Barr Trail. Took the right amount of water and gel (packed light). Stayed at my pace. Took a jacket.

Things Done Wrong:
Forgot to charge watch battery (it died). Needed to take one more salt tab and didn’t. Got hypothermia.

Calculator:

Any Other Stuff:
Course was in good shape considering the rains in the past month. Golden Stairs were in exceptional shape compared to two weeks ago. I ran a PR for the second year in a row. Overall, I’m happy with the result.

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Sergio de Lourenco reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 1. PR (5:43) 2. 5:30 3. 5:15 if all is perfect
Results: Even better than perfect... 5:05
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
What a fantastic day. The temperature was perfect, I felt great and stayed relaxed the entire race. Far exceeded all my goals and took about 3 hours off my time from exactly 51 weeks earlier (also took off 45 pounds). I’d been working towards this for 51 weeks and it was worth every day. Great race!

Things Done Right:
Ate great the days leading up to the race, tapered well, hydrated great during the race. Just took water (to refill my bottle) and gatorade at aid stations, often passing several people at each station. Knew the course well and ran a smart race (which I need to do since I’m not fast enough to run any other kind of race). Treeline training paid off!

Things Done Wrong:
Inexperience got me...I finished with some gas left in the tank. I set my pace at a 5:25 ascent (based off my previous best of 5:43). I felt great the entire race and could have started my final push earlier. That’s what I get for being a rookie.

Calculator:
Used it in June set at a 5:30 pace and was about 15 ahead of pace until 2 to go when I bonked. Worked on treeline a lot after that and came back in July trying for a 5:15 pace and bonked even earlier. So I set the pace for 5:25 on race day. It was hard holding back because I felt like I was going soooo slow, but I didn’t want to crash out... again. Was about 10 minutes ahead of pace from NNC on, even when I thought I was slowing. Regardless, it’s a great way to pace yourself.

Any Other Stuff:
Now, I’m big and slow and this was only my second race ever and I’ve realized one thing...it’s a blast passing people (especially those that have passed you earlier). Walking through the clouds was great! It’s fun listening to people who aren’t familiar with the course talk/complain/wonder as they move on.

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Jon Magistro reports:
Distance: a long darn way!!!!!
Goal: Beat Last year’s time
Results: I Beat last year’s time
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
A great day for a race!!! It was cool and overcast the entire way. No lightning or hail this year.

Things Done Right:
This year my plan was to pace myself really well at the bottom of the mountain, by actually listening to my HR monitor. I kept reeling myself back in to match my HR with the calculator splits I printed out before I left the house. I had been doing a lot of hill work and at my pace the mountain didn’t feel as steep as normal, until above treeline of course (more on that later). My time for the final mile was the best I had ever done, until the log jam of people near the finish.

Things Done Wrong:
I sprained my ankle vey badly in late September last year playing softball. Then I took it upon myself to make matters worse by being a typical man and not going to the Dr for x-rays or rehab! Nice going, huh? Anyway this caused me to take 4 1/2 months off of training. Since I am horizontally gifted, and metabolism(ly) challenged I was able to pack on a good 15 lbs. of hard fought fat!! This made training more of an effort throughout the year winding down to race day. I had increased my weekly mileage but not the amount of time spent at altitude since I had moved out of the PP area. I was tracking perfectly for my goal, but as the calculator page says expect to lose SERIOUS time above treeline. So I followed directions and lost serious time. Actually I just did a poor job of eating above treeline and that cost me the energy needed to push even more. I finally remembered to eat and proceeded to have my best final mile ever, including training runs. Lastly, I was just a few minutes too slow to avoid the long j am of people piled up behind a brave soul who was struggling to finish. I’m glad for his success in finishing however while he was blocking the trail to catch his breath and over falling over multiple times the 10+ people behind him were losing time overall.

p.s. — if this was you... Great job finishing!! Next time please step off the trail for catching your wind, I for one know how hard it is to be passed near the end of a race but in the time we are finishing (we are slow after all) the only thing we have is our time and having to stand on the trail waiting (multiple times) can be a frustrating way to finish.

Calculator:
To those of you who may not know about this or haven’t used it, please do. This tool can make your race and experience sooooo much better.

Any Other Stuff:
I would like to thank every single volunteer who again this year LIED to me at every aid station. Can you believe that these people actually kept telling me that I was looking good???? The nerve of these people!! They must have to fail a lie detector test in order to sign-up bcz they are really good at it. Truthfully though, YOU ARE THE BEST thank you so much for all of your lying.
I will say again, that I will return to fight another day on this mountain. I will keep improving until I finally beat my mother-in-laws time from 20+ years ago....ROCK ON!!!!!!

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Roger Sajak reports:
Distance: 13.1 Miles
Goal: Volunteering
Results: Aided many runners
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Volunteered at “A” Frame for water station for the Pikes Peak Ascent

Things Done Right:
Volunteered

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing went wrong

Calculator:

Any Other Stuff:
:)

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Shawn Erchinger reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 2 hrs. 59 min. 59 sec. OR faster
Results: 2 hrs. 58 min. 53 sec.
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
The weather was just perfect. Nice and cool. The race went well for me from the start. I went out and was extremely conservative over the first mile. Once I hit the trail I kept remembering what Matt told us in practice. I kept asking myself the question “Can I maintain this pace all the way to the top.” I tried to stay focused on running my race instead of trying to stay with Lisa Goldsmith when she passed me 1.5 miles into the race. My strategy worked well and I managed to start passing the walkers over the last 3 miles of the course when I was still able to run the majority of it.

Things Done Right:
Stuck to my pre-race plan to try and run relaxed and maintain my pace all the way. I hydrated well, drank Gatorade at all the aid stations even though it meant walking for 2-5 seconds to get a good drink, and took GU regularly to help me during the final miles.

I trained consistently on the Incline and on Barr Trail. I made it to as many Thursday Incline Club workouts as I could which really helped.

In the last month before the race I my buddies and I drove to the summit and ran 3,2,1s on Fridays and Sundays. This proved to be the smartest thing I did in training. The 3,2,1s really helped me do well over the last 3 miles. Knowing where I was in the final minutes helped me run sub 3.

Things Done Wrong:
I should have done more long runs. I never had one 2 1/2 hour training run to prepare for the race and rarely ran for even 2 hours. Most of my workouts were less then an hour. If I want to run really well in the Ascent I need to put in a lot more time on my feet.

I left two of my GUs in the pocket of the jacket I planned to wear but then put it in my bag at the last minute for a trip to the summit.

I also forgot gloves and needed to borrow a pair at the last second. I have good friends!

Calculator:
Fred wrote his splits on his arm and I was able to memorize them as we walked to the starting line. We trained a lot together and both had the goal of running sub 3. He ran 2:56:24 and since I had his splits fresh in my mind it really helped. I had planned on trying to get to Barr Camp in 1:26 and A-Frame in as close to 2 hrs. as possible. Fred clued me in that I could get to A-Frame in 2:08 and still run a sub 3. I made it to the steel A-Frame sign in 2:07:56. The mile markers along the course seemed to be way off to me so I went with what I knew from running the top 3 miles of the Peak.

Any Other Stuff:
Nope. I’m looking forward to 2007! Sub 2:50!

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Jamie McMillin reports:
Distance: 13.3
Goal: < 5 hours
Results: 824 16/35 Jamie L McMillin 62 Colo Springs CO 4:52:18
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I felt great all the way up to the 1 mile to go sign as I focused on making no ego-driven passes in the first 5 miles, thus preserving resources for the trek from Barr Camp to the summit. Didn’t push it. Sun came out when I finished. Extremely gratified to achieve my goal, as I missed it by 32 minutes last year.

Things Done Right:
Probably the difference maker was in my preparation particularly in doing summit to Barr Camp and back to the summit in 4 of the 5 weeks leading up to the race. Lots of time in altitude.

Things Done Wrong:
Set my goal too low.

Calculator:
NA

Any Other Stuff:
Dreary, overcast weather was perfect, (when compared to driving sleet, rain, thunder and lightning experienced in last year’s race)

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Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 13.32m
Goal: Good training for Imogene. Maintain place in TC Series. 2:40
Results: Remains to be seen. Fell from 4th to 11th oa in Series; 1st to 3rd master. 2:59:08
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
My quads were sore and tired going into the race. I haven’t tapered, thus haven’t been fresh for any race this year. Although Imogene is my target race for the year, I did want to do well here. I did do a modified taper for Pikes.

Started at a comfortable effort, and relaxed. I didn’t worry about my splits, unlike last year. I just ran at what felt comfortable, like you should for the first half of a marathon. I was ahead of all of my splits from last year — 3 min faster to Barr — yet felt more relaxed.

I started to slow a bit coming into Barr. My legs started to tire heading up to Bottomless. Above there, every steep step up started to hurt. On the switchbacks heading up to A-frame, my quads burned with every stride. I ran all the way to the aid station at A-frame, but it just started hurting too much. My quads were done.

Above A-frame, I walked everything steep. I was only able to jog the flatter parts. My HR was in the mid 150s until A-frame. I wasn’t able to move my legs fast enough to get my HR up — low-mid 140s, and never above 150.

I had been passing people until Barr, but started losing places above there. I didn’t count, so I don’t know how many places. I know I lost 8 places in the last mile. I know that Cindy O’Neill, who passed me at A-frame, put over 12 minutes on me to the top. The fact that I broke 3 is just an accident. That didn’t matter to me.

Things Done Right:
Ran relaxed, and at a comfortable effort from the start. Even all the way to the top, my energy felt good, and I never breathed that hard.

Things Done Wrong:
Not sure what happened. I did a sprint workout on Wed, before the race — 30 sec hard, 40 easy. I emphasized leg turnover in that workout, rather than pure speed. However, perhaps I ran it too hard. However, I still shouldn’t have been that sore/tired, and certainly not 3 days later.

There was no lingering soreness, but my legs continued to feel tired for at least 2 weeks after the race. That’s very unusual for me. I’m hoping to feel better at Imogene.

Calculator:
NO! I run by effort. If I do that right, the time will take care of itself.

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Jim Mahon reports:
Distance: 13.32
Goal: 4:08
Results: 4:22:14
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
7815 feet to Heaven

Things Done Right:
Eleven weekends in a row from the start to the finish.

Things Done Wrong:
I need to retire from work (hit the Power Ball) so I can make the Thursday ICer workouts.

Calculator:
Just like last year, I was right on the 4 hr splits until after Barr Camp. Then I started losing about 2 minutes per mile.

Any Other Stuff:
No rain, snow, or sleet. Nice cool weather.

Trail maintenance volunteers did a hell of job considering the recent rains.

No lines at the porta-potties or at the vans???

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 13.3 miles
Goal: 3:30:00
Results: 3:30:20
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I started out too fast! I had checked my time to Ruxton on the previous Thursday run and I made it there on schedule but I made it to Hydro in just over 11 min. I tried to slow down but I had a PR by making it to Barr Camp in 1:40, but I felt good so I went with it! lol. I felt really good at the A-frame and if I would have done things better I might have actually made a better time than I was hoping for. I was not as strong on top this year, but I made my goal!! WOOOO HOOOO!! Well, 20 seconds over but who is counting...right? I had a great ascent this year...I’m considering the marathon next year...hmmm...I will just have to wait and see...???!!! I worked the No Name Creek aid station the for the marathon and what an experience!! You all looked really good going up...but coming down I have never seen soooo many cuts and blood! YEAH!! Neat stuff!! Matt...I have a great pic of you coming down the mountain!! Good job to all!!!

Things Done Right:
Ate well and I have been getting plety of rest recently! I just made the switch at work from graveyards to an 8 to 5! It was good to file down the fangs and become human again. I feel better and my health has returned.

Things Done Wrong:
Started out too fast, but all in all I made my goal that is all that matters.

Calculator:

Any Other Stuff:
Thanks to all of you ICers! The people in this club are truly amazing and wonderful!!

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: sub 4:00
Results: 4:02:08
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
First leg of the anticipated DOUBLE!

Things Done Right:
Well-rested and fueled; hydrated! Maintained steady and conservative pace after Barr Camp.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough HIGH altitude training; in fact, did not train above Barr Camp before races. Used Pace calculator; went out too fast, trying to put time in the bank, and, as always, paid a severe penalty for early withdrawal.

Calculator:
Definitely illustrated my lack of training above Barr Camp!

Any Other Stuff:
Despite missing my goal and PR by a little over 2 minutes, and going out too fast and paying the price, I was able to notch another ascent and stay in the running for my first DOUBLE.

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Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 13.32
Goal: <3.20
Results: 3.49
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
This race needs no introduction. We all know what it is about. :)

Things Done Right:
I was consistent on eating my CarbBooms during the race. also warmed up legs and stomach before the race. Also keeping my own pace and not getting rushed by the Adrenaline.

Things Done Wrong:
I am still analyzing this one. The short answer is that I believe I was overtrained... During the BTMR my racing attitude fell apart between No Name and Barr Camp. Same thing this time around. The last 7 miles I was moving slow and thinking negative thoughts about my performance. I have never been so consistent in my training as I have been this season, but I think it came with the price of exhaustion. I should be better at taking breaks from hard training during the season to recover.
I also did not drink enough during the race.

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Carl Nelson reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 4:00:00
Results: 3:49:52
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
The rain had been falling but by the time of the race, it was cloudy, cool, but no rain — perfect day for a run up the Peak

Things Done Right:
Tried to follow the excellent guidelines given by Matt Carpenter for a successful run up the mountain. Listened to the helpful comments made by the ICers.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t say “on your left” often enough and got really slowed down after Barr Camp. Didn’t anticipate the cramping that would take place in my legs two miles from the top. There was nowhere to go but up!

Calculator:

Any Other Stuff:
This being my first Ascent, I thought the trail was in great shape, much better than me and I look forward to doing it again next year. Thanks for all the help and encouragement each Thursday evening.

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Valerie Deneau-Prothe reports:
Distance: 13.32 mi
Goal: 3:42
Results: 3:53
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Half marathon up my favorite hill! :)

It was a PERFECT day for a PR! The weather was damp and cool, but not raining, the crowd was great, I felt great, and my 2 favorite motivators were there (John and Christine)! However, somewhere along the way I blew it.

I made a lot of gains this training year and knew I was capable of a 3:38-3:45 so, I took the splits for a 3:40, modified them for the crowds on the lower sections and decided on a 3:42 goal. My plan was working beautifully...I wasn’t stressing, pushing, or cussing ;) and I was still hitting my splits (oh this rocks!)

I smiled as I hit No Name knowing I would soon be on the delightful “flats” en route to Barr Camp. I was feeling great when the gams started running out of energy. What the h---? I used a mild expletive or 2 as I kept trying to coax the girls into moving a little faster. They’d humor me a bit, then fall back into a shuffle. I kept trying to push, then I remembered, “Oh yeah...I still have 8 mi to go with much elevation gain!” and I backed off.

Long story short, I ended up hiking much of the last 7 miles of the race and even cried a bit (out of frustration). I couldn’t believe it, my legs were just spent.

Not whining, just very confused...and looking forward to next year! :)

Things Done Right:
- Lots of high altitude
- Great long runs on hills
- Fairly consistent speed work and tempo runs
- Dropped a couple of lbs.
- Slept well
- Ate well
- Laid out my clothes the night before
- Hydrated well
- Took E-Caps

Things Done Wrong:
- Maybe did too much the 2-3 weeks before the race as I felt incredibly fatigued and over trained up until 4 days before the race. Although, I really didn’t think I was pushing it.

- Incredibly stressed out at work the weeks before the race.

Calculator:
I used the calculator as a baseline, but found that adjustments need to be made for the W’s and No Name splits due to the crowds in my time range.

Also, I usually combine Ruxton and Hydro into 1 split. As Ruxton is too slow and Hydro is too fast for me, but combined they work beautifully together! :)

Any Other Stuff:
Just looking forward to next season!

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Michael Hagen reports:
Distance: 13.32
Goal: Not to be too much worse than last year.
Results: 2:42:55, 16th
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I did better than I deserved. This race demands focused, specific training. I didn’t — concentrating on triathlon this year. As I haven’t done any triathlons with a run equivalent to the PPA (I’d love to, if there was one) I didn’t train on the peak other than a hike to Barr Camp with my father-in-law and the Barr Trail Race. So I must be happy, because I don’t think I could expect better.

Things Done Right:
Went rather conservatively, which was appropriate give my level of preparation. Verified that specificity of training is important! :)

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train on the peak. That was a conscious decision given other priorities, but certainly hurt my performance.

Calculator:
As always (4 of 4), I was below target pace until Barr Camp, and then rapidly started falling behind pace thereafter. That was to be expected considering lack of training at altitude, but I also need to figure out how to race the section from Barr Camp to A-Frame. It gets me every time!

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Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 3: 44
Results: 4:18
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Race day weather turned out reasonably good, if a bit humid. Previous few days saw some heavy rainfall, which made Barr trail difficult in places below No Name.
My race went fairly well up to the Bottomless Pit sign, and then progressively “went downhill” after that. From A Frame to the summit I was drained, with each mile taking longer than the last, resulting in a 30 minute last mile! I was staggering at times on the Golden Stairs, and seriously worried about falling off the mountain.

Things Done Right:
Hard to say, right now.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough long hard runs. The six weeks prior to the BTMR I was either tapering for the Mount Washington race (which went very well, due to good I/C training prior to June), or vacationing in Maine. My longest run in Maine was two hours. Any questions?

Calculator:

Any Other Stuff:
The best part of the course was the I/C’s top mile!!!

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Michael Hartley reports:
Distance: 13 and some
Goal: Finish and prepare for the Marathon
Results: Finished and alive for the Sunday fun
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Nervous, but awesome run.

Things Done Right:
Bagals and pasta since Wednesday. It worked. Portioned marathon bar during race.

Things Done Wrong:
I am happy with the results. I know I can handle the double now so I should train with higher mileage and speedwork for faster time.:)

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Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 13.2
Goal: Make it to the top
Results: Made it to the top
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
All things considered I was happy with the way the race went. Hope to be injury free next year.

Things Done Right:
Paced myself

Things Done Wrong:
Could have used more altitude training

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Chaz Lalonde reports:
Distance: 13.3
Goal: Keep the streak going
Results: success @ 3:14:00
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
An overcast and muggy day.

Things Done Right:
Stayed injury free while using Matt’s training schedule C with one small exception. I swam on Mondays after our long runs on Sundays. Also, once we started Thu evening runs I swam on Fridays. I increased the high altitude training runs by staying at Barr Camp for a total of 5 weekends vs 3 last year.

Things Done Wrong:
With the high humidity I should have drank more to keep up with the extra fluid losses [sweat].

Calculator:
I still lose time between Barr Camp and A frame

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 4:00 hours
Results: 4:16
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
One of the most beautiful days to have a race. Nice and cool with clouds NO rain or snow.

Things Done Right:
Started with a good taper, good carb load. Race day plenty of fluids and gel packs. Had a good group for a 4:0 hour pace. At a-frame about 3 minutes off, but after that, I just couldn’t get it going.

Things Done Wrong:
Got cramps in both calves, why is the question ?

Calculator:
Used the cal., it is a very handy tool.

Any Other Stuff:
Many new faces this year, not too many friends.

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Gahlen Crawford reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 4:05
Results: 5:14:33
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I had a tough time above the Bottomless Pit sign.

Things Done Right:
I trained with the IC.

Things Done Wrong:
I ate poorly and had limited rest for the week prior to the race.

Calculator:
I used the calculator and stayed on track to set a PR through mile 8. At that point, my energy was depleted. The remaining 5 miles were grueling.

Any Other Stuff:
My daughter, Rachel, who ran with the IC earlier in the season, blew out her ACL during Basic Training at the Air Force Academy and had surgery this past Wednesday. She is doing well and is back on the Hill.

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Dan Smith reports:
Distance: !3.32
Goal: 3:45
Results: 3:52:49
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I had high hopes for running the Ascent this year in a slighter faster time than last year. But an Achilles injury in March knocked out all running for nearly six weeks. Although I had entered the race, I didn’t make any trip reservations until June. Feeling strong enough to run, but not necessarily faster, I made my way to Colorado with a hopeful attitude. I made it to the IC club time check on Thursday, running it way too fast, so I was determined to go out slowly. On race day I still was too fast at Ruxton and Hydro, but not so drastically that it hurt me. I found negotiating the Ws was far easier, with less congestion than when I had gone out faster. Thanks, Matt!! Thereafter I ran my splits just as planned for a 3:45....until Barr Camp, when my flatlanders lack of altitude training was exposed. My splits tailed off, but I didn’t hit any kind of wall and wasn’t passed by many except for the occasional second waver running faster than 3:15 pace. In fact, it may have been my lack of hill boun ding training that did me in, since I was guarding a tender Achilles all summer. I wasn’t huffing and puffing the last three miles as much as lacking leg strength. Next year: more hills and step up practice and a few more long runs to get better endurance. Overall I was pleased with my results and hungry for another shot at the Peak!

Things Done Right:
Went out easy. Followed my planned splits. Came out to Colorado three days before the race to get acclimatized to some degree. Gave Matt Carpenter a ride down the mountain when I saw him training there on Thursday before the race. Thanks for the training insights, Matt!

Things Done Wrong:
Got injured in March, which put me behind schedule for my best performance.

Calculator: It helps to use it, even a non-altitude trained runner can use it with the caveat that you WILL slow down above Barr Camp.

Any Other Stuff:
Thanks a thousand times to the volunteers who make this special race possible for us obsessed Peak runners.

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Leadville Trail 100 - Leadville, CO - August 19, 2006

Anton Krupicka reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: in descending order: win, sub-17, sub-17:16, sub-24, sub-25, finish
Results: 17:01:56
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
I had a pretty sleepless night before this race. I was kind of keyed up/nervous after the pep-rally-ish action in the gym Friday morning, plus I’d been thinking about this race a great deal the last couple weeks and was excited that it was finally here. Also, for some reason, I had a splitting headache (that was still there when I woke up at 2:45am for the start). However, none of this was actually made any worse by the fact that my chosen abode for the evening was the Ice Palace City Park restroom (lots of rain Friday). Surprisingly cozy and clean as far as public restrooms are concerned!
I very nearly missed the start of the race because I was taking too much time in the bathroom (which makes me 3 for 4 for near misses of starts at races this summer. hmmm. maybe I should work on that.), so I spent the first downhill and asphalt mile hoping the lead pack wouldn’t disappear into the dark night without me and wondering just why in the hell everyone was running so freakin’ fast. it’s a hundred mile race for chrissake!
Once we hit the Boulevard I noticed that Steve Peterson had already taken WAY off.he must’ve sprinted off the line, so I spent most of this section running near Dan Vega and Karl Meltzer at the front. Right at the bottom of the rocky downhill at the bottom of the Boulevard Dean Karnazes came charging up to my shoulder. and that was the last I saw of him until I was on my way back to Leadville. We also caught Steve by the bottom of the Boulevard.
When we hit the powerline cut up to Turquoise Lake, Dan and Karl walked while I ran so I was forced into taking the lead onto the lake trail. Dan soon caught up and I appreciated him running behind me with his uber-bright flashlight. mine was proving to be a little deficient. After a bit I stopped for a pee break and Dan, Karl, and Steve all ran past me. I tucked in behind Steve, though, and took advantage of his light until he inexplicably stopped for some reason, so I easily caught up to Dan and ran with him all the rest of the way around the lake to Mayqueen. At one point, maybe a mile before Mayqueen, Steve was running directly behind me when he tripped and fell HARD.6’3” is a long ways to fall. I took my first gel when we hit the asphalt and ran into the aid station in 1:49 with Karl and Dan (not before nearly falling on my face as I stepped off the road, however. my only trip-up of the entire race). I felt like this split was slow-ish, but it was very, very easy and I felt like the darkness had made going any faster around the lake a bit of a liability.
Leaving the aid station, I exchanged water bottles with my crew, picked up an extra gel, dropped off my headlamp (all completely on the run), and took off up the road towards the Colorado Trail in the lead (I could think of no reason why I should’ve dallied around in the aid station. so into the lead I went). Back on the trail, Karl and Dan caught up with me (I was running very easily because I didn’t really want to be in the lead) and let Karl pass me because he expressed interest in going a little faster on the rocky sections. Fine with me. However, when we hit the first little uphill climb leading up to Hagerman Pass Road, both Dan and Karl started hiking and I kept running and that was the last I saw of either. I ran as comfortably as possible going up Sugarloaf (stopped to pee once and was pleased to not get caught), and couldn’t even see any pursuers on those tight switchbacks up there even though I was constantly reminding myself to slow down and take it easy. Descending Sugarloaf I just tried to go as quickly as I could without imparting an undue amount of stress on the quads. I hit the woods at one point for a 27 second pit-stop and was pleased that the gap had grown enough to where no one caught up to me.
Going into the Fish Hatchery (3:16) I got a little confused (why do you have to run through a garage?), but everything went fine (exchanged bottles, picked up a Powerbar and more gels from my crew) and saw that Karl was coming in right as I was leaving (I had maybe a 1-2 minute lead).he must’ve run the downhill pretty hard. On the next road section I focused on chewing my Powerbar and taking it easy. Seeing Karl at the aid station had got my competitive fires stoked though and I found it hard to keep the adrenaline under control. I saw my crew at Treeline and finally quit worrying about anyone catching back up to me (I couldn’t see anyone behind me on the road). Running up the road to Half-Moon it hit me that A.) Four hours is a long run, no matter how you look at it, and B.) I was still a ridiculously long ways from being done. It was on this road that I first had the slightest hint of any fatigue.I figured that wasn’t too bad considering I’d been running for four hours.
The Half-Moon aid station (4:10) was frustrating because I just wanted a couple cups of water, but I couldn’t find any and ended up slamming a cup of Coke instead. Why is it so weird to not want to spend a lot of time (not making any forward motion, I might add) in the aid stations? I was super-psyched to get on the Colorado Trail over to Twin Lakes, because that trail is awesome. The hill at the beginning felt easier than it did on training runs and this whole section of trail was pretty much without incident. Except that it got really foggy and started raining a mile or two before Twin Lakes. On the section of singletrack from the beaver ponds to the jeep road my legs felt really, really good so I was excited about the next uphill section.
I hit Twin Lakes in 5:30 in pouring rain (apparently a lot of people were snickering at my shirtlessness at this point, but I was completely comfortable.my philosophy is: the less clothes I wear the less I’ll sweat and the less dehydrated I’ll become), so I picked up a shirt and a jacket from my crew and headed across the meadow and river to Hope Pass. I hadn’t decided if I was going to hike Hope Pass or not, so I just decided to base it off of the effort it took. As it turned out, I felt great and ran all the way to the Hopeless Aid Station (6:42). During the climb I ascended above the clouds and blue sky broke out for the first time all day .so much for needing a shirt and jacket---they just ended up around my neck and waist.
I hiked everything except for the two or three flat switchbacks from the aid station to the top of the pass (6:56) and then just focused on getting to Winfield. I tried not to really kill the downhill, but it seemed that opening up a little at times caused less pounding on the legs than constantly trying to brake. I got to the Winfield road in 7:23 and then took it as easily as possible running up the road into Winfield (but, I remember thinking that I was definitely starting to get a little tired), which I reached in 7:45. This split certainly surprised me (well, I guess not that split so much as how quickly I was able to run from Twin Lakes to the top of Hope Pass.this is where I had been planning on going a lot slower than I did).
I came into the aid station excited to get rid of my shirt and rain jacket and to pick up my first pacer, Alex Nichols (Noah Zark), but not a single member of my crew was anywhere to be seen! Consequently, I broke my stride for the first time all race to snag three gels and a Powerbar and refill my handheld bottle from the aid station. As I ran out of the station I threw my jacket on the ground and yelled (to anyone that would listen) to tell my crew to pick up my jacket for me. After about five minutes of running back down the road while gnawing on a Powerbar, Alex came sprinting down the road carrying two water bottles and plenty of other fuel, which proved to be a very good thing. In retrospect, if I had indeed gone back up Hope Pass by myself I wouldn’t have had nearly enough food or water. Apparently, they hadn’t expected me for another 15 minutes, so Alex and Nick were in the bathroom and Julian and Angie were mixing Powerade. It turned out to not be a big deal.
Fifteen minutes after leaving Winfield, Alex and I ran into Steve Peterson coming up the road. He was moving very slowly, and I was moving quicker (going downhill), so I figured I had nearly a 35 minute lead on him at that point. Alex also informed me that Steve had looked terrible when he came into Twin Lakes at 40 miles and had only been 15 minutes or so behind me.
When we left the road and hit the Sheep’s Gulch trailhead, we started hiking immediately. The trail up that side of Hope Pass is just so steep (and incredibly rocky at first). I really can’t envision myself running that portion of the course during the race any time soon. The sun was also out now and I was sweating a lot. Alex kept on reminding me to eat and drink which was good because I definitely felt like I was hitting the hardest part of the course yet. The nice thing about an out and back course is being able to see how close your competitors are. Well, everyone was a long ways back. I figured that unless I really, really crashed and burned (always a possibility), Steve should be my only real concern because of his penchant for running fairly evenly-splitted races. As it turned out, he reached Winfield in 8:19 (which he said was a PR for him) and ended up having a pretty terrible second half. But I knew he couldn’t be counted out.
Well, by time we got to the top of Hope Pass (9:07) my legs were feeling good and recovered from all the walking and I made maybe my single worst running move of the whole race by starting a pretty quick descent. Alex sprinted ahead to the Hopeless Aid Station (9:14) to refill the water bottles I’d been guzzling while I just blazed on through. He soon caught up though and we ran down the trail passing all sorts of runners coming up the trail. All of their comments served as a big motivational boost and Alex and I may have overdid it a little bit as he tripped and ate dirt at one point and even now three or four days later says his quads are still sore (he’s not much of a downhiller.I’m not sore at all). Either way, we splashed through all the river crossings and came back into Twin Lakes at 9:59 for what I think might be the fastest ever split on that section. At the time, it really didn’t feel that stressful, but I think it might have sparked the crappiness that was to ensue for the next 25 miles or so.
I picked up a new pacer at Twin Lakes (Nick Campbell), and we started the climb back up to the Colorado Trail. I alternated running and walking (depending on the severity of the gradient), but actually felt a lot better on this uphill than I’d anticipated. Towards the top of the climb up to the beaver ponds there are a bunch of false “summits” and I began to lose a lot of my snap. I remember remarking to Nick to not take it personally if I started becoming particularly whiny and complaining and that things would be a lot better if “gravity would just show me a little love.” The trail at this point becomes quite moderate with generally a lot of flat and even downhill terrain occurring and I was able to run a great deal, but I remember there being one or two fairly short uphills in particular that I walked and I had been planning on absolutely running this entire section of trail. We finally hit the extended downhill leading to Halfmoon road right when it began raining, then raining hard, then hailing. None of this really bothered me, but it just sort of added to my overall mood of despondence and “let’s just get through this goddamn thing.” Once we hit the road, I was at least able to maintain a very consistent running tempo, but it was much much slower than I’d anticipated being able to run this section. At least a minute per mile slower. I mean, after the aid station (which we reached in 11:43, didn’t stop at all) this section is pretty much all slightly downhill and smooth road. However, instead of making some serious time, I was in let’s-just-keep-running-and-not-walking-mode, which was pretty disappointing for me, but hey, the reason I was doing this race was to see what happens on the far side of 50 miles, and I was finding out.
By time we made it to my crew at Treeline it had stopped raining so I dumped my two shirts while Nick picked up a dry one and we continued on our way down the road and over to Fish Hatchery. God, this section sucked. Every step was hurting. knees, ankles, hips and the unvarying smoothness of the road was doing absolutely nothing to help me get out of my funk. I just needed to be using some different muscles. At one point in this section the road is ever-so-slightly uphill and even this tiny difference in grade did a lot to help me pick up the pace a bit just because I was using my muscles differently. Well, we finally made it to Fish Hatchery in 12:45. I’d hoped to run that 7 mile section at least 5 minutes faster, but there didn’t seem to be much I could do at the time, as Nick was having to constantly remind me to drink because I was getting too lazy to simply lift the bottle to my mouth.
At Fish Hatchery I felt like I needed to do SOMETHING different, so for some reason I snagged a couple cookies, but only ate one. I also picked up a new pacer, Julian Boggs, who was rarin’ to go. I think this, combined with the fact that I was so excited to get to the bottom of Sugarloaf simply because I knew I would be walking it made me have a little break in the badness and we actually ran a decent pace over to the bottom of Sugarloaf. Julian also began relaying a bunch of amusing/somewhat insulting stories from their talks with other crews at the aid stations that got me kind of fired up. (For instance, Steve coming into Fish Hatchery in the morning, throwing down his two water bottles, and demanding, “and find out who that shirtless kid is!” Or all the old, grizzled crew members who assured my crew that no one as young as I could expect to go out that hard and lead the whole damn race. Not to mention, whisperings that my crew was a “bunch of idiots who don’t know what they’re doing.”)
As a result, the beginning of the Sugarloaf climb actually went pretty well. We hiked it pretty hard, and I didn’t feel horrible running the first little downhill sections. I even ran a few (very few) of the more moderate less steep sections. However, by the time we had gotten to the final downhill before the top, things were getting pretty ugly. Whereas coming into Halfmoon road I’d been able to really rock the downhill sections (dropping my pacer, Nick), on this downhill it was a struggle to even run, let alone run quickly. I was just tired. Bonking. I hadn’t eaten/drank any less, my body was just really going through a low point. However, on the final climb to the top of the pass, I was still excited for the downhill side because I thought I could make up a great deal of time on the extended downhill. Plus, I was thinking it was “all downhill” from there to Leadville (figuratively speaking, obviously).
Well, when the flat on the top of the pass came, I was having a really hard time running. It was very, very slow. And then I had to make a bathroom stop, urgently. For some reason, that really took it out of me. Moments later I had to stop again and this time what was coming out was not pretty. And I felt horrible---dizzy, weak, kind of stumbling/staggering down the pass. I was WALKING. DOWNHILL. And Julian was dropping me while walking. I just didn’t have it in either my legs or my stomach. I hadn’t completely given up mentally, though. Thoughts of walking the last 20 miles in 7 hours definitely crossed my mind, but then a couple moments later I’d be running again. And then I’d have to walk again. Finally, from about the mud puddles that are half-way up Sugar Loaf pass, I was able to run all the way down to Hagerman Pass road. I definitely remember walking another section or two on this road, but ran (very slowly) most of it, mostly because when we rounded the curve before dropping onto the Colorado Trail, there was a woman there taking pictures or something. There were more than a couple times on this section of road that I turned around because I thought I heard Steve coming up behind me. I also remember commenting to Julian that if Steve caught me there would really be nothing I could do. As slow as we were going, there was no way we were going to go any faster.
Getting onto the Colorado Trail changed things. I ran all the first downhill part, and then walked little uphill sections and then ran anything flat or downhill. Having to change my stride and step over rocks and pay attention to my footing made a ton of difference. Finally, maybe about a half mile from Mayqueen I started running for good and then REALLY running again. I’d been thinking about getting to Mayqueen for so long that when I got there (14:57) I felt like I should stop and do something (I’m not sure what.sit down? eat a bunch of food? take a nap?), but what I ended up doing was eating a cookie (I was so sick of Powerade and Powergels), grabbing a handful of M&M’s that I just tossed on the ground, fumbling with a bottle of Powerade that I ended up not taking (Julian: “Dude, what are you doing? Let’s go, we have PLENTY of food and liquids!”), and finally exiting the station after wasting less than a minute. However, mentally, I was still just thinking about finishing. Coming into Mayqueen I’d yelled to my crew to have warm clothes and headlamps ready at the Tabor boat ramp because I was anticipating a long, slow crawl into the finish.
Things were definitely way better once we hit the trail going around Turquoise Lake, but for some reason I still couldn’t run all of the little uphills that punctuate that section of the course. However, when I was actually running I would get moving at a pretty good pace. Then, about 15 minutes from the boat ramp, something switched in a big way. I started running and it actually felt sustainable. When I got to the boat ramp (15:55ish?), Julian stopped and I picked up Alex as a pacer again and for some reason I REALLY started running. Alex said that they’d overheard Steve’s crew at Fish Hatchery and that he was about 50 minutes behind me. This really lit a fire under me (I’d thought he was a lot closer) and from there to the bottom of the Boulevard Alex and I ran HARD. He commented later on that because he was carrying so much crap (extra clothes, food, headlamps) there were times when he was actually struggling a little to keep up. All I know is that from the dam to the bottom of the Boulevard we were really moving. Close to 7 minutes/mile (well, at least it felt really fast after 95 miles or so of running).
At the bottom of the Boulevard (16:28 or so, I think) Alex and I hiked up that little rocky hill while I sucked down one last gel and drank some water. I’d almost completely neglected the food and drink ever since Mayqueen. At the top of the hill we started running again and I felt much better than expected and just started focusing on sub-17. This was astounding to me considering how recently I’d been questioning if I was going to be able to do anything but walk to the finish. All the way up the Boulevard, though, I’d be feeling pretty solid one minute, and then I’d hit a little bad patch and have to slow it down quite a bit again, but I definitely ran the entire way. When we finally hit the pavement (which I knew to be about a mile from the finish) and picked up the police cars, it looked like breaking 17 would be really close, but then we hit the last asphalt uphill-which I ran-but it definitely crushed any hopes of a serious charge over the last mile. The last few blocks (half mile or so) before the finish were awesome. I felt really good and ran strong into the finish. When the police cars put on their sirens I finally realized that Steve wasn’t going to catch me and I’d won the damn thing.

Things Done Right:
I trained pretty damn hard for this race. Six days a week I was doing at least a 20 miler in the mornings plus a short easy jog in the evenings. I trained A LOT on mountain singletrack trails with tons of climbing. I now believe very strongly in back-to-back long runs on the weekends. My last big weekend (two weeks before the race) I ran from my apartment, through the Garden of the Gods, up Pikes Peak, and back for a 50 miler on Saturday, and then ran up and down Pikes Peak plus a little extra for a 30 miler on Sunday. Attending IC Thursday workouts the second half of the summer definitely had a positive effect on my ability to run up hills (mountains) more quickly and easily. This summer I also really slowed down all of my daily runs and pretty much became more concerned with time rather than distance. For instance, I would think about going for 2:40-3:00 runs instead of 20-22 milers. This allowed me to put in a lot more time without destroying myself with a bunch of “medium-hard” runs like I have in the past. Also, I tapered fairly significantly for this race. That’s something I didn’t do all summer because none of those races were nearly as important to me.

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe I went out a little too fast (particularly over Hope Pass the first time). But, hey, I gave it a shot, and I’m not completely convinced that it was a bad thing to do. Obviously, I don’t have much experience with these things, but it seems to me (and, according to such people as Paul DeWitt) that most people have some sort of significant bad patch in almost every 100 miler they do. Looking at Matt’s race last year, it seems like he never had a bad patch. I don’t know if that’s due to better preparation than I (possibly) or luck (also, possible), but I feel like if I’d somehow been able to avoid whatever was happening to me physically coming down Sugarloaf that I would’ve been able to come within an hour or so of Matt’s record. Again, I still have no idea what made the difference before and after Mayqueen, but there was no tangible difference in my actions (i.e. difference in fueling or liquids) to affect such a difference in my ability to run.

I should really stop coming so close to missing the starts of races. It’s a good thing I don’t run 100 meter dashes instead of 100 mile dashes.

Any Other Stuff:
It’s very inspiring to see people who are out there all night. I mean, I had a good night’s sleep and people were still coming in the next morning! However, at the upper end of the sport, I think there needs to be a reconsideration by some of the top ultrarunners as to how hard they’re willing to train in order to have a good race. One hundred miles is a long LONG ways! I think you must be willing to run A LOT! In the end, if you don’t truly enjoy the training aspect, I don’t think you’re going to have much fun being an ultrarunner, because a lot of preparation is required.
Also, I was surprised at how offended some people were at some minor transgressions of mine against the so-called “conventional ultra-running wisdom.” I got a fair amount of guff for only carrying one water bottle (it wasn’t that hot out), wearing racing flat-type shoes (it’s what I train in, these are the beefiest shoes I’ve run in in over 2 years, and carrying any extra weight for that long is a huge disadvantage), wearing short shorts (hey, they have pockets for my gels--beyond some cursory coverage, that’s all I want out of my shorts on a run of this length, and if they get wet they dry out A LOT quicker), and not wearing a shirt for most of the race (again, less sweat=less water I have to carry=less weight).
Overall, Ken and Merilee do an outstanding job with this event.

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: Finish
Results: Finished — 24:19:52
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/

General Summary:
I finally decided to run Leadville 8 days prior to the race. I had completed Western States in late June and had never run two 100-milers in a year, much less 8 weeks. I had rested and my long run was a 50K in Leadville 5 weeks prior to Leadville.

I arranged to stay with Gordon and his family that weekend and really felt relaxed knowing my only goal was to finish. I slept well the three nights leading up to Saturday morning and felt ready to run and finish the 100 miles.

I ran the first sections into May Queen and Fish Hatchery very conservatively and felt strong. I was 171st in MQ and 107th into FH. Both of my IT bands seemed to be acting up, but not like they had the previous year. After Half Moon the pain went away, or I just forgot about it.

I arrived 67th at Winfield in exactly 11 hours. The climb over and down Hope had gone well. On the return, we encountered rain, sleet, hail and some very cold wind the last 2 miles. I hustled down the mountain to get back into Twin Lakes to warm up at the lower altitude. I kept saying to myself, you’re going to hurt, but from TL into HM and beyond I was moving right along getting into FH 42nd at a little over 18 hours.

Once I got to the trail head at the road to go up the power line and over Sugarloaf, I reminded myself that it would take 90 minutes and forget about how many false summits were in store going up. From the trail head to the summit was a little over 70 minutes and into MQ I felt really good taking less than 3 hours to go from FH to MQ and be 42nd in.

My run into Leadville went really good as my time from MQ was 11 minutes faster than any previous finish. I look back to the conservative first half as the reason for my PB at Leadville and my strong finish 24:19 and 37th

I got the monkey off my back of last year's DNF and look forward to some easy running for a few months.

See you on the trails!

Things Done Right:
Ran conservatively the first half. Went into the run wanting to finish and not worry about time (just under 29 hours) or who was in front or behind me.

Things Done Wrong:
Taken care of a rock in my left shoe first thing instead of running 40 miles before changing socks and shoes on the way in at Twin Lakes.

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: To finish under 30 hours and enjoy the adventure
Results: Finished under 30 hours and enjoyed the adventure
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/

General Summary:
Here we are at the start, the Court House on Harrison in downtown Leadville — from this point on referred to as Pbville. I want to say here and now, as my daughter whispered in my ear, “no matter the outcome — I am SO proud of you"... this isn’t only about the “runner” but the love and support that gets you to the finish line. My first attempt at completing 100 miles in the high country of Colorado would be shared with my family and close friends.
Meanwhile, back to the start line at the Pbville Court House.
Ted and I looked about for other CRUD runners — but our headlamps picked out no familiar faces. We knew that Paul Smith, Judy DeWitt, Keith Grimes, John Genet, Larry DeWitt, Harry Harcrow, Dan Vega, and Anita Bower were there and ready to go.
5-4-3-2-1... The mayor of Pbville fired a 20-guage shotgun into the cool dark morning air BLAM! I Love Ultra starts, the 2006 Pbville 100 Race Across the Sky was under way.
It was amazing turning around to see the wave of lights bobbing weaving their way down the boulevard as we made our way out and up the cutline under the powerline to the single track that edged along Turquoise Lake. The night’s rain had stopped as I gazed at the stars, and settled into a steady pace that I hoped I could sustain. The sun started to rise reflecting in Turquoise Lake, it was going to be a great day.
Reached Mayqueen in 2:33. Not bad, my pace strategy was to come in at 2:30. My amazing crew made up of Carole (best support person ever), daughters Carly and Katie, my son-in-law Jason Frank, Katie’s boyfriend Peter Chapman, and buddy Jonathan Veteto, had everything ready. I was out of the aid station in 4 minutes. Not exactly Matt’s time — but I made every attempt to get out quickly — not sitting unless I needed a shoe change. My strategy was to take on about 500 calories at each aid station, walking if necessary to make sure I was refueling properly.
Peter would describe what lay ahead — total miles, run/walk ratio, and projected arrival time at the next aid station. Next “up” Fish Hatchery, to get there we connect to the Colorado Trail and the climb (1,200 feet) over Sugarloaf pass. We came off the Colorado Trail and turned up Hagerman Pass Road. This section held some very cool memories. A few short weeks previously I had joined Doug, Bob, Sarah, Jim & Rick on my first Kenyan High Altitude Training Camp. We spent 5 days above treeline in two huts — part of the 10th Mountain Division hut system. The training camp must have worked as I was able to combine running and a good power walk pace to the top of the pass. You’re at the summit of the pass when you cross under the powerlines, from here it’s a fairly steep downhill. It felt good to run, picking my line through the wash out ruts knowing this was a quad thrasher I let gravity take over.
I came into the Fish Hatchery aid station in 4:55, out two minutes later. I had hoped to be out around 4:45, I had wanted to build a buffer to stay ahead of cut-off — and would have to pick it up some. Heading out of Fish, trying to find some runnable shoulder sections away from the pavement, Carole’s MDX passed with hoots of encouragement. A short time later, I saw her approaching, telling me she had dropped Peter and Katie at Treeline, and was heading back to town to pick up Jason and Jonathan — my two pacers who were back at the house grabbing some zzzs for the long night ahead. Basically blew through Treeline, saying bye to Katie and Peter, as a few rain drops started to fall. Out I went onto Halfmoon road which is a dirt road that leads up past the Mt. Elbert and Mt. Massive trailheads. I mixed running and walking, continuing my strategy to walk the ups which were some pretty decent climbs. Some oncoming vehicle traffic from the plentiful camp spots in the area.
It was here is where my crew and I had our only mix-up. The aid station at Halfmoon is not accessible to crew! Later I kicked myself for not paying attention to the course description — which plainly stated this fact. I think it was harder on my crew — as they had no way of knowing if I needed anything or the shape I was in. What they didn’t know was I hit Halfmoon in 6:30 feeling great.
The remaining 9 miles into Twin Lakes is a mixture of significant climbs, followed by some decent down hill. There is a long downhill section (3.5 miles) into Twin Lakes. I was feeling a slight tightness in the quads — but no worries — as I had my timer set to pop S-Caps (capsules containing sodium, magnesium, and potassium) every hour. Just to make things interesting, there’s a short steep rocky stretch coming into the aid station, last year while crewing for Ted I saw a number of runners crash in front of cheering crews and spectators. I made it to Twin Lakes in 8:40. I quickly made my way through the aid station to pick up my choice of refueling calories — boiled potatoes and salt. Carole and the rest of the crew had everything laid out, first time to sit as I changed socks and shoes. Katie swapped out my Camelback bladder, while Peter calmly told me I was about 12 minutes off my target pace — and to pick it up where possible. From here it was on up over Hope Pass and down into Winfield. It was about to get interesting. It’s here where Leadville really starts!
This was the one section I was most familiar with, having paced Ted the 10.5 miles in from Winfield to Twin Lakes in 2005. The first 1.5 miles or so are fairly flat, with several creek crossings. One in particular was about mid-thigh with climbing rope stretched across. The cold water felt good. Running out of the flats and into the trees, I began the climb up Hope Pass.
I settled into a steady cadence, a power walking pace that I could sustain. Not too far into the 3,400 climb I saw some familiar faces coming down the trail towards me — Rick and his fiancé Jill who had hiked Hope earlier in the day to cheer on the members of Team CRUD. A few final strategic words from Rick, then keeping my momentum it was onwards and upwards. A short distance later running down came the race leader Anton (Tony) Krupicka. Tony is 23 and one a hell of a runner. He joined in on the Wednesday night social runs out of the Colorado Running Company, today looked as he always does; racing flats, no socks, no shirt — no water! He looked strong, thoughts of Matt’s 15:42:59 record crossed my mind. Tony had at least 1 hour on second place at that point. He was cleaning up at Pbville this year, previously winning a 50 km and the Pbville Marathon a few weeks before.
I passed a sign that read 2 miles to the llamas at Hopeless — the pack animals and the Aid station approximately ½ mile from the summit. This was soon followed by the 1mile and ½ mile to go signs. I kept a strong steady pace into Hopeless, yelling hello to Frenando the llama. I found out that all 18 or 20 of the grazing llamas are named Fernando. The people volunteering at Hopeless are absolutely the best. Entering the aid station I was behind a certain runner who when asked if his refueling requirements were being met — yelled “NO! I need my Camelback filled!” I looked straight at him and said, “Please?” The volunteer that this jerk screamed at, reached out touched my shoulder and said, “thank you.” Coming out of the tent I almost ran into Harry Harcrow who looked a bit dazed. Harry told me later that after seeing me had to go for a lie down. With a wave to the llamas and again thanking all the volunteers I started up to the summit.
The skies were clear, I remember thinking to myself, wow how lucky is this? — good weather over Hope. As I crested the summit I saw dark and somewhat ominous clouds building to the southwest. It was here I saw Dan Vega looking quite strong and easily in the top ten. We said hi to each other, and it was up and over the top. The first section of the descent is switchbacks on loose decomposing granite. The footing gradually got better, with the exception of a couple of skree sections. I tried not to look at the rapidly approaching clouds. The skies continued to darken. From 100 yards down the trail I saw a friendly face moving upwards — Mr. Bidwell. Ted was looking exceptionally strong, I was hoping the very best for him this year, wanting him to wipe last years painful DNF from his memory. He had a great 100 at Western in June, and was running this one ‘relaxed’ having decided to run Pbville a few days prior to the entry cutoff. Following Ted was Keith Grimes, looking a little bit taxed. Keith had battled injury all year and a very recent stomach ailment, but he’s tough. A few minutes behind Keith was Paul Smith — smiling as usual. It was Paul that gave me the encouragement to enter Pbville. Months before, on a cold Thursday winter morning run in Cheyenne Canyon, he convinced that I was ready and it was “time.” Thanks Paul!
Nearing Winfield Road the clouds opened and it started to rain. Then hail. Then bright flashes of lightning — too closely followed by loud cracks of thunder. The footing turned to a slippery slick mud. I thought of my son-in-law Jason waiting for me the aid station, he was pacing me back up over Hope Pass and into Twin Lakes. On a mountain bike trip with Carly earlier in the summer he did a real number on his ankle — severely damaging ligaments. His ankle was still swollen, and it had hampered his training — but Jason is strong and was ready to go. It started to come down harder, not too concerned as I knew I had a warm change of clothes and poncho waiting for me about 40 minutes away at Winfield. I then saw a runner approaching I was anxious to see, Judy DeWitt. There was no way she was going to be the CRUD DNF pink dress Poster Child this year. To make sure was Jim — Paul’s dad who was pacing her whole 50. I called to her across the road giving a thumbs up — telling Jim to bring her “home” safe. Soon after Judy came Anita with her pacer — looking confident and strong. I made Winfield in 12:38, 8 minutes off the pace I had set. I ran into the tent where a rather attractive female said, you look good! I had to return the compliment and said, so do you!
Rain was still falling but there were bright skies in the south giving us encouragement for the second attack on Hope. Jason was ready to go! A change into warm dry clothes and we were off. The road back is a gradual downhill so we were able to run — feeling great. The rain stopped before getting off Winfield road, and soon we were stripping layers. Thank goodness for mules .er pacers. Pbville is the only 100 I know where you can have your pacer carry stuff for the runner (more on that later.) As quickly as the storm moved in — it had moved out leaving clear skies all the way up and over Hope. Even the footing improved. When I asked Jason to pace me on this section I had hoped the summit would be clear. Being a trail runner, climber, and mountain biker from Calgary, Alberta I knew he would love the 360 degree vista. did he ever! Jason was stoked by the whole experience; we may have another ultra guy in the family. Down into Hopeless, we both slurped down Ramen Noodles by the fire. One of the volunteers — who had the same sly grin as on the way up — petted Luke a Golden Retriever an awful lot like our Brewster. I asked him why so happy. His response, “because I’m not doing what you are!” A farewell wave to Luke, the Fernandos, and we continued our descent. I love this section; although the soft pine needle trail was muddy we were still able to maintain a good pace. To divert our attention we had the rushing mountain creek paralleling the trail and the mountain wild flowers. When we came out of the trees into the flats before Twin Lakes, the evening skies were upon us. As the night approached we brought out the headlamps as we saw the twinkling lights of the Twin Lake aid station off in the distance. We got wet going through the creek crossings, before we knew it our lamps picked up Carly and Katie (Team Gordon) patiently waiting at the Twin Lakes aid station. Time in 16:47, over one hour ahead of cutoff — but 17 minutes off strategy pace — Peter calmly pointed out.
Much to his disappointment, Jason’s pacing challenge was over (Thank you Jason!) Jonathan’s adventure was now beginning. A few months earlier running buddy Jonathan Veteto volunteered to be my pacer — for 50 miles if I needed him! He’s planning on running his first 50 soon and wanted to know what it felt like! We tried not to spend too much time here. Another change into dry shoes, and we were off — up the 1,400 feet climb on the trail to Halfmoon. I have heard that this is where the atmosphere of the race changes, it is now totally dark and other runners becoming more and more scarce. A fact is that close to 50% of the starting runners have dropped by this point, with the remaining runners spread out all over the remaining 40 miles. Jonathan kept pushing me where necessary, earlier he had threatened to dangle a beer in front of me and use a cattle prod behind to keep me moving. We headed up, flashlights pointing the way. Every so often we’d see pinpoints of light looking back at us through the trees. At one point hearing runners behind us, we stepped to the side to let them by. As it was pitch black I didn’t realize the ledge where I had stepped actually dropped away from the trail, I started to fall sideways but felt a hand grab my arm and pull me back to the trail. I thanked the Good Samaritan, and realized it was Jenn Shelton (ultra racer extraordinaire) who we had seen earlier at the aid station tent in Twin Lakes. Turned out she was pacing a friend, we “heard” her for the next few miles whopping and hollering. seemed to be really enjoying herself!
As we made it over the inclines and started down to the trail head and Halfmoon road, several strange occurrences took place. A runner came up fast behind us and flew past, we called out great job — but he yelled back saying, “no praise I’m a pacer.” Odd we thought, where’s his runner? A short while later we came upon a runner who was piggy-backing his pacer down the trail! We found out the female pacer had broken or sprained her ankle, the runner who we assumed was her husband or boyfriend was actually keeping a pretty good pace moving down hill. I asked if we could help in any way, holding out a Camelback the runner asked if we could carry it down the hill and drop it at the trail head. “Sure” I said, taking the Camelback which seemed to weigh 10 pounds, promptly handing it to Jonathan. (Thank you for everything Jonathan.) As we approached the trail head an EMT crew complete with stretcher was making its way uphill. We asked what the problem was, only to be yelled at by the crew lead to move out! (Yes sir!)
Coming into the aid station at Halfmoon, we came upon another strange sight. In the ditch was a Range Rover, its front wheels embedded into the soft wet clay while the rear wheels were elevated off the road. We saw several girls sitting adjacent to the vehicle. Thinking they were from the stranded vehicle, we asked if they were okay or needed help. We discovered they were part of the Halfmoon Aid Station Crew, nonchalantly saying the driver ran “that way” pointing down a dirt road at right angles to us. We made the aid station at 19:54, I was shooting for 19:45 — we had picked up 8 minutes in the last 9 miles! We spent 5 minutes in the aid station, eating more Ramman noodles and potatoes with salt in a baggie before heading off down the road to Fish Hatchery.
Feeling jazzed by picking up some time, we decided to run through Treeline and told Team Gordon to meet us at Fish Hatchery — I felt bad as they had everything spread out and waiting for us.. what a crew! Carole tossed me a Boost as we ran past. We headed back along the flat highway section to Fish Hatcheries; I didn’t care for these 4 miles any more than I did on the outbound journey. We arrived at Fish at 21:43 — picking up more time — now just 3 minutes over my strategy pace.
Jonathan told me as we headed up the paved road out of the Fish Hatchery aid station that we just had a marathon to go to the finish line. the only time I thought that 23 miles was a short manageable distance. Now was not the time to get too confident as we still had the climb back up Sugarloaf. I had heard all kinds of horror stories from fellow CRUDers about this section, disembodied floating green glow sticks, false summits, and the climb. did I mention false summits? We spotted and caught up to headlights in front of us, just as we were thinking Sugarloaf wasn’t so bad we’d hit another false summit — another climb and another false summit! The night sky was filled with millions of stars and a sliver moon, as we made it to the top of Sugarloaf we had an incredible view of the Milky Way. We could also see the lights at May Queen, and off to the right in the distance the Lights of Leadville — and the finish.
We knew the worst was behind us. Down we walked/ran on the jeep road until the right turn at the T onto Hagerman Road. My quads were tightening, which made for short sustained periods of running followed by power walking. We continued to catch and pass runners, including one gentleman from California with a bad cough sounding like he had fluid in his lungs who wished us well.
Soon we could see flashlights pointing the way off Hagerman and onto the downhill slop of the Colorado Trail. This section was tough, it became very rocky and muddy trying not to slip as we saw the lights through the trees from the Mayqueen aid station which still seemed so far away. We continued to pick our way down the trail, feeling confident. I had a bottle of No Doz caffeine pills, but we just didn’t need them I was pumped with the whole adventure and what we were accomplishing. Off the trail and onto the pavement, I knew we were about to come into the Mayqueen aid station. This was bittersweet for me as this was where Ted pulled himself out of the 2005 race. We came in feeling happy and strong at 25:18, one hour and 18 minutes ahead of the cut-off time, and 22 minutes ahead of my pace time — I felt incredible. We stayed 6 minutes, having a little stomach trouble I spent most of that time in a porta-potty. I wanted to change into a CRUD shirt for the finish line, but they had all gotten dirty or wet and Carole didn’t have one with my stuff. After running for over 24 hours, emotions were on edge and I got short with Carole and Team Gordon — sorry crew and crew chief — you guys are the very best and I wouldn’t have been able to get this far without your love and support!
Out we went, next stop — the FINISH LINE!
13.5 miles to go, and for the first time — knowing we had picked up so much time in the last section (thank you Jonathan!) I knew I was going to finish. The first section is almost 7 miles of rolling single track around the north shore of Turquoise Lake. We ran and walked this section following a group of runners as it was too difficult to pass on the single track. It started getting light as the sun was coming up over the lake, there was broken cloud keeping the temperature low. As Keith would say, this was now a “multi-day” event. We really lucked out with the weather, even with the rain and hail coming off Hope. As we approached the Boat Ramp, I picked out someone walking her way towards us - it was Carole — with a clean CRUD shirt. After leaving Mayqueen she had gone back into town to the pink house, she washed and dried the shirt and walked in on the course 2 miles so I could cross the finish line in a CRUD shirt. What can I say, Carole you are the best, thank you for all your love and support. We said goodbye to Carole, telling her we’d see her soon at the finish. I was speechless, blown away by Carole’s actions.
Coming off the lake trail and across the road, we dropped down the cutline under the powerline which emptied out onto a wide dirt road known as the Boulevard and 3.25 miles to go. This section seemed to go on forever; slightly uphill we walked for the most part. After what seemed like an eternity, passing runners bent over vomiting, we were at pavement again, 1 mile to go we knew we were almost there. You could start to feel the energy, we turned the corner and up at the top of the street we saw it — the FINISH line banner. A most incredible sight, but nothing as sweet as seeing the smiling faces of Carly, Jason, Katie, Peter and Carole, standing on the curb, still yelling and screaming support. The “best crew ever” came down the street to meet us and with Jonathan we all made our way together towards the finish. I ran in the last few yards breaking the tape in 29:20:32 in 156th place under the 30 hour cutoff, getting a hug from race director Marilee and hand shake from Pbville Race President Ken. Ted was there to congratulate me. The only thing left to do now was to get checked out in the medical tent, and find the cold beer.

Things Done Right:
Stuck with my race strategy

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing really

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Run Through the Pines - Lake Gregory, CA - August 12, 2006

Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Win, Place or Show
Results: 40:02, 9th overall, 3rd in age group
Website: http://www.active.com/results/viewresults_multiple.cfm?filename=1294263_20060812025304.txt

General Summary:
Was traveling a couple of weeks ago and decided to pop in and do this race. Two loops, paved course around a lake, at 5K feet of elevation. Most of the sea level runners complained about the elevation. I complained about the smog.

Things Done Right:
I took three weeks off of running immediately prior to this race (due to a rib injury) and I believe this actually helped me. My legs felt fresh during the entire run.

Things Done Wrong:
The airline I flew the night before lost my bags (with running shoes, shorts, etc.). Went to Nordstroms, since it was close to the airport and open until 9:30PM, and picked up new everything. $200 later (the most expensive running gear I’ve ever bought!) I was ready to go. My recommendation is, if you’re flying somewhere and plan on racing the next day, carry on your gear!

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Squaw Valley Mountain Run - Squaw Valley, CA - August 5, 2006

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 3.6mi
Goal: Solid last LT run before Pikes; 1st master; 36-38 min
Results: Good run. 1st master, 6th overall; 34:25, but run was shorter than I thought.
Website: http://www.bigblueadventure.com

General Summary:
Advertised at 3.6mi, 2,000’, up service/cat roads, at the Squaw Valley ski area (6,200’ base). The actual distance and/or grade for this race must have been less. My time goal was an extrapolation of what I’ve run at the DenverTrailRunners time trial Mt. Falcon (in Morrison), a similar grade over 2.5mi. I was 3 min faster than I expected.

Things Done Right:
Kept it at a LT effort. In other words, I ran it like a training run, rather than waste an all out effort before Pikes and Imogene.

Things Done Wrong:
I shadowed the 5th place finisher too far back, rather than staying right next to him. The race was shorter than I expected. That didn’t leave enough time to reel him in at the end.

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Headwaters Relay - Three Forks to Centennial Valley, Montana - July 28-30, 2006

Gary and Lynn Hellenga reports:
Distance: approx. 222 miles
Goal: Finish, & don’t be late to the BBQ!
Results: Got ‘er done!
Website: http://www.headwatersrelay.com

General Summary:
This was a team relay from the point where the Missouri River starts (at confluence of Madison, Jefferson, and Gallatin Rivers at Three Forks, Montana) to its ultimate source at Hellroaring Creek along the Continental Divide on the Montana-Idaho border. Route crossed several mountain ranges (Tobacco Roots, Ruby Range, and Gravelly Range). We had a team of 7 runners, including 3 who were up visiting from New Orleans. Weather was HOT (90 or more in the valleys, comfortable in the mountains).

Things Done Right:
Recruited a compatible group of runners, and had fun! Employed concurrent leg running on last day in order to finish by the time the post-race party began.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran a sprint event on the track in Colorado the weekend before, and tore my hamstring. My participation in the Relay was limited to organizing the team, cheerleading, watching the kids, and hanging out with the group at the end of each day. Only got to hobble a one-mile leg on the last day of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Good social event! Unlike many other relay races, it is not continuous; it has a fixed number of legs for each day, and when you’ve completed them, you’re off until the next day. Most teams camped together each night, enjoying soaking in the rivers which were nearby at the end of each day’s running.

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Vail Half Marathon - Vail, CO - July 23, 2006

Howard Brooks reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: 3 hours
Results: 2:33.25

General Summary:
I was shut out of my favorite race, the Ascent, so this was going to be the replacement. Just before this race, I got word that I was IN for the Ascent, and this one became a training run. Aiming for an easy 3 hours, I easily crushed that goal without pushing too hard. The Vail half is the most beautiful course I have seen, with 360 degree mountain views on top of Vail Mountain, and this race is well run. Spectators can take the gondola up to the finish line!

Things Done Right:
Trained hard, hydrated well, had fun.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not invite all my friends to join--this is a fun race!

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Wharf to Wharf - Sanata Cruz/Captola, CA - July 23, 2006

Dennis W Murphy reports:
Distance: 6 Miles
Goal: 68 minutes
Results: 71:15
Website: http://www.wharftowharf.com/

General Summary:
Just a fun run along the coast with very little elevation gain. Limited to 15,000 and fills up rapidly.

Things Done Right:
Good dinner in San Francisco on Saturday and hydrated all day. Carried water because water on the course is not well organized.

Things Done Wrong:
Let myself get “caught in the pack” and lost about 2 — 3 minutes over the first two miles (need to be close to the front at the start).

Any Other Stuff:
This event is a little crazy at the start (very narrow and crowded over the first mile). Always lots of entertainment and encouragement along the run. If you go, rooms are a problem in the immediate area. I have stayed in San Jose and San Bruno then drove down the morning of the race.

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Barr Mountain Trail Race - Manitou Springs, CO - July 16, 2006

Jonathan Vigh reports:
Distance: 12.0 miles
Goal: < 2:07:59, run the downhill in < 0:42:00
Results: ran 2:06:48, ran the downhill in 0:44:28
Website: http://runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
I ran the uphill in 1:22:20 (0:07:20 faster than last year). This works out to an average uphill pace of 13:43 min/mile and ascent rate of 2623 ft/hr.

Despite a few challenges (sprained ankle, leg cramps), I managed to run the downhill in 0:44:28 (0:03:42 faster than last year), at an average pace of 7:25 min/mile and descent rate of 4858 ft/hr.

Overall, I took 0:11:02 off of last year’s time with a finish of 2:06:48. I averaged a 10:34 min/mile pace overall, which works out to be 5.7 mph. I placed 9th out of 25 in my age group (25-29 males) and 59th out of 250 males. Five female runners finished ahead of me as well, so I was 64th overall out of 333 runners. Strangely, although I finished 11 minutes faster than last year, I placed further down in my age group (last year I was 7th out of 16 in my age group). Apparently, fluctuations in the number of runners in each age group can really change your relative position from year to year.

I ran a fairly conservative and smart race. I didn’t push myself hard, because my main goal is the Pikes Peak Marathon and I was hoping not to destroy my muscles and have that affect my training during the next week. I only spent 0:11:30 in my zone 5 heat rate (>85% by Karvonen method), compared to 0:32:22 last year and 1:16:38 in 2004. I’m not sure if this means that I’m in better shape and can now go faster for a lower heart rate, or if I really should have pushed harder. Anyway, I can’t argue with the substantial time improvements. Maybe less is more :)

Things Done Right:
I trained smart and hard this year, and it paid off. I ran a fairly conservatively-paced race and ended up performing well both for the uphill and downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
I sprained my ankle and got leg cramps. I ran in the Brooks Addiction road shoe, which didn’t have enough traction or ankle support.

Also, I didn’t carry anything this year — I relied completely on aid stations and only took one energy gel during the race. I probably didn’t get sufficient electrolytes given the heat, which may explain my cramping issues on the downhill.

Calculator:
Roughly interpolating the BMTR calculator results to my uphill time of 1:22:20 gives a predicted downhill split of 0:48:45. My actual downhill time was 0:44:28. I guess this means that I’m an above average downhill runner :) — or maybe I just need to work more on the uphill.

Any Other Stuff:
For my more detailed race report, see:

http://inte099018.halls.colostate.edu/~vigh/running/other_races/btmr2006.htm

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: sub 2:50
Results: 2:39
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
Well-administered trail run; hot weather.

Things Done Right:
Maintained a consistent effort throughout race.

Things Done Wrong:
N/A

Any Other Stuff:
N/A

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Chaz Lalonde reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: make it to Barr Camp faster than in past
Results: 2:15
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
A good race with lots of local competition

Things Done Right:
going up!

Things Done Wrong:
going down! I did not push it on the return but still felt the effects of the race for the next week.

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Gahlen Crawford reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 3:25
Results: 3:18:30
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
Hot. Set a new PR.

Things Done Right:
Trained with IC throughout the season. Set a slower pace from last year heading up but had additional energy to run down faster.

Things Done Wrong:
Gained weight from last year.

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Derek reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: under 2 hours
Results: 2:02:34
Website: http://runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
First time running this race, and it was awesome. Didn’t make my goal, but all things considering I’m happy with the time. Just more to shoot for next year!

Things Done Right:
Kept a pretty good even pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Twisted the same ankle I sprained two weeks before coming down the W’s. I caught up to some slower runners and got my pace out of wack. Wasn’t paying attention and it happened. Hurt like hell and had to slow up for a few minutes. I also wore brand new smartwool socks that gave me huge blisters on my heels. I should have washed them first and tried them out. I know I broke a cardinal rule of racing

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: Under 2:45
Results: 2:46
Website: http://runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Hot day as usual. would like to see race start at 6:00

Things Done Right:
Good carb load and hydration.

Things Done Wrong:
Should of been more aggressive in the W’s.

Any Other Stuff:
Water station for Liberty showed down the traffic flow.

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Andy Dillon reports:
Distance: 12m
Goal: 2 h 30
Results: 2:32:02
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
Ran quite well uphill — resisted the urge to burn out on the W’s as I normally do! Started feeling the heat on the way down though and was glad to see the finish line (not so glad to see Hydro Street though :-) )

Things Done Right:
Good uphill pacing — was getting stronger as Barr Camp approached and passed quite a few people (always a good feeling!).

Things Done Wrong:
Got to work on that downhill! I got passed by about 30 runners on the way down, which is not such a good feeling!

Any Other Stuff:
Great race as usual! A fun event with so many IC’ers taking part, volunteering and supporting. Can somebody turn the heating down for next year please ;-)

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Jon Magistro reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: #1 beat cut-off, #2 PR
Results: made goal #1
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
Boy it was a hot one!!!!

Things Done Right:
I was 5 minutes faster this year on the way up!!! Used my HR as a rev limiter. Stayed positive throughout the entire race. This really came in handy during the downhill when I figured out how close I was going to be to the cutoffs even though I felt spent.

Things Done Wrong:
I’m really not sure. I had been drinking early and stayed on my fueling schedule that I do for my long runs. It must’ve just been not enough long runs that have taken me to altitude coupled with the heat of the day.

Calculator:
I love using this to plug in my times afterwards and see what comes out as an ascent time.

Any Other Stuff:
The volunteers were awesome!!! I really appreciated them along the course and at the finish!! Also the aid stations were fantastic!! I loved the Gatorade slushes they made at no name!!! Thank you Matt, Yvonne, Larry and all the people who help make this a race worth driving 70 miles to do!!! One last note — The shirts were a great improvement this year and getting the medal from Matt at the finish was, by itself, worth all the pain left on the trail!!!

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Valerie Deneau-Prothe reports:
Distance: 12 mi.
Goal: 2:34 (PR)
Results: 2:47
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
Splendid race beginning at 7a in front of the Cog Railway Station up to Barr Camp and back down into a convection oven and ending on a dastardly hill. Between the delightful start and the hellish heat/dastardly hill finale, there are cheering hikers, fellow runners, and well stocked aid stations. The aid stations are manned by some enthusiastic high school students all trying hard to create an oasis (complete with misters and 1 had snowballs) to make one’s trek a little more pleasant.

As for me personally, the race was bad from the start, and I’ve no one to blame, but myself...darn.

It was a hot one and I just don’t do well in the heat and I made the grand mistake of not backing off on my goal. I had to push a bit on the W’s and things jus
t went downhill from there (yet, I was running uphill, hmmm...). By Barr Camp I was really struggling, but I thought, “Hey, it’s all downhill from here, piece o’ cake.” Lord I’m stupid sometimes.... I continued to struggle on the flats down from BC, and just when I thought it couldn’t get any worse, someone turned up the heat. HOLY COW! I ended up being passed by 11 women on my way down and I had nothing in me to hold anyone off.

Overall, still glad I did it, it was (yet another valuable lesson and I got in a nice long run. :)

As for the aid stations, I just want to tell all those nutty students that participated, a huge thanks and that they should be very proud of their efforts, I wish I could have voted for you all!

Things Done Right:
Got plenty of rest, tapered, ate well, put on bug spray and sunscreen, ditched my shirt before the race, ate 3 gels along the course.

Things Done Wrong:
Tried to hit a goal meant for much cooler weather.<

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: To volunteer
Results: I volunteered
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
I wanted to volunteer this year. I was committed to help Larry and the other folks who work so hard behind the scenes to help make this race the success that it is.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t sleep through 4:00 alarm.
Wore sunscreen.
Kept hydrated.
Helped give away “Preems.”
Clicked away at the finish line watching a record number of finishers cross the line — fantastic race everyone!
Got a watermelon from Jeff at CRC — thank you!
Pretty cool seeing all those “sun” GoLite shirts!

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t pull the EPCS&R volunteer shirts.

Any Other Stuff:
Great race Matt.
Congratulations to the BTMR Committee and everyone to helped make this race the best yet.

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Lori Hawkins reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: Beat the cut-off time
Results: 3:05--a PR!
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
A challenging race course, gaining 3,630’ in 6 miles--and back! My favorite trail race, because of the philanthropic use of race fees, the difficulty of the course, and the uniqueness of the location. Plus, it’s close to home!

Things Done Right:
Everything, for a change! Despite the forecast, I did not carry water, trusting that the aid stations would be well stocked, which they were. I did carry gel, but they had plenty of that as well. Last year I bonked in the heat, and did not want that to happen again.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothin’

Any Other Stuff:
Having done Leadville Marathon two weeks prior, with short little runs and a Barr Camp hike between, I did not know what to expect. But I did excellent!

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Ryan Kohler reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2:30:00
Results: 2:20:11
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Great race! The weather was perfect and everything went well. The volunteers made the event!

Things Done Right:
Paced myself up Ruxton and up to the top of the W’s.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing this time around.

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High Mountain Institute 50K - Leadville, CO - July 16, 2006

Anton Krupicka reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: win, break course record
Results: won, broke course record
Website: http://www.hminet.org/page.php?pname=programs/events&PHPSESSID=6337cb3a4ca176773095434d75dd112c

General Summary:
This was my official debut in the world of ultrarunning. It was a very low-key affair, but (not really knowing what the course was going to be like) I was going in hoping to break the course record and go for a nice long run in a beautiful area. Well, I messed things up right away by hanging out in the bathroom a little too long and missing the start by about 30 seconds. Of course, this produced a shot of adrenaline that had me dramatically leaping off the porch of the HMI building, tearing off my shirt, and virtually sprinting after the lead pack for the first 1/2 mile or so until we came to the first major climb underneath some powerlines and up onto the elevation of Turquoise Lake. Almost everyone at the front of the race was walking this uphill (it was very steep, rocky, and loose) but I ran it and had gained the lead of the race (including all the 25k runners who were just doing one loop around the lake) before we were barely even 10 minutes in. From there I just focused on calming down and running a comfortable yet steady pace around the beautiful trail on the shores of the lake. The trail here was initially very soft, smooth, and had little variation in elevation. Soon enough, though, it became quite rocky and technical in spots and I was glad I’d decided to wear my new La Sportiva Slingshots so that my forefeet wouldn’t get bruised. At Mayqueen Campground the course was on pavement for a few minutes (I used the smooth surface as a good time to slurp down my first gel--which tasted horribly sweet) until I came to the aid station in 63 minutes or so. As I was coming into the station I asked repeatedly for water, grabbed a couple cups of what looked to be water and dumped them on my head just as someone told me that it was Heed. I was sticky as hell. Somewhat upset over that whole incident I blindly followed the road left until I realized I hadn’t seen a pink flag in quite a while. After some deliberation I finally turned around and ran back to the intersection just in time to see Rick

Hessek following the clearly placed arrow and flags in the correct direction. I’d lost 7 minutes and was pissed as hell and a little panicked so I hopped on the shady Timberline trail and started passing the 8 runners who had caught and passed me in the last 7 minutes. This climb up Sugarloaf Pass on the Singletrack wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be. A few switchbacks made things a lot easier than they could’ve been and I got through it all without wasting too much energy but still raging about the fact that I may have blown my chance at the course record. Interestingly enough, virtually all of the runners I passed were doing a lot of walking except for eventual women’s 25k winner Keri Nelson. The rest of the run back down Sugarloaf to HMI was on a steep service road under some powerlines that was mostly in the sun and it was getting freakin’ hot out. I spent most of this time trying to descend quickly but not fast enough to trash my quads. As I came down the last part of the descent I cringed at how steep it was when I realized very soon I’d have to be running right back up it. I left the aid station at the end of the first loop in 2:15 (for some reason the aid station was set up around the corner of the porch...kind of confusing and dumb) which with the omission of my bonehead ability to follow course markings put me at 2:08 for the first half. I took down my second gel as I hit the pavement back to the powerlines and then began the grunt back up Sugarloaf. It was definitely hard (and hot as hell), but I kept a steady pace and never felt really out of control or anything and the top came quite a bit sooner than I’d imagined it would. I started getting tired again going back down the singletrack on the other side of Sugarloaf but sucked down my final gel right before Mayqueen (which I left in 3:26) and started running 7min pace or so out determined to get back to HMI under the old course record of 4:26:48. The last hour was pretty uneventful with me just trying to run hard and get around the lake as quick as possible. I was tired but felt very strong right up to the end which I offically finished in 4:23:24, but actually completed the two loops in something more like 4:16, so over 10 minutes off the old course record from 2003. Second place was a looong ways back...at least a half hour or so.

Things Done Right:
Not too much, really. It was very good that I carried a water bottle the whole way--it was hot going up Sugarloaf the second time. I didn’t waste too much time at aid stations, either. I think people lose a ton of time at those things in these ultra races...it’s a race for chrissake! The experimenting with gels went well, but I need to figure out a better transport system...John O’Neill was right about them pulling down my shorts.

Things Done Wrong:
Nearly everything, it seemed. I missed the start of the race and went off course for nearly a mile mid-race because of my chronic absent-mindedness, didn’t taper at all (ran 176 miles the week of the race and climbed a 14er the day before), and carbo-loaded the night before on stale bagels, peanut butter, and oreos. Sweet.

Any Other Stuff:
This race has a pretty sweet course, but I think the director needs to decide if she wants it to be just more than a fundraiser (which is fine, I think HMI is a great organization) and let it become a truly competitive event (I think the BTMR has shown that you can hold a very competitive event while still raising a ton of money for good causes). The race has a good sponsor (HammerGel), a nice prize for first place (a $100 gift certificate to the Boulder Running Company), and the cachet of being held on a portion of the Leadville 100 course, so I think that if these things were advertised a little more explicitly the quality of competition and the number of competitors would increase. All in all, a decent event, though.

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: 6 hours
Results: NOT! 2nd place in the women’s open division.

General Summary:
The HMI 25km/50km is a good training run for the Leadville Trail 100, or any other crazy race one has in mind.

Things Done Right:
Wore my hot-pink leopard-print dirty girl gaiters and ate lots of cheap Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme pies, thus enabling me to chick several guys on the final loop, finishing in a time of 6 hours and 37 minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have took more than one water bottle on the first loop, as it got really hot fast. Forgot that we had to go up and over Sugar Loaf twice! DUH!

Any Other Stuff:
Cheap Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme Pies are the best ultra-food I have yet to discover. Why buy one over-priced crappy tasting organic vegan bar that’s impossible to chew and looks and smells like road-kill when you can buy a whole box of 12 super-yummy Little Debbies for the same price, with even more calories? They may not make you run faster, but with all the money you’ll be saving you can buy yourself some really fashionable dirty girl gaiters and look real cool. And isn’t that what it’s all about?

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Finish — sub 7 hours
Results: Finished — 6:22:20
Website: http://www.hminet.org/page.php?pname=programs/events

General Summary:
Good training run for any altitude races in the coming months. Start is a the HM Institute, just outside of Leadville and the course runs to Turquoise Lake, around it, following the L100 trail, up the Colorado Trail to the jeep road at the crest of Sugarloaf, down the power line trail and back to the HMI, then turn around and reverse the course.

8am start and it was already getting toasty. The lake was crowded with many boaters and campers, on the loop back, the cold beer looked as inviting as the water.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated, ran comfortable and within my goals.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t lubricate my feet and my blisters from WS gave me a few problems on the downhills.

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Garnet Mountain Challenge - Near Big Sky, Montana - July 15, 2006

Gary Hellenga reports:
Distance: 3.6 miles
Goal: Run faster than two years ago
Results: Mid-pack, I think; about 2-3 minutes faster than 2004

General Summary:
This race climbs 2,845’ in 3.6 miles on a single-track trail up to the lookout tower atop Garnet Mountain in Montana’s Gallatin Range. It’s part of American Wildlands’ Gallatin River Celebration. The race wasn’t held in 2005, but was originally done in 2004. It’s not strongly promoted as a racing event (more as just one of several activities going on with the Gallatin River Celebration), so mostly only a few local runners know about it (this year, there were only about 20 racers; in 2004, there were about 40).

Things Done Right:
Paced about right; maybe a little fast at the start, but not too much so. Felt strong in the last half-mile, which is the steepest. Was faster than in 2004 by several minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much. Given the shortness of the race, there wasn’t too much to screw up, other than going out too fast. Lost one place at the end because they changed the finish line location from 2004, and I wasn’t expecting it so soon — could have held the other guy off if I’d known I had so little left to race!

Any Other Stuff:
Hot day — up in the mid 90’s in Bozeman that afternoon. Even in the mountains, it was getting pretty warm by the time we reached the steep, open, upper slopes (race started after 9 AM). The field was small, but fast — it included Nikki Kimball (reigning Leadville 100 and Western States champ) and Nicole Hunt (top American woman at Mount Washington).

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HardRock Hundred - Silverton CO - July 14 - 16, 2006

Rock Cogar reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: 45 hours
Results: 44 hours 47 minutes
Website: http://www.hardrock100.com/

General Summary:
The toughness of this event is bit over the top in my opinion. Average altitude is 11,300’, climb total is 33,000’ same with descent. Pretty much this translates to three high 12ers, seven low 13ers and one low 14er. Weather is anything, same with footing and vertical exposures.

Things Done Right:
Training was perfect which was spending huge time on Pikes Peak and incline. This lead to a Bighorn 100 finish in June. That was followed by more Pikes Peak and incline.

Things Done Wrong:
Oddly nothing. Never fell, never got sleepy, no blisters, really never even hurt.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of cliff side and cliff face on this course which was no big deal on day 1. However on day 2, cliff sides and cliff faces became really scary.

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Summer Roundup Trail Run 12K - Colorado Springs, CO - July 9, 2006

Andrea Cichosz reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: 1:30
Results: 1:30:40
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com

General Summary:
The moderate weather for this race was great. Much better compared to the heat last year. I like the new Adidas T-Shirts.

Things Done Right:
Seeing that coming Sunday is the Barr Trail Mountain Race, this was supposed to be just a training run not a “Go as hard as you can” race. I did that. Ran a lot of the hills. Ran my own race and didn’t get carried away by other people’s pace. Not a super time, but for a training run okay.

Things Done Wrong:
I should have probably ran the course once before, because I relied on my Garmin for the distances and was a caught of guard, when the course was a little longer than the 3.5 mi it had shown.

Any Other Stuff:
My calves were cramping in the first 2 miles, so I went and got a massage after the race. I just about jumped of the table when the lady worked them. I guess it helped, but they hurt all afternoon, but were fine the next day. Maybe I need to do it before the race in the future.

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Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 12km
Goal: Improve Triple Crown standings
Results: 54:59, 7th
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com

General Summary:
I think I moved up two places in the Series overall placings. Not everyone listed in the Series standings is doing the Ascent/Marathon. I padded my lead in the masters standings.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go too hard at the start. Maintained my own effort level when I was getting passed on the hills over the first mile or so. Passed people throughout. Moved up to 10th at the turn. Ran the downhill return as hard as or harder than the uphill to the turn — almost 10 min faster, 32:23 up, 22:36 down. Quickly caught, then pulled away from the three ahead of me. Continued to run hard on the trail, the last 2.5mi, even though there was no one in sight on either side.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably didn’t warm up enough — both time and hard enough (i.e., sprints). A lot of people blew by me on the first several hills. So many, that I didn’t bother counting, and had no idea of my place until the turn around.

Any Other Stuff:
The trail was a little soft from the previous night’s rain, but the footing was fine. The turnaround was a very long way from the 3mi sign — 22:29 at mi 3; 9:54 to go 0.7 mi to the turn; 11:13 for mi 4 (the road didn’t seem that steep and it felt like I was going a lot faster).

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Hank Carey reports:
Distance: 7.44 M
Goal: 1:00
Results: 1:06
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com

General Summary:
Fast, out-and-back trail race from Bear Creek Park up High Drive, parallel to Section 16

Things Done Right:
Very little

Things Done Wrong:
Completely underestimated the course (again!)- particularly the 4th mile, which I turned in a 13:00+ min split. Didn’t attack the downhill as aggressively as I should have, having expended way too much on the way out.

Any Other Stuff:
Great race, great course. Ideal stepping-stone for BMTR to follow and the Ascent. This year the conditions were near-perfect (cool and overcast) although the trail was a little sloppy in spots- not enough so to warrant concern.

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John O’Donnell reports:Sunday July 9th
Distance: 7.46 miles
Goal: under 1:15
Results: 1:21
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com

General Summary:
Cool day trails muddy from past rain storms. Several icers were out racing.

Things Done Right:
Good car load and rehydration.

Things Done Wrong:
None

Any Other Stuff:
Nice to see Matt C. cheering racers on.

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Gahlen Crawford reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1:30
Results: 1:31:53
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com

General Summary:
Nice race but muddy in places.

Things Done Right:
Paced myself well.

Things Done Wrong:
Did NOT do any of the practice runs on Tuesdays or Thursdays

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: none
Results: 1:09:13
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com

General Summary:
Muddy!! It was a really nice morning though. I liked the race being back at Bear Creek but last year's course was really nice as well.

Things Done Right:
Good rest the night before.

Things Done Wrong:
I was still working graveyard shifts. Eww.

Any Other Stuff:
Sorry about so many race reports at once!!

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Trophy Selection Race - Vail - July 9, 2006

John O’Neill reports:
Distance: 4.8
Goal: none
Results: DFL

General Summary:
You guys missed an AWESOME trail race yesterday in Vail. Lots of single track and steep uphill. the course rose 3080 in just 4.8 miles. If this race happens again DO IT!

Things Done Right:
None

Things Done Wrong:
Many

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Mt. Marathon Race - Seward, AK - July 4, 2006

Shawn Erchinger reports:
Distance: 3.5 miles
Goal: sub 50 minutes
Results: 51:47

General Summary:
The 79th running of the Mt. Marathon race consisted of two waves of 175 runners each this year to avoid the bottleneck at the base of 3,022’ Mt. Marathon. After a 6/10 of a mile run on a slope much like Ruxton Street you run into a canyon and hang a right at the base of the mountain. The next 2-3 minutes is spent climbing up a nasty cliff or climbing up a very steep section simply called “the roots” in order to get on the trail that leads to the summit of the mountain. The first half of the race is in the trees and the winding dirt trail is steep. When you approach the halfway mark you come out of the trees and get a look at the ridge that winds it’s way up the remaining 1,500’ of the climb to the summit. After you crest the summit there is a very gentle slope that goes to a big rock you must run around before turning around for the decent. The down trail is very steep for the first several minutes and the scree is loose and soft in places and hard and unforgiving in others. It takes an average runner roughly 5 minutes to descend to halfway and another 5 minutes or so to reach the base of the mountain. Then you have 7/10 of a mile to run downhill on pavement to the finish line. With 20,000 people lining the streets and screaming like crazy it’s a great race to run.

Things Done Right:
I trained on the Incline and was prepared for the climbing portion of the race. My legs and lungs seemed conditioned for the race although I felt I should have been able to run a little faster. I mapped out my route for getting to the trail and made it to the base of the mountain in good position and didn’t get stuck. I was able to pass people on the bottom 1/4 of the course to Squirels Inn. (The Squirrels Inn or Den is a very large tree right in the middle of the trail. You must go around it and once you’ve moved past the tree you are 25% finished with the climb) After this point in the race I maintained my pace. I didn’t go to hard on the downhill and finished strong with no injuries.

Things Done Wrong:
I got to the base of the mountain to quickly. Thus I wasn’t able to pass enough people on the bottom half of the course because I didn’t maintain a comfortable pace in the first 6/10 of a mile. I paid for this mistake throughout the race. My practice time to halfway was nearly 2 minutes faster when I was all by myself.

When one runner passed me going up I didn’t respond to the challenge and let him put a gap on me. I also let other runners who I felt I could have stayed with get away very early in the climb. I just wasn’t mentally strong enough.

I didn’t do enough weight training. My 5 workouts from January through June didn’t do me any good. By not being consistent working out with weights I lacked the strength necessary to climb with the faster climbers. I also didn’t go to the track for any speedwork. Foot turnover is critical in this race because it’s so short.

Any Other Stuff:
Eddie Baxter from Colorado Springs set the record in the 50-59 age group. His time of 50:56 seconds shaved nearly 2 minutes off the record he set in his debut last year.

The course record for Mt. Marathon is 43:23 set in 1981. Most records don’t stand for 25 years.

There is a separate race for Juniors age 17 and younger that only goes halfway up the mountain. You can see the race results at alaskamountainrunners.org.

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Red, White & Blue 5K race - Villa Park, CA - July 1, 2006

Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: <20
Results: 20.10
Website: http://www.villapark.org/rwbraceform2006.pdf

General Summary:
I found this local neighborhood 5K race in Villa Park East of Los Angeles. I was staying in Manhattan Beach for a wedding. The race course started and ended at a High School track and went through the streets of the neighborhood. One small hill and otherwise flat. It was a warm morning and relatively humid. About 200 people showed up for the race.

Things Done Right:
Warmed up with almost a mile of running before race start. Brought my own little water bottle along for the course.

Things Done Wrong:
Did go out a little bit too fast which caused me to slow down later in the race. Did not sleep enough the night before and ate a lot as well.

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Spring Creek Memorial - Steamboat Springs - 7/1/06

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: ~9.5mi
Goal: NA
Results: 1:11:36, 6th place
Website: http://runningseries.com/

General Summary:
The race climbs 1,500’, up a narrow, overgrown trail, along a dirt road for a little over a mile, then descends down a wide trail, with fairly good footing. The RD is a friend. I went up to help out at the race (set-up, finish line, etc.).

Things Done Right:
Ran a steady effort. Focussed on new, downhill technique. Not the least bit sore after the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Directed two races the week before. I felt pretty tired. I was in 5th, and within sight of (~1:15 back) of 3rd on the upper road. I am a good downhill runner. I should have easily made up that distance. Not only didn’t I, but I got passed, and then run away from on the descent.

Any Other Stuff:
I had a bad race the week before a good race at GoG. Hopefully the same thing will happen at the Summer Roundup.

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Leadville Trail Marathon - Leadville, CO - July 1, 2006

Bob Mishler reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 6:00
Results: 6:01:35
Website: www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Challenging run to Mosquito Pass and back, with some fun around Owl Mountain. Terrific views. Out and back these days, unlike the old “Mosquito Marathon.” Old Mosquito Marathon was a little different every year, with something unusual thrown in.

Things Done Right:
Rested up a little. Drove to Leadville Friday afternoon. Enjoyed dinner at Zichitelli’s or something like that. Seems like the restaurants are different every year.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing.

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 6:30
Results: 6:18:16
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/display.ihtml?id=144&step=2

General Summary:
Trail marathon, out and back from downtown Leadville to Mosquito Pass.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t give up when cramps halted my descent from the pass; didn’t linger at the aid stations — thanks Matt!

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t properly hydrate early in the race ... probably because of the cooler temperatures and the distance between aid stations compared with recent road marathons run.

Any Other Stuff:
Well-orchestrated race with beautiful scenery; highly recommended!

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Lori Hawkins reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi
Goal: 7:00
Results: 7:13 or so
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Tough course, rocky, net altitude gain up to Mosquito Pass (where my husband proposed 13 years ago) is 3,000’ starting at 10,162’. Good weather, thunderstorms held off til afternoon. Good snacks, but no gels. My first marathon with this older body (only other one was 25 years ago) but even with 6 miles left, I felt remarkably well. I ended up walking most of the uphills after the first few miles, but downhills made me feel like a new person.

Things Done Right:
Trained with IC, trained on trails and hills, learned what to bring on practice runs. Ran solo and with friends, and did some altitude training the month before. Tapered, and got a massage the last week to smooth the kinks out. Warmed up well, so the Achilles tendon didn’t bother me. Able to run most of the way after the last aid station (except that little nasty uphill section), finishing strong!

Things Done Wrong:
NEVER try new things during a race. I bought a new fanny water bottle, and the thing bounced every step I ran. No gels, which I trained with. I brought a few, supplemented with PowerAde, which I did not train with, and whether it was the P.A. or the pack, I developed a bad side stitch whenever I ran in the 2nd 1/2.

Any Other Stuff:
I am so proud that I am not walking down stairs backwards today! Legs are tired but not sore, and I am looking forwards to another race at this distance.

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Anton Krupicka reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: win, break course record
Results: won
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
We started off easy running uphill out of Leadville and onto the mining roads. I tucked in with Paul Koch (my former assistant XC coach and the men’s marathon champ the past two years) because I figured he knew what he was doing. After the half-marathoners split off it was some guy with a bunch of tatoos a ways out front, some other dude who sucked on the uphills, and me and Koch. Koch and I kept a steady pace through the initial steep sections to the first aid station. After that we started circumnavigating Ball (Bald?) Mountain and had the first real downhill where I realized I’d be able to outdistance Koch on the real downhills in the race. Climbing up the backside of Ball Mountain, Koch and I caught Tatoo Man, but Koch then dropped a couple of his gels and had to stop to pick them up.
I just stayed behind the tatooed fella because he seemed to be running a suitable pace and I was pretty sure Koch was going to catch back up with us any time. Well, we descended down into the mines, started the climb up Mosquito Pass and got quite a ways up it before Koch finally caught us. He immediately put a small gap on us but I never really felt like I lost contact. I dropped Tatoo Man maybe 5 minutes from the top and Koch was coming out of the summit aid station just as I was coming in--he had less than a minute on me.
I immediately began flying back down the pass mostly trying not to fall or crash into anyone, passed Koch well before the aid station at the bottom and then just tried to keep running strong. The rest of the race was a matter of just trying to survive on the significant amount of uphill that existed on the “downhill” half of the course. I couldn’t believe how slowly I felt I was running some of the uphill sections, but it must’ve been enough because I ended up finishing over 9 minutes ahead of Paul. I left the last aid station (3.9 miles to go) in 3:18 and knew that I’d have to really fly to get the course record, alas, I had apparently lost too much time on some of the uphills and ended up less than two minutes off of Paul DeWitt’s record with a final time of 3:41:04.

Things Done Right:
Lots of daily long trail runs in my training. My climbing is definitely improving as I expected Paul to put 5-10 minutes into me on the climb up to Mosquito Pass. As it was, it was less than a minute.

Wearing racing flats even though the course was rocky as hell. I always train in racing flats for all of my running, so it was the natural choice even though people were really surprised.

Things Done Wrong:
I need more sustained steep uphills in my training, such as more runs up El Diablo (the 666 trail to Jones Park).

I really need to look into using energy gels and gatorade in my training runs so that I can use them in long races such as this. I think I would’ve felt a lot better the second half of the race and maybe gotten the course record if I would’ve been confident enough to ingest some calories during the race (I only took water). I guess right now I’m just afraid it will upset my stomach, but not taking in any fuel in a race of this length is obviously just a huge disadvantage.

Any Other Stuff:
This course might be a, overall, tougher than Pikes Peak just because of the extensive uphill sections on the way back “down” the mountain. Leadville seems like a really cool town (great trails, mountains, etc.) but the mosquitos really suck. Even so, camping/sleeping without a tent the night before was fine.

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Tibor Kiss reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4:45
Results: 4:49:37
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Out and back course, 10,000 start, 13185 feet turning point, but lots of ups and downs in between. There is a 3 mile or so uphill on the downhill half, which is pretty tough, and something drastically different from what we are used to at the Pikes Peak Marathon.

Things Done Right:
Hydration and calorie intake. For the first time in any race I took a bottle with me. It really paid off. I had no pain after the race and was ready to run next day. I also started eating as soon as they had food at an aid station, which helped me avoiding a stomach upset that limited my fluid intake in races in the past. Finally, I did not overdress, which I was inclined to. I guess I was lucky that I got back before the thunderstorms hit.

Things Done Wrong:
There is a loop in the middle of the race course. I ran it significantly faster on the way out than on the way back. I guess that means I went out too fast.

Any Other Stuff:
Good aid stations although relatively far apart. The jeep road sometimes feels like a scree-field, and can be tough to run downhill. The web site could be better, some stuff is hard to find on it. Overall, good race.

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub-6 hours
Results: 5 hours 53 minutes
Website: www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
The Leadville Trail Marathon goes to the top of Mosquito Pass and back down.

Things Done Right:
After spending the night in the Mazda Motel, I was feeling pretty rough, so I drank two large coffees while washing down a caffiene pill or two. This helped to wake me up after a restful four hours of sleep. I stuck with Little Debbies and “ultra-crack” throughout the race. No sandwiches! I actually ran some of the downhill sections without much whining, which helped me break 6 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
I did enough wrong stuff at the Lake City 50 for many future races.

Any Other Stuff:
Cool race mementos at the finish!

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Ironman Couer d’Alene - Coeur d’Alene, ID - June 26, 2006

Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi run (140.6 mi total distance)
Goal: Finish (without drowning during the swim)
Results: Finished — 12:02 Total time, 4:40 Marathon
Website: http://ironmancda.com

General Summary:
Since this is a running club, I’ll focus primarily on the running portion. It was definitely the slowest marathon I’ve ever run (with the exception of Pikes Peak Marathon), but it was also the most gratifying. The organizers put on a great event — it seems almost Olympic in scale (complete with athletes’ village, huge dinners, and over 4000 volunteers for only 2400 racers).

Unfortunately, the area was hit with record heat during the race weekend, and most of us started the marathon with temps in the low to mid 90’s. Crowd support was unbelievable, as many of the homeowners along the race course had portable sprinklers running out in the street to cool us off. The course had great views of the lake, and it was mostly flat (two small hills, which felt like mountains near the end of the race). They had aid stations at every mile.

Things Done Right:
I set my watch to beep every five minutes to remind me to drink. This helped tremendously, because during the last half of the race, when I was beginning to fatigue, it kept me from getting dehyrdated. I also took in over 30 Power Gel packs w/ 4x the sodium and typically took them in every 20-30 minutes. This really helped to hold any cramping problems at bay.

Things Done Wrong:
I probably held back too much, but being my first event of this kind, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was hoping to come in under 12 hours and missed it by 2 minutes. I probably should have pushed harder.

Any Other Stuff:
I saw a lot of the runners puking their guts out near the beginning of the run. It was an amazing spectacle to witness people melting down like that.

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Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run - Squaw Valley to Auburn, CA - June 24-25, 2006

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: Finish
Results: Finished/ 26:22.:02
Website: http://WS100.com

General Summary:
The Western States 100 Endurance Run..the “Run”

I arrived by plane, train and automobile. Judy and Paul Dewitt and I carpooled to DIA, took the bus from the outside parking facility, rode the train to the gate and flew an Airbus directly into Sacramento, CA.

What hit us next as we met Paul Smith, my crew and pacer, was heat, heat and more heat!

We drove to Auburn to check out the finish line at the local high school. Finding the school was an adventure in itself and I thought I hope I do not have this much trouble finding it on Sunday. The temperature on the local bank read 101.

We continued on to the Olympic Village at Squaw Valley, close to Lake Tahoe and checked into the condo I rented within a minute of the starting line. It also turned out to be a perfect spot as the pre-race meetings were held directly outside the attached patio.

Smitty and I walked over to the village and checked out the starting area. I went back to the room and Smitty walked up the first 4 miles of the course to the top of the escarpment. He reported a good ¼ mile of snow at the top to traverse through on race morning. I’d find out Saturday morning that we would run in and out of snowfields all the way to Robinson Flat at mile 29.

Friday was the pre-race weigh-in and medical check. I’m always concerned about my blood pressure (white coat syndrome & hereditary hypertension). Vitals were good, 140 pounds, 122/80 BP and pulse of 50.

Prior to the mandatory meeting, Smitty and I drove over to Tahoe City to pick up some things at the Albertson’s and fill up on petro. We went down to the lake and enjoyed the scenery. I forgot how beautiful it is around the Lake, although I had been there in 1998 and 1978 and as a small boy in 1958, it just is beautiful.

We sat out on the patio for the pre-race meeting as the final instructions and introductions of all the top runners from last year were introduced.

I hit the bed about 8pm hoping to get 6 hours of good sleep. Turns out I slept to about 2 and finally got up at 3 for the 5am start. After I got ready and ate I walked over to check-in and pick up my race number. We also wore a chip in order for the updates to the web site as to “where is my runner” link.

The gun went off right at 5am. The first 3.5 — 4 miles is basically up, up and up. Not high, just to 8750 ft or so, but it really strung out the 398 starters. I walked the majority of it, but found a few places to run. Smitty was right, the top had a quarter mile of snow that was very difficult to run through, just slip and slide. Once to the top I found a nice downhill, but hit many short snowfields that many of us slid onto our bottoms.

We ran Duncan Canyon this year for the first time since the Star Fire destroyed the area back in 2000 or 2001. It still smelled like smoke and it looked like a war zone, completely destroyed. Volunteers had dynamited the standing trees and cut them up and this allowed the Forest Service to allow the run back in the canyon.

I arrived at Duncan Canyon aid station and ask who knew Keith Grimes and only a few wanted to admit it and told me per his instructions I was second woman. I wish! There were lots of outstanding ladies out a head of me.

After descending down the canyon, I came across the first of many streams and creeks. I would stop at everyone and pour the ice cold water all over my body to try to keep my body temperature down. It also felt so good.

The first chance to meet up with my crew was Robinson Flat at mile 29. Smitty and Judy D were there and Paul D had gone through earlier in 6th place. After changing socks, shoes and eating I was off to Miller’s Defeat aid station, were Arlene Bidwell was the aid station captain. I introduced myself and her husband was the “Bidwell” and he was working the table checking the runners out of the station, so I stopped and chatted a little with him.

The first major climb after the Escarpment was up to Devil’s Thumb in Deadwood Canyon at Mile 46. It was right at the time the heat of the day seemed hottest. I thought to myself how much it reminded me of the steep part of Section 16, however it just kept going on and on and on, never seeming to get to top out. I took some extra time at the aid station to refuel before heading out to El Dorado Canyon and Michigan Bluff.

El Dorado Canyon was another challenging climb, just as long as Deadwood, but not as steep. Once to Michigan Bluff at mile 55, I got a little testy with Smitty, but his support was so much appreciated. After changing socks, downing the last of my “green machine” drink and puking up some of the melon I had been eating and feeling so much better, I was off to Foresthill at mile 62. During this part of the run, I ran along with Matt from Auburn Running Company and he provided me some valuable trail information for the rest of the run.

At Foresthill arriving at around 8pm, Smitty met me again with another sock change, a Boost drink and I switched to Coke and grapes for nutrition. Everyone had said if you make it to Foresthill and feel good the rest is very run able and down to Ruchy Chuck Crossing at mile 78. There are a lot more climbs between Foresthill and the crossing then I expected, but I still felt pretty good.

I met Smitty on the far side of the river crossing just past midnight, as he was going to pace me in from there. We power walked and ran up the 2 miles to Green Gate and started the run to mile 85 station at Auburn Lakes. We were making some good time here, until I notice I had not seen a trail marker for some time and I asked Smitty if he had seen any. He said he could see some footprints, so we continued on to the top of the climb to find NOTHING! We’d been off trail according to the sign for about 2 miles, although running back down didn’t seem like 2 miles. We saw some headlamp lights to our right and thought we’d missed the trail that way, but they were the lamps of the Japanese runner and her pacer coming back to the main trail as they had gone the wrong way. The trail made hard right going up, with no glow stick and just one yellow streamer someone out of sight. DAMN. We probably lost 20-30 minutes, but at least had gotten back on trail.

At Brown’s Bar, the HASH aid station, I asked for a beer and they had one ready for me, although I declined, knowing there were a couple waiting for me at the finish line. On the way to Highway 49 station the sun was coming back up and we started to see the second sunrise of the run. We were running back and forth with a few other runners and there pacers and Smitty mentioned were had put some time on a few of them, but I said it was me against the finish line, not other runners. Later, after NO Hands Bridge, we had past a few runners and a couple passed us. I said to Smitty, I was tired of getting passed and we were going to pick up the pace running and power walking. I think just one younger runner went by at mile 98.9 and we actually ran the rest of the way in to the track at the high school. Hitting the track, I unbuckled my hydration pack so my CRUD shirt was visible to the crowd. I crossed the finish line with a big smile on my face and a sense of accomplishment !
that I finished strong and standing straight up.

Paul and I relaxed with a beer and walked over to shower at the gym. We were able to share some shade with some folks from southern California, and actually took over a couple of their chairs when they wandered off. The post-race breakfast just wasn’t very tasty, so as Paul D, Judy and I left for the airport, they offered to stop at In N Out Burger, my favorite burger joint in California, Arizona and Nevada. Oh, so good and Paul and Judy shared a burger and shake and I had a cheeseburger and chocolate shake and we shared some fries, that Paul D really seemed to enjoy!

Paul and I hobbled through the airport and ran into Smitty just before his flight took off. I think I was able to finally sleep for a few minutes on the flight to Denver and hobbled through the terminal in Denver, although Judy seemed to carry all the heavy baggage. Thanks Judy! We got back to the DeWitt’s after 8 and I was home by 9, what a very long, but rewarding day.

My feet were pretty beat up with blisters and damaged toenails, taking quite a few days to be able to walk normally, but the rest of my body felt pretty good by Tuesday.

Thanks to Paul Smith for putting up with me during a few moments and being my crew and pacer. Thanks to Judy and Paul DeWitt for sharing the trip with me.

My summer is now running free, but you never know were I might show up on the starting line.

See you on the trails.

Things Done Right:
Ran my own race, adjusted for the heat.

Things Done Wrong:
Try not getting lost, no need to run extra miles in a 100-miler

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Tour du Luc - Bucksport, Maine - June 24, 2006

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Sub 90 minutes and win age group
Results: 93:11, won age group

General Summary:
Temp’s in the 60’s and 70’s, raining and very humid. Typical small town New England race, well organized, tons of water on course. $10 entry included a “T".
Awards were an engraved chunk of local granit (this area is famous for this).

Things Done Right:
Not very much!

Things Done Wrong:
Raced Mt Washington the week before, legs pretty tired.

Any Other Stuff:
As is typical in this area, the course was tough. After about 600 yards down hill from the start, the course climbed for the next mile and a half. From then on there was NO flat sections, just rolling hills with the initial 600 yards to climb back up to the finish.

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5K Scholastic Challenge - Springfield, Illinois - June 24, 2006

Beverly Weaver reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: 31 minutes/place in age group
Results: 31:07/2nd in age group
Website: http://srrc.net

General Summary:
I was expecting a hot day, but it cooled off enough to be a good day to race (60’s with a little breeze). Flat, flat, flat course.

Things Done Right:
Even pace; each mile was just a little bit faster than the previous mile. Passed a lot of folks in the last mile or so.

Things Done Wrong:
Not used to trying to run these short, flat road races. I need to do more of them or just give them up. However, I am addicted to getting those Incline Club Sunday ‘stars’, so I thought I should find a race to run over the weekend.

Any Other Stuff:
All the race proceeds go to local schools for their running programs. All the awards, food, shirts, etc. are donated so that all monies are available for schools. (Good idea — sounds like the BTMR.)

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Estes Park Marathon - Estes Park, CO - June 18, 2006

Tony Krupicka reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub-3:00/win and get in a fun long run
Results: 2:45:02
Website: http://www.epmarathon.org

General Summary:
Ran with the lead runner for the first 11 or 12 miles or so...we were way ahead of everyone else. For some reason my body just really wanted to go around the 11-12 mile mark so I let it and began running 6-flat pace for the next 5 miles or so when I hit the next big climb (3 miles sustained climbing from 17-20 mile mark). That impromptu surge pretty much immediately dropped the runner I’d been sharing the lead with. After the 20 mile marker, the course was downhill for a mile, and then uphill until the 22 mile mark or so. From there it was a gradual downhill or flat all the way back to the finish at the high school track. I was happy enough to see the finish, but this was definitely the best I’ve felt in the last 10K of any of the marathons I’ve done. Guess I’m in better shape than I thought. Second place was 17 minutes back, and I broke the course record by over 2 minutes.

Things Done Right:
Decided to race for real after I realized my body was feeling pretty good. Negative split 1:23:29/1:21:23. Took water at every aid station from the beginning through 21 miles---even if I was only able to get a single oz. or so splashed in my mouth (and not up my nose or all over my chest) each time.

Hydrated pretty well the day before the race. Had a semi-psuedo-taper: only ran 13 miles two days before the race and only 10 miles the day before.

Things Done Wrong:
Well, if I was intending to run a PR (which I did do, but hadn’t intended) I probably wouldn’t have run 140 miles the week of the race. Even though I hadn’t gone in expecting to run 2:45, in retrospect I don’t wish that I had started any faster (I only negative split by 2 minutes).

Any Other Stuff:
This course is the highest paved marathon in the country. There are also two extended climbs that are not conducive to really rockin’ out a decent time...a 4 mile climb from the 2-6 mile point and a 3 mile climb from the 17-20 mile point.

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 4:44
Results: 4:34:44
Website: http://www.epmarathon.org/

General Summary:
Billed as “the highest paved marathon in the world and one of the most scenic.”

Things Done Right:
Conservative pace; managed minor injuries.

Things Done Wrong:
Insufficient sleep leading up to race.

Any Other Stuff:
Small race (probably less than 200 marathoners). Figure 8 race course; great scenery; aid stations every 2 miles.

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San Juan Solstice 50 - Lake City, CO - June 17, 2006

Andy Cullan reports:
Distance: 50
Goal: Finish
Results: Finished — 14:50ish
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/

General Summary:
Race is 50 miles through the San Juan Mountain Range, three major climbs, two from 9500’ or so to over 13000’ and a third from 10000’ to 11000’. Beautiful course, great views, awesome aid stations, friendly staff all wrapped up in a itty bitty mountain town.

Things Done Right:
Stayed well hydrated, didn’t push too hard — had a little IT Band problem going which made the downhill a bit hard, but this being my first journey over 31 miles, it may have helped me not go too hard.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have traded out socks earlier before I got a blister and should have used thicker socks for a spare pair.

Any Other Stuff:
What a great race to pick for a first 50 miler!!!

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 50 Miles
Goal: Stay On Course!
Results: Stayed On Course!
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/

General Summary:
San Juan was everything I expected having run it the year before — and more! I’m not sure if knowing what to expect is an advantage or a detriment. I laughed, I cried, I even gave birth... actually no — but I did get a Sonogram.

Everything was fine for the first half. Less snow this winter meant the many creek crossings weren’t as treacherous or as fast, but they were still as freezing cold! Ran Alpine Gulch and up above tree line with Judy DeWitt and Andy Cullen. Judy took off on the downhill into Williams — never saw her again (she had an amazing race). I gained on Andy, and didn’t see him again until later.

Just past the 1/2 way point above, past the Carson aid station, up above treeline, I started get really sharp lower back pains. With images of Keith Grimes going through near renal failure at Leadville, I increased my rate of hydrating — drinking probably faster than I should have. My hydration (2-20 oz. hand-held bottles) was gone and I still had about 2 miles to the next aid station. I wasn’t in panic mode — but close. By the time I made it to the next aid station, I couldn’t even talk. Sat in the aid station for a while getting re-hydrated. Andy caught up, so I took off again when I started to feel better, but the sharp back pain was still there.

I slogged through, finishing about 1 minute slower than my time in 2005, with the finishers from CRUD & CREW cheering me on. I looked like the Michelin Man, my hands and feet were so swollen. I went right over to the EMT and ambulance (didn’t even have a beer!!!). The EMT ran a couple of tests, hooked me up to an IV and the next thing I knew I was strapped to a gurney heading for the Emergency Clinic. I wanted the siren — but didn’t get it.

Long story short, even though I was drinking all day I hadn’t peed since before the start of the race. Once in the ER I was given 2 more IV bags of solution, and force fed water. Paul DeWitt was amazing, he arrived at the ER just after Carole (best support crew ever) and I, he came in to the examination room giving encouragement like; “I had 7 bags after my win at Leadville.” At one point, they thought it may be kidney stones, but all the tests proved negative. They did a Sonogram (“Better not find a fetus” — more encouragement from Paul... to which Carole said, “It’s not mine".) To make sure my bladder and kidneys were functioning — they were. Even had an EKG because my respiration rate was high and my blood pressure was elevated and wouldn’t come down. I kept telling them it was because I didn’t have a beer at the finish line! Finally after 3 hours in the ER I was able to pee in cup, more analysis, and then I and discharged. I have it on sound medical authority that BEER is a natural “diuretic.” They gave me a diuretic (in tablet form) to cleanse out my system — which really worked along with the beer I was finally able to drink — every hour on the hour all night long! The doctor sought me out Sunday at the awards ceremony to make sure I was doing OK — great medical team for such a small community.

So after all that here are my results:

San Juan 2005 14:31:22
San Juan 2006 14:32:36 (Unofficial)

Things Done Right:
The group I started in didn’t follow the leaders the wrong way down pavement from the Town Park, but made the right turn onto gravel to head up Engineers Pass.

Went out and maintained a sustainable pace.

Drop bag (fresh shoes and socks) at Carson.

Slapped on the sunscreen.

Sucked it up and finished.

Have a massage scheduled for tomorrow — Tuesday.

Things Done Wrong:
No sure on this one. I’m going to investigate this further. Did I hydrate too much — or not enough? Sodium Chloride pills... “mother’s little helpers” or should I have used a combination of sodium, plus magnesium, potassium?

Could have used a Camelback or additional hydration up along the Divide.

Worried Carole.

Any Other Stuff:
From the Web Site:

The San Juan Solstice 50 mile endurance run is a scenic and very difficult loop through the high San Juans. The run consists of five main sections: the climb up Alpine Gulch and down William’s Creek, the climb up to the old mining town of Carson, a long section along the Continental Divide, a descent to Slumgullion Pass, and a final hump up and over the Vicker’s Ranch plateau.

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Jon Teisher reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 13:30:47
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/

General Summary:
Tough mountain 50 miler through the continental divide.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t start out too quick, which left me something in the tank for the final hill.

Things Done Wrong:
Coulda used a couple of more long runs heading into this one.

Any Other Stuff:
Great course, if you’re into beating yourself up.

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Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 12:19
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com

General Summary:
Scenery was sublime. Weather terrific. Course brutal.

Things Done Right:
Stayed well hydrated. Didn’t bonk.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough training.

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: 10:30
Results: 10:19
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com

General Summary:
A 50 mile race in the San Juan mountains surrounding Lake City. Perfect running weather and a beautiful course. The volunteers and especially the aid station workers did a tremendous job and were very helpful.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy on the uphills and took in quite a bit of calories. I made sure that I still had energy for the final climb of the race at mile 40. A good portion of my training was powerhiking which really helps in a course like this. Did some altitude training, but not enough. Tapered the last two weeks prior to the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not get enough altitude training in and wish that I could have ran more at the higher altitudes.

Any Other Stuff:
The course spends about 1/4 of the distance above 12000 ft and 1/2 the distance above 11000 ft. There are three climbs and after the first two, the course stays above treeline for awhile. The second climb you feel like you may never see a downhill again :)

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish
Results: Matt finished the Leadville 100 faster
Website: www.lakecity50.com

General Summary:
The Lake City 50 is one tough SOB of a race that starts in Lake City and goes up in lots of very mountains, and through LOTS of streams. I really got my ass kicked.

Things Done Right:
nothing

Things Done Wrong:
didn’t get enough sleep, got lost getting to the race, had the worst PMS throughout the race, whined constantly, slid 50 feet down a snow bank and bounced off lots of rocks at the bottom, had a panic attack, wet myself, ( I came to apppreciate those endless stream crossings)scraped my elbows, knees, shins, and quads, got my feet and legs so wet and cold they burned, ate a sandwich that screwed up my stomach for nine miles causing me to bloat and look five months pregnant, barely made the cutoffs, cussed way too much, and finished with only seven minutes to spare. I think I need to go back and redeem myself on this one.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of pretty flowers.

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Mt Evans Ascent - Mt Evans highway, Colorado - June 17, 2006

Darrell Weaver reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: 2:30-3:00 hours
Results: 2:48
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevans/index.html

General Summary:
Race from Echo Lake (10,000 feet)to Mt Evans summit (parking lot 14,125 feet)on the paved highway. Race started at 8:00 Weather was good; a little cold and windy at times early on. Alittle downhill before Summit Lake around miles 8-9, but mostly an uphill grind, steeper in the first and last few miles.

Things Done Right:
1) Held back at the start rather than going hard and flaming out (I’d never done this race before, so I was cautious) Even effort (until I bonked)

2) Kept running in the last miles, even though it was steep and I was beat. I think at very high altitude it’s better to keep running, even at a shuffle, rather than walking. I tried walking a few steps and got very dizzy and slowed down, whereas I could maintain an endurable rhythm and slow but steady pace by running (if it can be called that). CFM!

Things Done Wrong:
I bonked in the last four miles and I think it was because I dehydrated. I relied only on the four aid stations for fluids and then only took a couple small swallows of electrolyte stuff. The stations were 3 miles apart and at the slow pace, 30+ minutes is too long to be dry. I guess I’ll never learn, since I’m always doing this. But next time, there’s hope.

Any Other Stuff:
If your big race goal is the ascent or marathon, I’m not sure this race is a good stepping-stone race, particularly if you try to really race it. I say this because it beat me up pretty good and it’s going to take a little time to get back in the training groove. But maybe this is just me; some other ICers who have run it may feel differently.

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Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: Sub — 2:15:00
Results: 2:24:13
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevans/index.html

General Summary:
14.5 mile road race from bottom of Hwy. 5 at an altitude of 10,600’ and climbing almost 4000 vertical feet. Few downhill and level areas. Billed as America’s Highest Road Race.

I ran a very good race up until about the 12th mile where I completely bonked. I found myself having to alternate walking and running from there to the finish. I ended up getting passed by about quite a few people during those last two miles. Instead of placing in the top 10, I finished 19th.

Not extremely bad for my first time but still very disappointing compared to what I should have run. However, I look forward to doing this race next year.

Fortunately, two guys that I ran with had excellent results, so two out of three ‘ain’t’ bad.

Things Done Right:
Began the race conservatively (about 9 minute pace) and held that pace throughout most of the race until about the 12th mile. Drank some water and even managed part of a Gu along the way.

I knew the entire route and have trained on the lower 8 miles and upper 4 miles so I also knew what to expect.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not sufficiently train for this race. I thought I had but it was evident that I did not have enough long runs or enough runs of beyond 2 hrs. This race was an excellent wake up call for my PP Ascent training. I will also get more altitude training in.

Any Other Stuff:
At the summit, a few feet away from the restrooms there was an entire family of mountain goats including a very young one scampering around. They allowed us to walk within a few feet without getting too skittish.

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Andy Kovats reports:
Distance: 14.5
Goal: low 2:20’s and around top 20
Results: 2:31:59 and 26th overall
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevansascent.html

General Summary:
The all-paved course starts at the Echo Lake Toll Gate at 10,600 feet and finishes 14.5 miles at the summit parking area. The 14256’ summit is another couple hundred yards of hiking and is worth the extra effort after claiming one’s gear bag. While most of the course is gradual uphill, there are downhill breaks starting at roughly 6 and 8 miles. Around 9 miles one leaves Summit Lake, the course steepens and most agree this is the toughest part. I would have expected higher turnout this year given all the people who were turned away from the Pikes Peak races, but it remained relatively low key with around 140 finishers this year. It was well organized with volunteer shuttles driving people from the summit to Summit Lake and school busses taking us the last stretch down to Echo Lake. The awards picnic started ahead of schedule and had plenty of good food including Subway sandwiches. The views of the Front Range and Gore Range are spectacular and due to the higher starting elevation and longer distance this course has much higher proportion above timberline than the PP Ascent.

Things Done Right:
Switched from steady run to hard run/brisk walk-recovery above last aid station which allowed me to catch 3 or 4 people before finish, taking partially full water bottle at start helped with hydration as cups at aid stations were small, also walked a few paces at each aid station to ensure I had breathing under control enough to drink

Things Done Wrong:
A nagging Achilles injury since May along with a respiratory infection has kept my quality training down along with my race motivation. Due to windy conditions I ran in long pants to keep the Achilles warm, and ran with standard heavy training shoes. Given the same conditions and a more healthy body I’d have gone in shorts and lighter shoes. Should have warmed up a bit more as I felt like I was in oxygen debt the first 2 miles even though I paced slow. Sleeping at altitude the night before would have also likely helped since the starting elevation of this race is so high. We were asked to turn in our gear bags 30 minutes before the start, which was a bit long to stand around in light racing dress. I might keep an extra set of expendable sweats near the start to keep warm in next time.<

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Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 14.5mi
Goal: Good training run. PR
Results: 2:06:36, 5th oa, 2nd master, PR
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevansascent.html

General Summary:
Rain and snow on the mountain Thursday and Friday. Saturday was crystal clear. It was very windy and cold at the start. Strong winds most of the way up. Surprisingly calm and pleasant at the top.

Things Done Right:
Started comfortably. I was in about 10th at 1 mile. Ran at marathon race effort until about mile 9. Passed a pack of three, to move into 5th, about 5.5mi. The top 4 places were too far ahead by then. Tried to pick it up for the last 5.5mi, the steepest part of the course. I was still tired from GoG, and 3 straight weeks of racing, and couldn’t get my leg turnover or HR up enough at the end. PRd by over 2 min, from my 1999 time.

Things Done Wrong:
Raced 3 weeks in a row. Only wrong if this was a target race. The races were good training for me, a good gauge to my fitness level, and what I need to work on.

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Valerie Deneau-Prothe reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: 3:05
Results: 3:04
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevansascent.html

General Summary:
Start at the toll booth near Echo Lake (10,000 feet)
end at the Mt Evans parking lot near the summit all on the toll road. Climb just over 4,000 feet. Race was very well run. Aid stations every 3 miles and very well stocked. Weather was great, compared to 2003 when a blizzard caused my only DNF. A bit cold and windy for the first 4-5 miles, but then it warmed up and the wind wasn’t too bad (relatively speaking).

Overall, had a fabulous race up until mile 10+. I was ahead of schedule and feeling great! Then I messed up. One, I really hadn’t done any long runs to
speak of prior to the race (are those things really necessary?) I paid dearly for that. Two, I failed to get enough water/electrolytes at the mile 9 aid station and ran out of water by mile 10. Due to the above combo my hips and calves started to ache and I slowed a little. John caught up with me in my car by mile 11, but I failed to stock the car with water (oh...that would have been a swell idea). However, it was nice to throw unneeded items at him as I trudged along (and he was a great sport about it! :). Two lovely angels on the side of the road saved me by giving me some of their water (thank you, whomever you two were!) I made it to the mile 12 aid station and repeated the same error (ARGH!) AGAIN, I ran out of water/electrolytes shortly past the aid station and just had to suck it up the last 1.5 mi. By now my hips and calves were really aching and it was difficult to run...I’m my own worst enemy....

I somehow managed to run the last 30 yards across the finish line and mentally felt great! I drank some water, hiked up to the summit then headed into Morrison for a lovely lunch with friends!

Things Done Right:
- Got in a high altitude hike 3 weeks before
- Got a lot of rest the 2 nights before
- Ran easy in the beginning
- Hydrated and fueled up early on
- Had a car following me for the last 4 miles
- Had adequate clothing for the race

Things Done Wrong:
- Biggest issue, didn’t have in the necessary long runs
- Didn’t do enough runs on pavement prior to race
- Didn’t hydrate properly at last 2 aid stations
- Didn’t put a diluted sports drink in the car

Any Other Stuff:
I really would impress upon anyone doing this race to do some long runs on pavement. In addition to the pain in my hips, ended up getting mild shin splints too.

Nice race to get in some great altitude early! :)

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Bighorn 50 miler - Dayton Wyoming - June 17, 2006

John Cassidy reports:
Distance: 52 Miles
Goal: Finish
Results: 47 Miles
Website: http://www.bighorntrailrun.com/

General Summary:
This race also has a 100M, 50K, and 30K races. The 50M sees the whole course because the 100m is an out and back. 50M starts at the high point turnaround at mile 48. Therefore 50M is really a 52M event. Cutt off where at 18M (6 minutes) 34M (10 minutes) 39M (14 minutes) 47M (missed by 30 minutes — I was done). From mile 21 to 42 I was in last place and a still make the cutoffs. I was within 100 yards of the next runner from 21 to 42 and we past others — they all got pulled at mile 34.

Things Done Right:
Signed up early — It fills fast. Had shoe change in first drop bag at mile 18. The first 18 miles are very wet downhill — This is a painfull downhill. Took ibuprofen and made it to mile 42 feeling good.

Things Done Wrong:
Tripped 4 times on the 18 miles downhill. Then twisted an ankle at mile 17. It took 1 hour to finish the last mile of first major downhill. Ran out of ibuprofen before the second major downhill miles 41 to 47. Fell behind the cutoff.

To train for this. Drive to the top of Pikes Peak and run downhill to hydro. Turnaround and do the Barr Camp race course. While doing this only use 1/2 the trail picking the worst side.

Any Other Stuff:
Wild and scenic. Yes wild because I saw two mouse. Plus a runner got bite by a rattlesnake a week before the race at mile 45. I would have been scenic if you took you eyes off the trail (very narrow and lots of loose rocks) Taking your eyes off the trail was at your peril. The barr trail between A-frame and Barr Camp would be considered a wide and little rocky.

Go to http://runtrails.net/2006/topics.htm for a runners journal of the race.

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Mt. Washington Road Race - New Hampshire - June 17, 2006

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 7.6 miles
Goal: 2 hrs. — 2:10 hrs., and try to win A.G.
Results: 1:57:21, second in A.G. (~ 15 in class)

General Summary:
Weather around 80 oF at 10 a.m. start, approximately 60 oF at top of mountain. No wind to speak of. Although a bit on the warm side, a good day to run this race.
Felt good all the way up, and thought I would have a shot at the age group record, and an age group win. Was close to the record, but was in second place to a great run by a fellow who did set a new age group record. Times seemed to be a bit slow this year, probably due to the temperatures.

Things Done Right:
Got to New England five days prior to race.
Tapered for two weeks, and didn’t run for two days before the race (need BIG taper these days).
Left the family in Maine and went to the race alone.
Was really careful about eating right leading up to the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Breaking right big toe a month prior to the race didn’t help, but the eliptical trainer is a viable alternative for intervals.

Any Other Stuff:
In the 20 or so years since I last ran this race, I had forgotten just how persistantly it climbs at nearly 12% grade. There is only a couple of short flat sections near the summit, by which time I was too tired to really take advantage of! Plenty of water stations to drink and dunk, made the run comfortable.

A down side to NH at this time of the year is that it co-incides with “The NH Motorcycle Week.” Motorcycles everywhere, no kidding, everywhere and all over the road. My ride down literally had to swerve violently twice to miss ‘bikes coming up the mountain, on the wrong side of the road! ‘Bikers die every year there!

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Matt Von Thun reports:
Distance: 7.6mi
Goal: 1:11
Results: 1:17
Website: http://www.mountwashingtonroadrace.com

General Summary:
This race starts at about 1000 ft. elevation and in 7.6 miles climbs to about 6000 ft. elevation at an average grade of 11.5%. The summit of Mt. Washington is reputed to have the worst weather in the nation including the world’s highest recorded wind speeed (greater than 200mph!). Our race started at 10 am. The temperatures at the base had climbed to about 80 degrees and the average humidity was 66%. The summit temperatures were in the 50’s when I finished, but went on to a record breaking 69 degrees. This made for challenging conditions for cool/dry weather runners like me. I struggled through the first 5 miles of the race, but started feeling better the last mile and a half. However, too much damage was done to make up for the lost time.

Things Done Right:
Tapered for the race. Did not start out too fast. Was well hydrated before the race. Drank water at each aid station.

Things Done Wrong:
I had not done enough to acclimitize for the heat and humidity.

Any Other Stuff:
This race served as the U.S. Mountain running championships, and the top three male runners were all from the East coast. It is an interesting side note that this is the first time in nine years that the winner came from the east coast, much less the top three runners.

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Vail 10k at 8000 ft - Vail, CO - June 11, 2006

Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: top 20 overall top 5 age under 53 min
Results: 26 overall 6 age 55m 27s

General Summary:
nice course, what was marked anyway, lots of steep uphill and technical singletrack.

Things Done Right:
Felt strong on the uphill and passed more people than I ever have on the technical downhill sections, did not go out too hard at the beginning, was well hydrated and rested for the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I personally did nothing wrong but this race was an absolute joke. After the first part of the race was very well marked the last section was not marked at all, leaving a lot of runners guessing their way down. Which might explain why I saw at least 5 different runners on differnt routes. People were cutting switchbacks and running wherever they pleased. At the end spectators were talking about how they saw the lead runners all finishing from different directions. This might explain why the results page shows 11 runners all with the time of 52m 00s. I was running within about 50-100 yards of Anita Ortiz for almost the entire run, and at the very end started to follow her down to the finish line at one of the many unmarked trail intersections, when a VRD person told me I had to run back up the ski run to hit the “official finish” during my 1/8 mile sprint straight up hill I watched as I dropped 7 places in the race. To really put this absolute disorganization in perspective let me give the best example: I was leading a group of 4 people on the trail when we came to an intersection of about 6 trails, one of which we had run up on. As we neared this junction a volunteer from Vail was on his cell phone chatting away moving the arrow signs to point the right direction down, nice time to do it after 15 or so racers had already come thru there. He would not pause his converstion to tell us which way to go as we looked around completely confused, finally we asked him and he said “ go left.” Well, there were 2 trails to the left so he watched as I started downhill and another runner headed up hill. He didn’t say which way was right until the other runner yelled at him “do we go up or down?” to which he responded “oh downhill.” I have gotten lost before on a race but never to this extreme- these results are not close to being right, and VRD should hang their heads in shame for putting on such a horribly organized race.

Any Other Stuff:
Do not support VRD trail runs until they learn to do them correctly.

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Garden of the Gods 10 Mile - Colorado Springs, CO - June 11, 2006

Beverly Weaver reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1) Finish 2) Break 2 hours 3)Place in my age group
Results: 1:57:10
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Reasonable weather, but all of the same hills as in previous years...
Managed to come in before 2 hours and win first in th 60-64 age group.

Things Done Right:
Trained with Incline Club, paced myself at the start.

Things Done Wrong:
Still need to drop those extra pounds. Carrying them up each hill and dragging them back down the other side is tiring.

Any Other Stuff:
All the fast women between 60 and 64 stayed home this year, which allowed me to come in first in my age group. So, being 60 has some advantages, after all...

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Hank Carey reports:
Distance: 10-M
Goal: 75 mins
Results: 77+ mins
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Race day conditions were ideal: Temps in the 60’s warming to the high 70’s with just enough wind to cool things off. Conditions don’t get any better. Matt Carpenter was this years’ official starter. We were disappointed that he didn’t entertain us with his musical stylings while he had the microphone at the starting line.

Things Done Right:
1. Restrained the adrenaline through the first 3 miles to maintain target pace.
2. Finished the last 3 miles strong with a good finishing kick and 7 or 8 roadkills in the last mile.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not manage the middle third of the race well (downhill in to the trading post and back out), concerned that I would run out off gas for the last two ‘big’ hills. Probably needed more i) hill intervals and ii) long runs/base mileage earlier in the season. Not to omit that I missed my traditional pre-race bagel and PB.

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Derek Engard reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:10
Results: 1:09:32

General Summary:
Awesome race!

Things Done Right:
Held my pace even with those tough hills.

Things Done Wrong:
Got a side cramp around mile 8. Not sure why, maybe pre-race meal?

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Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 1:05:00 or less
Results: 1:06:26

General Summary:
The 30th annual Garden of the Gods 10 mile. I enjoyed the race very much. It had constant challenges with each passing mile and is a race that you have to gauge correctly or you will find yourself in trouble. I caught many runners in later miles that apparently went out too hard in the beginning and paid for it toward the end.

Things Done Right:
Did not go out too hard in the first two miles. I also hydrated several times since it started to get slightly warm as the race wore on.

Things Done Wrong:
Underestimated this great race. I misinterpeted the profile and figured on shorter but steeper hills.

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Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 10m
Goal: none
Results: 1:07

General Summary:
Nice day for a fun run.

Things Done Right:
Ran within myself.

Things Done Wrong:
Daydreamed a little too much during mile 8. Lost some time.

Any Other Stuff:
First time I’ve run this race. Challenging course. Never a dull moment.

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Trish McCormick reports:
Distance: 10
Goal: 11 minute miles
Results: 12.234

General Summary:
It was fun and a challenge for me. Not very fond of pavement or running down hills.

Things Done Right:
Trained. Pretty good at pacing.

Things Done Wrong:
Stopping too long for water at every aid station, should just take a camelback and not stop.
More training.

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Andy Dillon reports:
Distance: 10M
Goal: 1:17
Results: 1:21
Website: http://

General Summary:
One of my favorite races — always fun to take part.

Things Done Right:
Lots of good distance running throughout the year — felt strong throughout.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough speedwork this year. I felt strong but was 20 seconds per mile slower than last year.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of fun as always — nice to see lots of IC’ers out there. Great volunteers also.

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Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 10mi
Goal: Good training run. Test fitness. 1st master. Place well for Triple Crown. Age group record.
Results: 15th oa. 2nd master. 63:48, 2:26 off age grp record. Won’t know about TC series place until Roundup
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/

General Summary:

Things Done Right:
Ran smart. I tried to, and think I mostly ran an even effort — at LT through about 7mi, then push harder the last 3mi. That means I was passed going uphill, then passed back going down. It feels strange to be passed on hills, when I’m primarily a trail/mountain runner. My theory is that I ran a more even effort, not pushing above LT on the uphills, while others tend to work harder on those hills. I think that, and being able to run downhill efficiently, allows me to compete with fitter runners.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t eat enough at the finish.

Any Other Stuff:
Learned that I need to work more on my LT.

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Michael Hartley reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 79
Results: 82

General Summary:
Awesome day for a race. The guy who started the race looked familiar:) Great Run!

Things Done Right:
Hydrated, positive, ready to run...

Things Done Wrong:
front five were about 30 seconds faster finish

Any Other Stuff:
Good job to all and to all keep runnin’...and bid high for those autographed snapshots or mags with local super runners smilin’...

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James Dikes reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 1:32:00
Results: 1:35:12
Website: http://www.gardentenmile.com

General Summary:
The hills were grueling but it was a nice day and I beat my old time in 2003 by almost 5 minutes!

Things Done Right:
Drank a lot of water the night before.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t clarify the race time with my buddy. He was late and as a result wasn’t allowed to run.

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Marisa McMillen reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Get in shape
Results: 1:43:55
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/race_results/2006_gog_10m_by_age.htm

General Summary:
Slow but fun

Things Done Right:
Enjoyed it

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train enough

Any Other Stuff:
Bravo to the blind woman who ran this!

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Andy Subudhi reports:
Distance: 10 M
Goal: work hard up the hills
Results: 1:04:30

General Summary:
Good run, great people.

Things Done Right:
Signed up!

Things Done Wrong:
Ran a bit too conservatively downhill.

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 10 mile
Goal: 1hr 15min
Results: 1hr 19min

General Summary:
Beautiful day for a run! Felt really strong through the entire run...oouuchh how roads hurt!!

Things Done Right:
Kept strong, and felt great.

Things Done Wrong:
Ate too late the night before....:)

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Dave Kinton reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 65 minutes
Results: 69:56

General Summary:
Great race, realized my goal wasn’t quite possible after the first big hill.

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated

Things Done Wrong:
Shoe came untied.

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Cereta Grimes reports:
Distance: 10miles
Goal: Finish (ok, maybe 1:40)
Results: 1:41:36

General Summary:
I went into this race as a training run. I did have a goal time, but that was a guesstimate!

Things Done Right:
Went out steady and kept an even pace. When I got a tired, I’d power hike the hills, run the down & flats.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran under an assumed “alias.” :)

Any Other Stuff:
I did the 5miler in early May — and was good to know a bit of the course beforehand. I’ve not done much training in the GOG — road wise. Trails are great!
Weather was cool and perfect!! :)

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Dennis W Murphy reports:
Distance: 10 Mile
Goal: Under two hours
Results: 2:10:16

General Summary:
Beautiful area to run. However I had problems I have not encountered before — Age must be catching up with me.

Things Done Right:
Run at a pace that felt comfortable (most of the way)

Things Done Wrong:
Must not have hydrated enough or too much water. Calves cramped at the eighth mile mark.

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10k Run For the Heart - Newport News, VA - June 10, 2006

Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: <45 min
Results: 43.15
Website: http://www.peninsulatrackclub.com/

General Summary:
A 10k race mostly on trails in beautiful Newport News Park. The race is organized by Peninsula Track Club in Newport News, Virginia. I managed to find this race as I was travelling to the area for a wedding. I was really looking forward to a race at sealevel. The race was early enough in the day for the temperature to still be reasonable low and the humidity was not too bad.

Things Done Right:
Paced myself at the start and did not get totally pulled in to the adrenaline frenzy. Quite a few people were doing 6 min/miles at first and seemed to have ruined their race very fast as they were breathing heavy within the first mile when I passed them. :) I brought my own bottle and therefore I could pass a couple of people as they had to slow down at the aid stations to drink.

Things Done Wrong:
Being on the road and celebrating a wedding made it hard to eat right and get enough sleep the night before.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was flat and on gravel/packed dirt through the woods of the park. The course also went over two long footbridges over a little lake. It was a beautiful landscape.

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North Olympic Discovery Marathon - Port Angeles, WA - June 10, 2006

Linda K. Ambard reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: 4:00
Results: 4:13
Website: http://www.nodm.com

General Summary:
I can’t say enough good things about this race. The race is run mostly on the Olympic Discovery Trail and is fairly flat and fast. The weather is usually between 54-70 degrees (ideal for this runner). The run is well supported.

Things Done Right:
I trained well and had eaten a good dinner and breakfast the day of the race. I stayed hydrated and I kept my blood sugar up. I went out conservatively and maintained a great pace until the hills at the 17 mile mark.

Things Done Wrong:
Well, we flew in the day before and then drove for a few hours to get to Port Angeles. I was running extremely well until the 22 mile (3:45 pace), but then I cramped up so severely that I struggled to stay on my feet. I am still having cramping issues. I am open to suggestions. Portland here I come!

Any Other Stuff:
This race is right across the water from Victoria. We are going next year and taking a vacation at the same time!

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4th Annual Casper Marathon - Casper, Wyoming - June 4, 2006

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 4:30
Results: 4:11:03
Website: http://www.runwyoming.com/

General Summary:
Road race marathon predominantly along the North Platte River.

Things Done Right:
Adequately rested; fueled; conservative, even paced run; managed heat and conditions well

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe underestimated potential; still had plenty left at the end ... not necessarily bad ... beats pooping out early!

Any Other Stuff:
Small race (less than 150 marathoners); few spectators; well administered; sufficient aid stations.

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Steamboat Half Marathon - Steamboat Springs Colorado - June 4, 2006

Cathy Dilts reports:
Distance: half marathon
Goal: finish and have fun
Results: finished in better time and shape than we expected

General Summary:
The morning started out chilly. There were hundreds of runners — most much more serious than us. We were happy to see dozens of walkers. We had a runner in the marathon, two in the half marathon, and two in the 10K — it was great the races were all on the same day — nice setup for friends and family to participate at their skill levels.

Things Done Right:
Reasonably well prepared with our training — and reasonable expectations for our skill level. We intended to walk the entire half marathon, but discovered we felt good enough to run part of the distance.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have eaten more for breakfast — the Gatorade and honey stingers were just enough to sustain life. Did not know that pavement is notorious for causing blisters.

Any Other Stuff:
I am encouraged that friends and family can participate in the races, even at a walk. It was nice to receive encouragement, being at the end of a long line of runners. Some folks have injuries or illnesses, or are just plain old and out of shape, and these events are great motivation to get up off the sofa. My husband and I started attending events to support friends, but are now excited to be participating.

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Steamboat Springs Marathon - Steamboat Springs - June 3, 2006

Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: To run my first marathon in 2+ years strong
Results: 4:00:14 which was alright with me
Website: http://www.boulderroadrunners.org/results/index.html

General Summary:
I was just hoping for a strong effort on this race because I knew I hadn’t trained hard enough to do as well as I could. A big part of this was to try to get over the mental block I have had with running the last couple months. My head on every run has told me that I can’t, and I was beginning to believe it was time to do something else besides run because I was starting to feel like every run was a lesson in suffering. The marathon was good because I actually was able to turn my head off and put in a strong effort and break through that mental barrier.

Things Done Right:
I ate light the day before the race to avoid stomach issues. I was rested. I gelled every hour on the course. Pushed myself hard to run as strong as I could.

Things Done Wrong:
I did not train well for this run. I didn’t do any speedwork, my long runs were very slow, and I ran a 50 mile race that left me so beat up I only ran 6-7 times in the month leading up to the race.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a beautiful road course where they drive you out 26.2 miles and you run back to town. The first half you lose about 2000 ft then it rolls after that. Great weather (a little warm) this year.

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Kerry Page reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:30 and to finish in the top 10 women
Results: 3:31 and 2nd place female

General Summary:
This course is all on a paved road running into downtown Steamboat Springs. It is very scenic and has a few hills, but the course is mostly downhill. It has a nice small town feel and is not overly crowded. They bus you out to the start and they have plenty of porta-potties with little or no lines. BYOB (bring your own breakfast) because there is a little wait, about 45 min to an hour before the start. The start was cool but clear, and the finish was pretty hot in the upper 70’s to low 80’s.

Things Done Right:
Besides taking good vitamins and eating much more healthy, I used a 12 week training program that I pulled off of Runner’s World web site that went by a % of your max miles per week (my max is 50 miles a week-I’m a wimp). I liked it because it was very flexible and just required that you do 2 hard workouts-the long run and the speed- and then you could put in the rest of the miles any way you want. My long runs included a buildup to 20, 23, and back to 18 miles and a 2 week taper. I ate, hydrated, and slept really well the day before the race. I didn’t put any pressure on myself as far as goals- until mile 13; then I decided what I wanted to shoot for. I totally enjoyed the views. I went out very consistent and conservative despite the down hills. Most of my mile splits throughout the entire marathon were 7:45-8:00. My half marathon split was 1 hour 42 min.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t do any speedwork on the track. My training program had me doing “speed” workouts in longer distances- more like tempo runs. So I attempted to do them on the easy trails like Monument Valley, but it never failed that I would run into someone I know and I’d stop to talk, or one weekend I got caught in a “walk” for something or another and got crowded off the trail. I don’t think I really ever did a speed/tempo workout at 100% effort.
My biggest mistake by far was not having a pint of Haagan Daas Mint Chocolate Chip ice cream in the freezer when I got back home.

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Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run - Orem Utah - June 3, 2006

Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run - Orem Utah - June 3, 2006
Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: set a PR
Results: did. 13 hours 29 minutes
Website: http://squawpeak50.com

General Summary:
Once again, RD John Bozung did a marvelous job organizing one of the most beautiful and toughest 50 mile races in the country. This year there was only about a mile of snow, compared to last years 10, so I didn’t have to tie a trash bag around my butt like last year to get down the avalance fields.

Things Done Right:
Ate lots of Little Debbies, and took my secret combination of caffiene supplements, (“ultra-crack”) and had fun. Went in with a relaxed attitude, since I race a 52 mile race less than a week ago.

Things Done Wrong:
Wasn’t recovered from the Rocky Mountain Double marathon — Duh!<

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Balarat Trail Run - Jamestown - June 3, 2006

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: ~6mi
Goal: Good training run. Possibly win.
Results: Bad day. Faded to about 8th.
Website: http://balarat.dpsk12.org/

General Summary:
I planned to do the Teva 10k, but decided on this race because of the drive and registration hassle at Vail. A first time race, with a fun, technical course.

Uphill start. I went out comfortably. About a mile in, I easily cruised past people, into 2nd, on a downhill. When we turned back up, I kept the effort in check (at least I thought), and let the leader build a small gap. I figured I would catch him on the downhills. I got passed by one on the climb. When we hit the next downhill, I couldn’t pick it up. When I got passed a couple of times on descents, I gave up competing and just did my own thing.

Things Done Right:
Start out comfortably, but maybe not enough. Didn’t try to hurt myself when I realized that I wasn’t having a good day. I’m doing GoG in a week.

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe I started too fast, or passed too early in the heat.

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Rocky Mountain Double Marathon - Medicine Bow National Forest - May 28, 2006

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 52.4 miles
Goal: under 10 hours
Results: 9:57:09 first place female overall

General Summary:
The Rocky Mountain Double Marathon was a double out and back course, where the race motto is “ where the race director promises nothing, and he delivers..” It was really hard going back out for the second marathon. But you got a nice buckle for your efforts. There were not a lot of runners, and I ended up running about 30 miles alone.

Things Done Right:
Kept calories up, and stayed hydrated. Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme Pies worked wonders once again! Decided to actually compete once I passed the second place woman. I kept looking back to see if she or anyone else was gaining on me, but as it turned out, I had gained nearly 20 minutes on the nearest woman. I didn’t realize I was in first woman until the last 12 miles. The second I crossed the finish line the sky opened up and there was a good storm. I’m not used to being that lucky in a race.

Things Done Wrong:
I should have quit yacking with my friends early on, and pushed harder, but I was having too much fun, and enjoying the beautiful course.

Any Other Stuff:
There were several annoying ATV riders kicking up dust throughout the race, riding in a reckless manner. I fantasized about them, ( the bikes) being crushed and melted. Also, there was over 20 miles of pavement for the double marathoners, which got kind of old, but overall it was a very good race, and the RD was really nice.

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NipMuck Trail Marathon - Connecticut - May 28, 2006

Karen Smidt reports:
Distance: 27 or so miles
Goal: 4:30
Results: 5:01
Website: http://www.marathonguide.com/sites/nipmucktrail/

General Summary:
Double loop out and back race on a densely forested single track trail made up of unforgiving roots and metamorphic rock. Elevation gain of about 2,800 feet but forgiving considering the low altitude.

Things Done Right:
I didn’t get upset about getting stranded on my way out to White Plains, New York where I needed to pick up my rental car. I flew American Airlines and got stuck for 20 hours in the Chicago O’Hare Airport, so I had to sleep on the floor with no blanket. Not a great start to a running trip, but I kept a positive attitude. After all, I don’t get to fly out to many trail races, so a little uncomfortable delay wasn’t going to ruin it for me!

For the race I took it super easy on the first loop (12 miles) and stayed hydrated. I was well prepared for the race--lots of 3-4 hour trail runs leading up to this training run.

Things Done Wrong:
I drank the “NipMuck Brew” which turned out to be some kind of Gu Drink. Even though I use Gu Gel, it was not very smart of me to use something I was not accustomed to. I ended up cramping so badly, I had to slow to a walk after 18 miles. I was in third place at the 19 mile mark and lost 4 places over the remaining 8 miles.

I was also not prepared for the roots and rocks, which really bruised my feet. I kicked so many rocks that my toes were a bloody mess midway through the race. I should have worn heavier trail shoes.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a very low key event. Top male & female awards consist of a freshly baked pie. No age division awards are announced, but you do get to pick up your “award” if you earned one--it’s on the honor system. The award is a cut section of a tree painted with the official blue spot that marks the NipMuck Trail (by the time you are finished with the race, you will have memorized the exact shade of that blue spot since it was your only tie to civilization throughout the race).

Race support consists of bringing your own gallon jug of water to the start and reporting your license plate number on your entry form. That way they know what runner is lost when they see a car still parked on the side of the road as they pack up and leave for the day.

The trail cuts across 3 major roadways (with maniac drivers), so runners are expected to stop and look both ways before crossing (no race officials were present at any of the roads).

The race director has a strange sense of humor. On top of using the race web site to announce tongue-in-cheek warnings, he also uses the race course to display his humor. On my way to the start I ran into a hand painted sign that announced, “Big Girly Man Race This Way!” The port-o-potty was completely covered in leaves that had been duct taped to the outside. Inside was a vase of long-stemmed roses and random messages were written on the floor. He will not start the race until 100% of the participants are lined up and ready to hear the race directions, which consist of a audio taping of an inbred lug (his words) asking stupid questions about the course. Throughout the directions, he wears a hula skirt made up of hundreds of Gu packets pinned to a belt.

If you are looking for an eccentric trail race and want to experience the beauty of the east coast, this is the race for you.

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Georgetown Mining Days Burro Race - Georgetown - May 27, 2006

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 8-9 mi
Goal: Have fun. Not get hurt.
Results: Had fun. Didn’t get hurt. Made friends with an ass.
Website: http://www.packburroracing.com/

General Summary:
Burro racing is just silly. That’s why I had to try it. A friend lent me one of his extra burros. He gave me some instruction on how to run and talk to the burro. I brushed him and let him sniff me, and we became friends.

The race started, and I held him back. I wanted to get a feel before I’d think about racing. Quickly, I realized that without training with the animal, he had a lot more say in how we would run than I did. I ended up with the second pack. A couple of times, I’d make a good pass, we’d start moving good, and I’d think that we could close on the leaders. Silly me. He’d stop and wonder where his buddies were, or try to pull me to the side so he could eat some grass.

The finish was either a comedy of errors, or very frustrating. Four of us were struggling with our asses. Each time one of us would get to the front, our burros would stop and wait for the others to pass. It might have very vaguely resembled a bicycle peloton. It took us about 7 minutes to get out of town to the trail; close to 20 to get back. I literally pushed my burro across the line to nose out my friend.

Things Done Right:
Had fun. Didn’t get kicked or dragged off the trail.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train with the burro, but I was just there for the experience.

Any Other Stuff:
There are a couple of other beginner races: 6/24 in Cripple Creek; 7/23 in Idaho Springs. You can arrange to rent/borrow a burro in advance. The “Triple Crown” is in late July and Aug, and includes the 30 mi race from Fairplay, to Mosquito Pass, and back.

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1st Annual Post-News Colorado Colfax Marathon - Denver - May 21, 2006

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Under 5:00 / survive
Results: 4:44:14
Website: http://www.coloradocolfaxmarathon.com/

General Summary:
Inaugural race; course was almost entirely on Colfax Avenue in Denver; running east to west with a net elevation gain of less than 300 feet.

Things Done Right:
Relaxed; conservative pace; adequately predicted physical conditioning and allowed for warmer than normal weather; visited with friends and assisted first-timers from training group.

Things Done Wrong:
Inadequate preparation — training, nutrition, rest, mental, and sleep.

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Journeys Marathon - Eagle River, Wisconsin - May 13, 2006

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:10
Results: 3:05
Website: http://journeysmarathon.com/

General Summary:
Northern Wisconsin in mid-May would normally be an optimum time to visit. Spring has begun, but the bugs haven’t emerged from their winter incubation. This year, however, we were greeted with snow, rain, and wind upon our arrival on Thursday, May 11th. It stayed cold enough that the snow didn’t melt until Friday afternoon, when the rain began to taper off. By race start, Saturday morning at 8 A.M. the rain had slowed to an intermittent drizzle, and the wind was a manageable 10 MPH.

We boarded buses in Eagle River at 7 A.M. and headed out to the north and west, out into the “headwaters” lake country for the race start on this scenic point-to-point course.

I wore an cotton long sleeve shirt over my singlet from the marathon in Maryland that I dropped out of last February due to extreme cold. When the truck carrying our “drop bags” passed us a couple miles into the race I balled it up and hurled it into the back of the truck as it raced past. Though I had been ready to give it up as a throwaway shirt, like a bad penny it was there for me at the end of the race.

I concentrated on starting off slowly, managing to hold back to a 6:54 first mile. As it turned out, if I had maintained that pace I could have won the race. Finding myself running alone in 4th place I quicked my pace to catch up with the three front runners by mile three. We ran together through about 11 miles when we started to break up.

By mile 8 I was a little alarmed to already feel the result of the relentless rolling hills in my calves. Finally by mile 21 I lost power and my pace dropped off precipitously to the mid-7’s and a couple of miles over 8 minutes.

Things Done Right:
Ran easy pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough road training. The pavement took its toll.

Any Other Stuff:
Journeys Marathon is a great destination marathon. The pasta feed and race logistics were well organized.

The northern Wisconsin lake country is spectacular. A set of 28 lakes connected by narrow waterways looked like it could make a great 2 to 3-day canoe trip.

If you are collecting state high points, the high points of Wisconsin as well as Michigan are both in striking distance. We made it up Timm’s Hill, the high point of Wisconsin, but were stopped short of Michigan’s high point on the UP by a washed out road.

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Rebekka Hannula reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi
Goal: to finish
Results: 4:22
Website: http://journeysmarathon.com

General Summary:
I highly recommend this race. Good organization. Great course.

Things Done Right:
This was my first really long run since my knee stopped hurting. So this was my way of testing the water. My knee came through with flying colors.

Things Done Wrong:
I did not have time to train. Wore shoes I have never worn on a long run.:-)

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Jemez 50km - Los Alamos, New Mexico - May 13, 2006

Jemez 50km - Los Alamos, New Mexico - May 13, 2006
Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km (actually was 33+ miles)
Goal: used it was a training run
Results: glad I didn’t sign up for the 50miler!
Website: http://highaltitudeathletics.org

General Summary:
When the course profile of any race looks like a cave full of stalactites, you know it’s going to be tough. And this race was tough, especially after running Collegiate Peaks 50 miler the weekend before. 7000+feet of climbing at high altitudes and rocky, treacherous trails made for a long day.

Things Done Right:
Finished. Last, (in the women's). Finished despite wanting to quit for pretty much the whole race.

Things Done Wrong:
Got pretty depressed and negative during miles 11 and 21.

Any Other Stuff:
Along with climbs that matched the difficulty of Leadville’s Hope Pass and Wasatch’s Chin Scraper, there were lots of fallen trees to bound over, or in my case, flounder over, due to a wind storm earleri in the week. Also the burnt forest caused by the forest service several years earlier for the first 8 miles was pretty depressing, but making a comeback.

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Bloomsday 12K - Spokane, WA - May 7, 2006

Dennis W Murphy reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1:22
Results: 1:25:51
Website: http://bloomsday.org

General Summary:
A fun race for walkers to elites. This year “Over 40,000 runners, joggers and walkers finished the 30th running of the Lilac Bloomsday Run, which has now recorded close to 1.2 million finishers” was the world's largest chipped timed race (everyone gets a chip).

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well on Saturday and did an easy 3 miles on Friday.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not have warm enough clothes. Never really got loose. Had assumed it was going to be warmer.

Any Other Stuff:
Fisrt 1.5 miles and last 1.5 miles are flat. The middle 4.5 are mildly up and down (max -15.3% and +6.5%). The signature “Doomsday Hill” is about 3/4 mile, 145 foot gain (about 6.5%).

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The Flying Pig Marathon - Cincinatti, Ohio - May 7, 2006

Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 26.2miles
Goal: 3:50:00 to qualify for Boston
Results: 3:47:42
Website: http://www.flyingpigmarathon.com

General Summary:
Road race thru the streets of Cincinatti, cross several bridges to and from Covington, Kentucky. Thru neighborhoods and along the Ohio river. Voted one of the top 10 most fun marathons by Runners World. It was the most fun I have ever had at a race. Great crowd support, volunteers, and a huge expo.

Things Done Right:
Everything. Good taper, well hydrated, pre-race meal. Rested and relaxed. Did not go out too fast(mistake I have made before)Ran with a pace group provided by the marathon, fought the urge to go any faster even though I felt good. Sea level and great race temps, overcast and mid 50’s. Dressed properly. Held pace till mile 24 then gave it all I had left to be sure I got in under 3:50.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing

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Colorado Marathon - Fort Collins, CO - May, 7 2006

Dave Kinton reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Under 3:15
Results: 3:07
Website: http://www.ftcollinsmarathon.com/

General Summary:
This was my first Marathon ever and while I’m still very sore it was a good experience. This is one of the most beautiful race courses I have ever seen and a fun race in general.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t expect too much, found another guy my same speed and kept pace together for miles 3 — 22. Kept hydrated reasonably well.

Things Done Wrong:
Training was lacking. I BONKED big time at mile 23.

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Mike Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi
Goal: Run a reasonably fast training run
Results: 3:29
Website: http://ftcollinsmarathon.com

General Summary:
This race is the opposite of an Incline Club run. It’s mostly downhill to flat, and it’s paved — not my ideal course, but beautiful nonetheless. A friend of mine was doing it as his first marathon, so on Wednesday before the race, I decided to join him and use it as a training run. My friend, Steve Abeyta, finished in 3:18 and qualified for Boston.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well, took in plenty of calories, and stayed positive through the whole run.

Things Done Wrong:
As usual, I took off too fast and my legs were pretty fried by mile 15. Also, the 2AM wake-up call really sucked.

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Collegiate Peaks Trail Run — 50 Miles - Buena Vista, Colorado - May 6, 2006

Jon Teisher reports:
Distance: 50 miler
Goal: Finish
Results: 9:54:16
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
Collegiate Peaks 50 miler. Tough course, outstanding views of several ivy league 14ers (Princeton, Harvard, and Yale).

Things Done Right:
Not much. Finished sub-10 hours, so it wasn’t a total loss. Had to rally the last dozen miles to do that though, thankfully they were mostly downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
Everything. Didn’t eat or drink enough. Started a bit too fast. Finished a bit too slow.

Any Other Stuff:
Course was pretty tough. Lots of rolling hills. My first CO ultra (moved here from Austin 3.5 months ago) so the hills and altitude are still kicking my butt. Schwag, aid stations (not including the volunteers, who were great), and post-race food/activities were garbage.

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Long training run — finish, not too beaten up
Results: Finished and felt good on Sunday
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
I stuck to my run plan for the week, not changing any training except for Thursday Barr Trail run only to No Name, knowing I’d get additional hills on Saturday.

I started at the rear of the pack to in sure I wouldn’t get caught up in the excitement of the “race.” I ran along with Dana for a short time and reminded her to walk the hills then caught up with Gordon and chatted for a few miles. I caught Judy D and Dr. Lisa a short time later, we chatted for sometime before I decided to hit the outdoor restroom and relieve myself of the morning tea. I was using my new Fuel Belt hydration pack and it seemed to really help me hydrate as I found myself behind a rock 4-5 times. I later caught up with Chuck C. an ultra running buddy from my days in Houston who now splits his time between Houston and a home in Leadville. He was kind enough to share some advice about running WS and the news of other friends in Houston.

I came into the turnaround in 4:33, about 35 minutes slower than the previous year. All my additional walking was paying off as I really felt good.

Mary Claire, Jonathon’s wife assisted my transition to a sleeveless shirt and more gels for the second loop and I then took off forgetting to change shoes and taking a pair of gloves.

I continued to walk the hills and run the down hills and flat portions. It was good to be at the last aid station and see a 5 miles to go sign. I guess I wanted to get some additional miles and time on my feet as I missed a left turn on the road and ran an additional mile until a couple of volunteers came along in a truck to tell me I was off course and I ran back up to the turn and back on track. I ran the rest of the way in and finish feeling good and said to Gordon 50 yards from the finish “Beer, beer” and he said to Jonathon, “he must be feeling good since he didn’t ask for water.”

We all chatted for a while and enjoyed one more cold one before Gordon and I headed back to the Springs.

Things Done Right:
Ran my race

Things Done Wrong:
Missed that damn turn

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: sub 8:00
Results: 7:52
Website: http://collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
This is a beautiful trail run on dirt roads outside of Buena Vista. The weather and course conditions were near perfect even though it rained/snowed the night before.

Things Done Right:
I trained hard. The course is very runnable so I had to make sure not to run too hard. Drank and ate appropriately.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have used a little more gel.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a great low-key race and the course is very enjoyable. I always seem to forget how painful 50 miles can be until I am in the middle of it.

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Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: To finish my first ultra in almost 2 years (hopefully under 10 hours)
Results: 10:28

General Summary:
This is the third year I have run Collegiate Peaks. The course is beautiful and although it is hilly, it is not a really difficult course. Aid station volunteers are always friendly, low key ultra running event. $55 for 50 miles is a pretty good deal since you get a long sleeve tech shirt and gloves thrown in the deal:) This was my first race since having a c-section delivery in December. I was wholly under trained and overweight, which is probably to be expected with a 4 month old baby. I felt alright until mile 30, at which point my stomach and my legs decided that they had really had enough. For the next 10 miles I crawled along. My feet were throbbing with every step. Even on the downhill I could barely jog. I contemplated turning at 30 and heading back, but my ego is too big for that and I have never DNF’d a race; I didn’t feel like starting now. After a lot of prayer, dumping out my Gatorade and only doing water and gel, and a lot of walking, I was able to catch a second wind for the last 8 miles (which are primarily downhill). I had a strong last 6 miles and managed to actually pass a few people (ok, so they were suffering and walking, or throwing up, but I still passed them:) Overall, it was probably a bad idea to do the 50 mile option on this race, but it is done.

Things Done Right:
Went out slow. Took gel every hour/hour and a half through the whole race. Walked most of the hills. Prayed a lot when I started to suffer. Didn’t DNF.

Things Done Wrong:
I did not train enough for a 50 mile race. I had 4 long runs (18, 2x20, and 27) going into the race, which is not nearly enough time on my feet. I am still carrying an extra 7-8 pounds from the pregnancy. Didn’t cut my toenails so I am going to lose both on my big toes.

Any Other Stuff:
Great course and volunteers. The Incline Club has a great showing every year.

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Paul J Smith reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: win
Results: lost
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
First race as an old man. Just turned 50. Was hoping to finish and if I got real lucky to win. It wasn’t my lucky day but I did finish and was happy to do so. Great weather and many friends along the way and at the end made for a very good experience.

Things Done Right:
I picked a race that Eric Gabe wasn’t running so no pressure.

I ate and drank well.

I went out slow for the first 100 yards.

Things Done Wrong:
I picked a race that Eric Gabe wasn’t running. I think I would have beaten him if he showed.

I ate and drank too well. Gained weight.

I went slow for the first 100 yards. This kept me from being able to say that I was winning at any point.

I got too tired and ran too slow and let too many people pass me.

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Collegiate Peaks Trail Run — 25 Miles - Buena Vista, Colorado - May 6, 2006

Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 25 Miles
Goal: Get in a Good Training Run
Results: Got in a Good Training Run
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
Ideal weather conditions for the race. Cool start with bright blue skies. No rain or snow except for running through the showers of snow melting off the trees up at the high point. Trail was in great shape after the rain the night before. Challenging course, with incredible vistas of the snow-capped Collegiate Peaks.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy. Finished feeling strong. Walked most of the uphills.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing.

Any Other Stuff:
Great race, well organized be the Buena Vista Optimist Club. The pre-race meal was better than in past years.

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Bob Mishler reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 5:00
Results: 4:41
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
25 or 50 miles in hills east of Buena Vista

Things Done Right:
prepared properly, ran steady

Things Done Wrong:
n/a

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John Mills reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 5 hrs
Results: 5:35

General Summary:
Great race, well supported, beautiful course.

Things Done Right:
Train, train, train.

Things Done Wrong:
Need more long (20 miles) training runs.

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John Cassidy reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 4:50
Results: 5:24
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
One big 25M loop. Between 8200 to 9400. High point at 18.5 miles. A few Incline Club members there, most of the CRUD people were there. Harry came in 3rd for the 50M. If you are doing the 50M, you do the second loop in reverse. They let you drop to the 25M race during the race if you choose to, thus avoiding a DNF for the 50M.

Things Done Right:
Signed up, had fun. Looked around, it’s a neet place.

Things Done Wrong:
Started at 10:00 minute mile pace for the first flat/road 3 miles. Slowly passed people from there on. Slow passing slow means 21 minutes slower than last year. Maybe a 9:30 opening would have put me in a different group — since I tend to match the pace with runners close to me. Remember this for the PPA/PPM. I can run a 8:30 pace for a 1/2 marathon for comparison.

Any Other Stuff:
Really pretty course. No Barr Trail type climb here — All runnable if it took place in the first 2 hours. After 2 hours, I have walk the hills. The grade was like rampart range road. Longest climb between 15 to 18.5 miles topping out at 9400ft. For comparison, my PPA/PPM times are 4:30/7:20.

About 75% of runners get a door prize.
Tech shirt and gloves are included with entry.

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Eryn Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 25
Goal: Complete 50 mile
Results: Didn’t... 25 miler by default

General Summary:
I was in no way ready to do a 50. Otherwise, the race was great-- stocked aid stations, well marked and beautiful course. Cool neon green shirt!

I had a hard time keeping food down during the race. Never had problems during training, but nerves might have played a role in that. Because of the lack of fueling, miles 14-17 were not so hot.

I’ll be back next year with my eye on the 50 again, but better prepared this time.

Things Done Right:
Lots of long runs, consistent training.

Things Done Wrong:
No speedwork. Trudging along on the long runs was a bad way to prepare for a race. Next year I will start the speedwork in January and work on increasing my quantity and quality of training.

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Tom Hamilton reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 5:40
Results: 5:54

General Summary:
Good weather and good trail conditions after Friday rain. Great views of the Collegiate Peaks.

Things Done Right:
Training run after a long work week.

Things Done Wrong:
Worked late Friday night and had to drive to BV on Saturday morning. Some stomach problems during the run.

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Skyline Ridge Trail Run - Palo Alto, CA - April 29, 2006

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 50km, 5,190’ of climbing, between 2,000’ — 2,600’
Goal: Run strong/smart. Possibly win, depending on who else showed up. Negative split.
Results: 1st place. 4:21. Didn’t negative split.
Website: http://www.pctrailruns.com/

General Summary:
Course started with a 23k out-and-back, then two 14km lollipop loops.

I ran the first 23k easy, staying just off the lead. I ran an even effort level. The other 50k guy ran the uphills a little harder, so I would fall back a bit there, then catch up on the downhills. When I pulled alongside him, about 21.5k, he surged up a steep hill. I kept an even pace and let him go, but knew then that I would probably win.

I picked it up at the start of the 14ks. I caught, and took the lead at the top of the first climb. I continued to open it up throughout the first 14k. Because of the fog, I couldn’t tell how much of a lead I had.

Near the end of the first 14k, I tripped and twisted my ankle again. It got stiff, so I had trouble pushing off to get power uphill, and had trouble running smoothly on the flats and downhills. I had about a 4-minute lead at the start of the final 14k. Because of my ankle, my splits were slower, and I thought he might catch me. I knew I still had at least a 2-minute lead, with 4k to go. Otherwise, I couldn’t tell. I ended up winning by 10minutes. Because of the ankle and quads (see things done wrong), I was slower on the final 14k.

Things Done Right:
Slept well the night before. It helps when the race isn’t a peak race.

Ate sufficiently, but lightly before the race.

Managed fuel, fluids and electrolytes well during the race. With the fog, it’s hard to tell how much I’m sweating. Two years ago, at the MiWok 100k (in nearby Marin), I thought I was sweating a lot, but it was just the fog. I took too many Endurolytes, and ended up hypernatremic — pulling fluids out of my blood/muscles to balance up high sodium levels in my stomach — essentially dehydrating my muscles despite drinking a lot.

Ran to win, and ran confidently from the front. I don’t have a lot of experience winning. It’s still something I’m learning how to do, and how to feel about it.

Things Done Wrong:
Sprained ankle 9 days before.

Didn’t taper enough. Because of the ankle sprain, I rode my road bike the weekend prior — 57mi with 6,000’ climbing on Sat; another 50mi on Sunday, with a 5k road running race in the middle. My quads were still a bit tired and sore going into the race. Although I wanted to do well, the race was primarily just for fun (something to do while my wife was at a conference), and training.

Twisted my ankle again, about 36.5k into the race.

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Greenland 50k - Greenland Open Space - April 29, 2006

Greenland 50k - Greenland Open Space - April 29, 2006
Andy Cullan reports:
Distance: 50k
Goal: finish
Results: finished/5:15ish

General Summary:
Just went with the mentality of finishing my first ultra marathon. Day started windy with snow showers and brief glimpses of the sun for the first 3 laps, then clearing and really windy for the last lap. Race is set as a 12.5, 25 and 50k race — 4 x 8 mile ish laps.

Things Done Right:
Ate very well the night before — spaghetti w/meat sauce, large salad and good hydration for the days before. Stuck with my plan of hanging back and not getting caught up with the shorter distance runners. Clothing was just right — shorts, long and short sleeve shirt, vest and gloves. Carried no water as there were water stops every 4 miles or so.

Things Done Wrong:
Tried Succeed and it may have upset my stomach a little. Got caught up with another runner and ran most of the third lap too fast, which made the last 8 mile lap a little tough — had to walk a couple of the hills.

Any Other Stuff:
Nicely run race.

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Greenland 25k Trail race - Greenland, CO - April 29, 2006


Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 25k
Goal: <2.08 (<8 min pace)
Results: 2h13m (>8 min pace)
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
A chilly morning. On my way out of the house I decided to bring my long legged tights and wind jacket “just in case.” As it turned out it was nice to have them as it started to snow and it was windy.

Things Done Right:
I held back on the first out of two loops and paced myself. Therefore it was easy to pick up on the second loop. Brought my camelback so I did not have to slow down at the aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not taper enough (at all?). I also have a nagging pain in my left glut. Not sure if it is overtrained. Prevented me from running hard on the uphills. Should have changed the battery in my HR monitor before the race. It decided to quit on the second lap.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was on a nice, wide trail over a rolling terrain. On the trail you have a great view in all directions. Even though it is close to I-25 you don’t really notice the interstate. The course was well marked.

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Lori Hawkins reports:
Distance: 25k
Goal: 2:45
Results: 2:46
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
Good trail, good running weather, blue skies alternating with clouds/wind/snow. Double track and single track rolling hills. All races started together on double track, so the start was very slow for the first mile. Maybe this helped, because I felt GREAT on the first loop. Even the big hill at mile 10 wasn’t too bad.

Things Done Right:
Tapered a lot, massage on Wed, ate and hydrated well Sat. morning, dressed right and trained with IC. Was worried about the distance because so far I had only gone that far with some uphill hiking involved. But only walked 3 very short segments. I think the slow start was to my benefit.

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t think of any.

Any Other Stuff:
Great 8 mile loop for runners, bikers and horses. Luckily no horses or dogs this day. Can extend it south to the Santa Fe Trailhead in Palmer Lake.<

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Matt Von Thun reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: 1:48:00
Results: 1:45:29
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
One of the main goals for this race was to try out a new system of fuel and hydration in hopes of avoiding the late race leg cramps that have plagued me in most of my other long races.

Lap 1: I started by running at a pace close to the top speed I would typically reach during a two hour long run, it felt comfortable and sustainable. I was being very diligent in drinking from my camelbak every 10min. The first mile marker I encounter was labeled 2.5mi. From that point to the 3.0mi mark I ran 3:30. I did not see a 3.5mi marker, but at the 4mi mark I clocked my pace at 6:43. I was pleasantly surprised because I felt my overall effort had been steady, and this last mile had been up hill, yet the clocked pace was faster. My overall pace still was very comfortable and it still felt more like a training run than a race. When I reached the turn around and looked ahead, the only people I could see were the two lead 50k runners about ¼ mile distant. The other four 25k runners that I knew were ahead of me were out of sight.

Lap2: My goal for the second lap was to run it at the same pace or slightly faster. As I clocked myself at the first two check points I found that my pace was almost identical to the first lap. At each subsequent check point I found my splits to be about five seconds per mile faster up until the last mile. The gap between myself and the first two 50k runners closed only by a very small amount during the first flat section of the second loop, but when we started approaching the hill on the back stretch of the loop, the gap started closing significantly, and by the top of the hill, I had passed both of the runners. As we started the long 4mi descent back to the finish, one of the 50k guys caught back up with me and we exchanged leads back and forth until about a mile and a half from the turnaround/finish. The pace at this point still felt very comfortable and now, knowing I would not cramp up like last year I picked up the pace significantly, leaving the 50k runner behind and I ran the last mile at a sub six minute pace (about 40sec/mile faster than during lap 1).

Things Done Right:
Did not start out too fast. Drank and re-fueled consistently.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing of consequence

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Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 25k
Goal: <2.08 (<8 min pace)
Results: 2h13m (>8 min pace)
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
A chilly morning. On my way out of the house I decided to bring my long legged tights and wind jacket “just in case.” As it turned out it was nice to have them as it started to snow and it was windy.

Things Done Right:
I held back on the first out of two loops and paced myself. Therefore it was easy to pick up on the second loop. Brought my camelback so I did not have to slow down at the aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not taper enough (at all?). I also have a nagging pain in my left glut. Not sure if it is overtrained. Prevented me from running hard on the uphills. Should have changed the battery in my HR monitor before the race. It decided to quit on the second lap.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was on a nice, wide trail over a rolling terrain. On the trail you have a great view in all directions. Even though it is close to I-25 you don’t really notice the interstate. The course was well marked.

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Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: sub 1:50:00
Results: 1:51:00
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/other/Greenland50K.html

General Summary:
Runners had choice of running one 8 mile loop, 2 loops for 25K, or 4 loops for 50K. Each loop had a vertical climb of 500 feet, so a total of 1000 feet of climbing in the 25K. Most of the race was on double (or slightly more) track trail. Good race.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go out too hard. Kept reminding myself my time would not be as fast as some lower altitude races.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t wear gloves. My hands, and especially my fingers were so cold I couldn’t untie my shoes or zip up my coat/windbreaker. It was still funny to try to move them quickly but not be able.

Any Other Stuff:
The weather this year was better than last year in the way of no snow, ice or much mud on the course but it was fairly windy most of the time. The temps kept falling throughout the race and going into the final mile snow starting falling and flying horizontally into our faces making it pretty miserable for a short while.

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Brickyard 8 Miler - Martinez, CA - April 23, 2006

Nancy Hobbs reports:
Distance: 8 tough miles
Goal: faster than my training run the day before
Results: faster than my training run the day before — 4th woman, 1:01:29
Website: http://diablorunners.com

General Summary:
There are two events, a 4 mile and an 8 mile. I bounce back and forth between the two distances every year (last year I did the 4, in 2004 I did the 8). The Diablo Road Runners do a great job putting on this event and about 350 runners participate each year. Great time to be in the East Bay.

Things Done Right:
Went out easy, stayed at a comfortable pace throughout. Enjoyed the event.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran the course the day before (!) and my legs were a bit tired. Nearly swallowed a bug at 3 miles — coughed that sucker back out. Took water at the 4 mile turn around and got it down the wrong pipe and coughed for about 1/8 mile or so. Need to watch the drinking, or stop for a better swig.

Any Other Stuff:
The hills just don’t quit. Just as tough on the outbound as the return. Beautiful views of the Carquinez Straits. Cool Bricks for prizes!

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Boston Marathon - Boston, MA - April 17,2006

John Goodloe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 3 hours
Results: 3:10 :(
Website: http://www.baa.org

General Summary:
Race conditions were perfect, 55 degrees & overcast. 22,000 runners, 20K who qualified and about 2K running for a charity. The race had a two wave start this year which seemed to solve a lot of complaints about it taking 30 minutes for the last runner to cross the starting line. My impression was that the race was extremely well organized from the bus shuttles at the start to the bag pick up at the end. Better than New York, although NYC has more entrants. The tradition and history of the race is well respected and represented. It really makes you feel a part of a the legacy.

Things Done Right:
Well hydrated, well rested. I arrived a day early and went to the expo early on Sunday. I went back to the room and stayed off my feet. Because of the race organization, it was possible to stay off your feet for the race morning as well.

Things Done Wrong:
I will have to limit this to saying that my training program was too much for my 44 year old body. I piled on too much mileage too early, got hurt about 5 weeks out and spent the rest of the time trying to heal, run, hurt, rest, hurt, etc. The last 2.5 weeks did not have enough running, and I lost some fitness there. At the starting line, I had peaked early and didn’t really have the strength to run 26 miles at my goal pace. So, I ran my goal pace (6:40) until about mile 16 when I started slipping down down down to my worst mile (25) at 9:19. It was painful, depressing, etc. etc. But I finished.

Any Other Stuff:
I’ll be back — with a new training program.

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Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:22
Results: 3:31
Website: http://www.bostonmarathon.org/

General Summary:
The weather was perfect, cloudy and cool. The crowds were fantastic.

Things Done Right:
I was there, I ran and completed the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing. It was a beautiful experience.

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Gary Hellenga reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Finish
Results: Finished — 3:48:00
Website: http://bostonmarathon.org

General Summary:
Great day for running — mid-50’s, and a sea-level course! Pretty poor time (for me), but probably as good as I could have expected, given my training situation. Got to meet up with several IC friends (Yvonne Carpenter, Kelly Ellis, John Goodloe) and running friends from Bozeman at the race.

Things Done Right:
Ran smart. Was injured almost all of 2005, and was only able to build up to a couple of 15-16 milers before the race, so I adopted a training schedule with just 3 running days per week, and applied the run/walk approach Jeff Galloway promotes on the Runners World web site. The regular walk breaks allowed me to race 10 miles farther than any of my training runs without dying, and made this my easiest marathon since 1981! I recovered quickly and am excited to start running on a consistent basis again.

Things Done Wrong:
Not too much. Would like to have been better prepared, but there wasn’t much else I could have done with the injuries and illnesses I went through. Next time, though, I’ll probably help out those poor Wellesley girls holding up the “Kiss Me!” signs ...

Any Other Stuff:
Lynn and I figured this would probably be the only time we could do Boston together — otherwise, I probably would have waited until I’d had a reasonable training build-up before committing to doing this race. This is definitely a “must-do” for any marathoner, at some point in his/her career!

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David Reily reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:40 — 3:55
Results: 3:45:33
Website: http://www.baa.org

General Summary:
110th running of the Boston Marathon and my third race there. First time to have have a two-wave start. Half the crowd took off at noon, the other half at 12:30pm. Hills are between 16-21 miles. Large, supportive crowds the entire way. Excellent expo with free, cool posters. Get there early (package pickup at the Expo) if you want a small or medium T-shirt — they went fast.

Things Done Right:
Ate well, drank plenty, dressed right. Evaluated my training and race-day weight and set my goal appropriately. Raced how I had trained with intermittent walk breaks every two miles. Strategically placed my “Team-Dave” supporters on the course with cameras.

Things Done Wrong:
Wasn’t able to lose the final 5-8 pounds I had done on previous marathons. Wasn’t able to train as much as previously due to new job pressures. Lacked significant speed training.
Calculator = NA

Any Other Stuff:
Watch out for the bumpy asphalt and trolley tracks after Cleveland Circle about mile 22-23. I took a good tumble and skinnned my hands good.... but saved the face! The crowd groaned when I went down, then applauded when I got back up. How embarrassing! Also, I recommend reading some history about the course before the race — makes it more meaningful when you run it.<

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Yvonne Carpenter reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:15
Results: 3:29:57
Website: http://www.bostonmarathon.com

General Summary:
Given that my last IC race report was for the 2001 PPM, I thought I could use more “real estate” on the club newsletter to make up for it! WARNING: It is long!

I qualified for Boston last year at the Chicago Marathon (Chicago was in Oct, so I did not submit a race report — my time in Chicago was 3h 23m — my goal was 3h 10m). I was convinced that the reason I fell apart in Chicago at mile 13 was due to going out too fast (I went 5 to 10 seconds per mile faster than pace for the first 10 miles). So I stuck to the same training for Boston, but switched the long runs to the Garden of the Gods roads as opposed to the other flatter roads I used for Chicago. It seemed like I had done all the right things: long runs of 20+ miles on the GOG roads, mile repeats on the treadmill mostly at 6:40 pace (the last session was 9 x 1 mile @6:45), minute on/off hill work on the treadmill @ 13% grade, easy runs the rest of the time (never less than 75 minutes), off on Sundays. Things that tested my patience and wit were: got the Flu 2 months before the race; a left arch nag and a right calf nag that seemed determined to stay.

I got to Boston on Saturday April 15, got the race packet/number on Sunday April 16. Ate only bagels, Luna bars, water and pasta. Headed on time for the shuttle bus to get to the start line. Had disposable gloves and rain poncho. Took many choices of shirts to the start line since the weather was “iffy.” Had a towel and a cushy pad to sit on while waiting for the start (at Boston you sit for hours before the start). Drank and ate plenty the morning of the race. Was able to use the bathroom regularly. Anyway, everything was as good as it gets for pre-race. I even drove the course on Sunday and did not think much of Heartbreak Hill. I did notice there were MANY other hills on the course. And downhills. Many, many, many ups and downs in fact. On asphalt. Hummm... Not that I did not know there were going to be uphills and downhills, there were just way more than I anticipated. No big deal, I thought. After all, I train in Colorado :-)

The gun went off. It took me over 5 minutes to pass the start line. We were packed tight! I was determined not to get sucked into a fast pace. I stuck to my plan for the first 5 miles. I sped up slightly after that, still within my planned pace. I constantly checked my condition: can I do another X miles at this pace? The answer was always YES. So I kept going. At mile 7 a monkey threw a wrench at my race! I think it was a test. I think I passed! A bozo cut me off and came to a halt right in front of me to savor a cup of water. I tried to go around him and the volunteer handing him the water so not to knock both down and stepped on something (3” high pile of stepped on paper water cups??? Who knows!!) twisting my ankle real bad. It was so painful that I limped for the next half mile. The pain slowly went away. I could tell something was wrong, but not wrong enough to throw away a season of training and drop out! I felt the ankle the rest of the way, but I believe it had no impact on my race result. I almost completely forgot it after a couple of miles. Other than the ankle incident, everything was fine for many miles. As a matter of fact, none of my pre-race nags (arch and calf) ever flared up during the race. I did notice an increasing discomfort on the switches from uphill to downhill, and vice-versa.

On mile 17 my left quad started to hurt. That was a sample of what was about to unfold. The pain grew and I started compensating on the other leg, which started hurting within 2 miles. On Mile 19, I started to realize this was going to be ugly, very ugly indeed. Now every grade switch was miserable. And may I remind you that the famous Heartbreak Hill was still to come!!!! When I got to it, it went by fast, but coming down on the other side was no picnic. By mile 23, I could not phantom running another 3.2 miles. It seemed literally IMPOSSIBLE. My quads were burning so bad. I thought I was going to have to stop and maybe sit for a while and stretch. Maybe cry a little while I was at it. I felt so humbled by the course — almost humiliated. A flashback of Matt’s 1994 Leadville came to mind where he took almost an hour to “crawl” the last mile, with no other option. So I thought the fastest way to the finish line would be to keep running — as fast as I could. I have no clue how I got to mile 25. I even passed a friend that had passed me early on. He said I “looked determined to do something,” so he did not say hi — only “fed off of me and tried to follow me” (he finished only 3 minutes behind). At mile 25 I glanced at my watch and quickly realized that I had ~ 11 minutes to break 3:30 (I also noticed that I was not brain dead yet since I could still do math!!) I HAD to at least try. I ran as fast as I could for the next 1.2 miles — as if it was a 1.2 mile race. The pain was undescribable. I never looked at my watch again until I crossed the finish line. There was no point since I was going as fast as possible. Any extra effort raising my arm would probably cost me. I actually made it with 3 seconds to spare. I could not believe it was over. I was so glad I could stop running.

I headed to the gear check, got my dry clothes and waited for the others to finish. We headed back to the hotel to shower and rest before dinner. My ankle was all red and purple. After dinner I iced it and took some Ibuprofen. It was extremely stiff and painful that night. The next morning, boy, oh boy, that thing looked like a modern art rainbow painting the size of a grapefruit!!! It was sooooo much fun to travel back home and then to Brazil the next day on those perfect quads and ankle, handling a 4 year old :-)

I am now analyzing what happened and why I fell apart 2 out of 2 races. I need to adjust my training because these last 2 races were no fun at all. An Incline Club runner once told me that running the PPM was more painful than delivering a child. At the time I told her that, for me, delivering Kyla was way more painful than the PPM or any other race. I did get a “pain” PR at Boston though: that was the most pain I ever felt, topping even Kyla’s delivery! And there was no option for an epidural at mile 23 — I would have stood in line for it!

Things Done Right:
-Trained to eat and drink at the same intervals as the race
-trained on the exact garments I was going to wear race day
-did the long runs on asphalt on an up and down asphalt course
- ate a medium dinner the day before the race
- had something soft to sit on race morning
- ate and drank race morning to account for the noon start
- went to Boston with Lynn and Gary Hellenga who knew well the Boston subway system!
- resisted the initial downhills and held back for the first 5 miles

Things Done Wrong:
I honestly don’t know yet what I did wrong. I wish I did so I could fix it! So here is a list of what I THINK I did wrong — any input is appreciated, as a matter of fact!
- mile repeats were too slow for the race pace goal (mile repeats were @ 6:40, goal race pace was 7:20)
- long runs should have been longer (21 miles was the longest I did)
- long runs should have been faster (I was doing them at ~ 8:50 minute/miles)
- should not have gotten the flu (I am taking the flu shot this year!)
- should not have twisted my ankle (humm...)
- who knows...I am puzzled...

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Umstead 100 mile endurance run - Raliegh NC - April 8-9, 2006

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: under 24 hours
Results: 23 hours 39 minutes 58 seconds
Website: www.ncroadrunners.org

General Summary:
Going into the race right after a stressful move, I wasn’t sure how I would do. Stomach problems the week before the race made eating more than 500-600 calories a day difficult.

Things Done Right:
To get enough calories, without the bulk and endless chewing needed with vegan bars and other expensive energy bars, I decided to take a chance and eat Little Debbie snack cakes the whole way since I was unable to eat much prior to the race. I ate 20 total, at 300 calories a pop. They were very easy to chew, and much better tasting than those over priced organic vegan healthy barley and carrot raw crappy tasting bars.A calorie is a calorie. And took in 10 caffeine pills too. Needless to say, I had lots of energy.

Things Done Wrong:
Over dressed. But I didn’t want to waste time changing cloths during the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of cold windy North Carolina rain storms at night helped keep me awake along with all the Little Debbies and caffeine pills. As far as I know, 20 Little Debbies eaten during a 100 is a record.

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Platte River Trail Half Marathon - Littleton to Denver - April 2, 2006


Connilee Walter reports:
Distance: Half Marathon
Goal: 1:29:xx
Results: 1:29:35, although this does take some explanation!
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com

General Summary:
Don’t be fooled by the word ‘trail’ in the race name. This race is 100% paved and 90% of that is concrete. It starts out in the clean and friendly downtown of Littleton, loops through the ‘city’, then drops down to the Platte River where concrete trails lead runners along the sometimes-scenic river towards Denver with a finish line and party at the Buckhorn Exchange.

The course is relatively flat with the only major ‘hill’ being a major overpass towards the end of the race, and several other ups and downs as runners passed under roads on the trail.

This year, sadly, a body was found on the course and the course was re-routed through an even-less-scenic and industrial part of Denver, making this an unexpected 13.8 mile race instead of 13.1.

My clock time was 1:34:30 for 13.8 miles. Adjusted back to true half marathon pace, finish time was 1:29:35.

Things Done Right:
Running consistent mileage lately. Ran 2 of my 3 previous long runs on pavement to prep for the course. Dressed appropriately for the weather which was warm (high in the 50s) but with winds that, according to the forecast, threatened to reach 20-30 MPH by late morning. Hydrated well, and remembered the things I needed on race morning. Ran my goal pace and hit my goal time despite the things done wrong.

Things Done Wrong:
Intended to run the first half of the half with a (faster) running buddy. Since we were both thinking that she would pull ahead towards the end, we planned to pace together the first ~6.5 and then re-evaluate. However, the day ended up being less-than-perfect for her and the pace slowed considerably even before mile 6.5. Though I was feeling strong, I held on until mile 8 hoping to help her salvage her pace (our pace). The lesson learned is that I should have bopped ahead at 6.5 if not sooner when it became clear that we were at different paces that day.

In the end, it turned out ‘ok’ in that I was able to ‘spring forward’ (pun intended, daylight savings weekend, get it? ;) and ran the last 5.8 at better than planned goal pace and hit my goal time. Just wish I’d done it sooner.

Any Other Stuff:


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Pablo Najera reports:
Distance: 14 Miles
Goal: 2:00
Results: 1:57
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com/

General Summary:
Felt good, completed my goal

Things Done Right:
Kept a good pace throughout the race

Things Done Wrong:
?

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Edgar Trillo reports:
Distance: 14 Miles
Goal: 1:35
Results: 1:36
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com/

General Summary:
Great training race. It was originally a 1/2 marathon, but due to a homicide on the trail. Race directors had to modify the course during the race making 7/10th of a mile longer. I was hoping for a 1:35 on the normal distance (13.1), but I end up with a 1:36 on the modified course. I think I would have been under 1:30 on the normal distance, which is better than I expected.

Things Done Right:
Kept a solid pace throughout the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t have much of a kick on the last half mile or so.

Any Other Stuff:
There was a homicide on the course between miles 10 and 11 and the course directors didn’t find out until the leader was on mile 8.

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29th Annual Capitol 10K - Austin, Texas - April 2, 2006

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 10 K
Goal: 52 minutes
Results: 52:06
Website: http://www.statesman.com/sports/content/cap10k/index.html

General Summary:
10K road race through downtown Austin; very warm, humid conditions; 13,600 runners

Things Done Right:
Paced conservatively, taking into account the muggy conditions! Completed my 29th straight Capitol 10K ... all under the original qualifying time of 55 minutes ... opportunity to go for number 30 next year.

Things Done Wrong:
Neglected speedwork for months before race!

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Moab Marathon - Moab, Utah - April 1, 2006

Moab Marathon - Moab, Utah - April 1, 2006
Martina Ritchie reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: to finish
Results: didn’t

General Summary:
The race starts at Deadhorse Point & runs down to Hwy 191 (which goes into Moab). The first 8 miles were up hill; the rest were down. The brochure stated the course was on a bicycle path. In reality, the “path” was the right side of the concrete road out of the start. The aid stations only had water until well into the last part of the marathon. By that time most runners weren’t interested. Also...(on the way to the start, the bus driver got lost & missed the turn off, getting us to the start later than I had hoped).

Things Done Right:
When I got to the start, it looked like rain (and the wind was really blowing)so I took my Gortex. I also took my own “gu” and electrolyte drink.

Things Done Wrong:
--because of the concrete pavement (& racing downhill), my back really took a beating. Even though I took Advil at the start, it started spasming around mile 9. By mile 22, it was impossible to run or walk. In my next marathon, I’ll be certain to see what I’ll be racing on as concrete is unforgiving.

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Knoxville Marathon - Knoxville TN - March 26, 2006

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: My #1 goal was to finish so I could claim state #40
Results: 3:44:30
Website: http://www.knoxvillemarathon.com/home.cfm

General Summary:
I am collecting states so I run more marathons then I should, I do not do the standard peak/taper that is conducive to optimum performance; that said, I will provide some observations about both the Knoxville Marathon for the benefit of anyone considering it in their running future and also comment on my personal experience.

Things Done Right:
My training leading up to the marathon did not have all the quality I would have liked, but I have been very consistent since Thanksgiving, doing something almost every day even if it was just 2-3 junk miles. I credit my grand doggie, Ashley, who I have been ¡§babysitting¡¨ since November for the consistent training. She is a great running partner, who does not seem to understand when I tell her about all the work I have to do, which causes me to get out even if it is just for a quick workout. Jim & Matt in their book say there is no such think as junk miles; I agree, I really think this marathon went as well as it did because of all those days of doing ¡§just junk miles.¡¨

Things Done Wrong:
I messed with the ankle bracelet that the timing chip was attached — see tale of woe & intrigue below.

Any Other Stuff:
You could tell the race organizers took pride and worked hard to put on good event. The course web site was nicely designed & up to date; race e-mails were sent out on a regular basis. There was a nice expo the day before the race, the race packet was filled with information, discount offers and goodies (when is the last time you got a free Frisbee?). The race was using a timing chip, the chip unlike others I have used was attached to an ankle bracelet. I felt the only pre-raceday shortcoming was lack of a pasta feed (although the host hotel had a pasta buffet and the packet included discounts at several restaurants with good pre-race food options) still as a ¡§50 stater¡¨ one of the fun parts of the process is hanging out trading stories about other marathons/states. The other issue was the ankle bracelet, not only did it make me feel like I was on prison release, I also was concerned that it might be awkward, annoying, or cause skin irritation. So I did what any concerned runner would do, I improvised: I discarded the bracelet and attached the chip to my shoe, little did I know what the result of this adjustment would lead to.

I was concerned about a warm day for a day in late March in Tennessee, not a problem. In fact the day before the marathon I could not do a planned easy hike/run in Smokey Mountain National Park because the road was closed due to snow. Race morning it was 28 degrees at the start, warmed to 40 by end, lots of people though it was cold ¡V I thought: awesome conditions!

The first half of course was very scenic: through the UT campus, along the river, through an upscale neighborhood (complete with option of a DIRT path fº), then a bike path through the tress of Tyson Park (probably not named for Mike, maybe named after the chicken company ¡V not sure). It was not a flat course; there were a few short steep hills, and some sections of rolling hills. Some runners felt it was a very tough course; Incliners would not share those feelings.

At 13 miles, the half marathoners headed for the finish at Neyland Stadium, we marathoners got to see the ¡§other side¡¨ of Knoxville: industrial areas, poorer neighborhoods, some time on a highway, and even a brief run through a construction zone.

Traffic control was good as was support on course, however if you need lots of folks cheering you at many steps along the route look to a larger marathon. The running surface was mostly asphalt, with a few short stretches of concrete (the dirt trail I mentioned above lasted just a couple of miles). The finish was on the football field (between the hedges), in Neyland Stadium. Post race activities (massage, food and awards) were held in the UT basketball arena (lots of banners, mostly for the Lady Vols). If you are into college sports there was lots of history to soak up; including a Todd Helton Ave for Rockies fans.

My #1 goal was to finish so I could claim state #40, marathon #86 (Note: does not include Pikes Peak because that is not a 26.2 mile marathon) 28th straight year of 1 or more marathons. Secondary goals: Sub 4 hour, sub 9 pace, sub 3:50, 8:30 pace, 3:39:59, have fun & not beat up body too much (another marathon in April).

Results: I ran a 3:44:30, my time in motion (subtract pit stopsfº ) was 3:40, I felt good during run, had fun: goals achieved. However I had quite a scare when I first saw the results posted at the post race feed in the basketball arena; next to my name was the letters DQ. I though, what the H---!!

I quickly sought out a race official. She investigated and reported I was DQ¡¦ed for ¡§destroying¡¨ my chip. I went back to my hotel room and shot off e-mails to the race director & timing company (Milliseconds out of Salt Lick City). I got a reply from Milliseconds within an hour. I needed to return the bracelet or pay $5 to have the DQ tag removed. I replied ¡§the check is in the mail¡¨ and my status was changed in time to make the results listing in the morning paper. I never did resolve this question: If I had stayed DQ¡¦ed would I have had to run another marathon in Tennessee?


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The Grasslands Run - LBJ Natl Grasslands, Decatur Texas - March 25, 2006

Tom Hamilton reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: 5:20
Results: 4:48:57
Website: http://www.nttr.org/html/grasslands.htm

General Summary:
The Grasslands Run is a 50 mile, Marathon, 1/2 Marathon run on horse trails in the LBJ NG. The trails are sandy through rolling terrain and were in good shape this year. The weather was great on Sat.

Things Done Right:
Ran a consistent pace, stayed hydrated.

Things Done Wrong:
Get more sleep before the race.

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Catalina Marathon - Catalina Island, CA - March 18, 2006

Mike Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi
Goal: Place in my age group
Results: 2nd
Website: http://www.pacificsportsllc.com

General Summary:
23 miles of trail, 3 miles on pavement... lots of hills, killer views of the Pacific Ocean, and an occasional bison sighting. Since it rained the night before, the course was extremely muddy, especially early on in the race. This slowed the field dramatically. On average, runners who had run the race in the past were about 15 minutes slower than their normal pace. I was about 4 minutes slower than last year.

Things Done Right:
Paced myself well throughout the entire run. I walked a portion of the two steepest hills to save my legs and took it easy during the muddiest portions of the course. Both of these strategies paid off well between miles 13-23, which are the toughest miles of the course. Hydrated well, ate 4 Gu packets, and enjoyed the view. Overall, it was the least painful marathon I’ve run so far.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have probably gone faster for the last 4 miles, which are mostly downhill, but since I have a bad habit of cramping up during the last mile or two of pavement, I took it easy.

Any Other Stuff:
I hid a big afro and some superfly disco sunglasses about a mile from the finish line and put them on for the finish line photo. I’m looking forward to updating my IC site with the photo.

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Chambersburg 1/2 Marathon - Chambersburg, PA - March 18, 2006

Dave Kinton reports:
Distance: 13.1 Miles
Goal: Have fun, beat my brother
Results: 1:24:51, beat my brother

General Summary:
Nice race, rolling hills the entire way. Strong winds from mile 5 to the end. Since I don’t get to race much with my brother we decided to run this one together.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go out to hard, enjoyed myself.

Things Done Wrong:
Training hasn’t been where I had hoped.

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Turret Marathon - Salida, Colorado - March 18, 2006

Bob Mishler reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Enjoy, Stretch Long Run Time Out
Results: Finished in about 5:36
Website: http://www.salidarec.com

General Summary:
First annual. Salida to Turret (old mining town NE of Salida), and back. Return route mostly different, rougher trail. Good climbs, hard to get lost, lots of snow/mud/slop on about half the course (last half). Very nicely organized and run.

Things Done Right:
Showed up, ran a steady run, stayed within current ability.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing I can think of.

Any Other Stuff:
About 60 people did the marathon, maybe 80 did half marathon. Sure to be more next year. Highly recommended.

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A Run Through Time - Salida, CO - 3/18/06

Lori Hawkins reports:
Distance: 1/2 marathon and full
Goal: 1/2 marathon in 2:30
Results: 2:2:23:51
Website: http://www.salidarec.com/ccrc/

General Summary:
Dirt/gravel roads (one mile paved) up to ghost town of Turret. Gain of about 2,000’ for the marathon, per race info. Cool, cloudy weather alternating with warm sun kept runners shedding clothes and re-dressing. Road was similar to Rampart Range Rd, so I felt confident. To me, it would be two runs--the first a tough, long uphill, the second a downhill fly. The first/last mile was a detour hill, that I probably attacked a little too hard on the way out, and had to walk up it at the end.

Things Done Right:
Ate well, hit the port-a-potty before the pre-race meeting, good equipment (including some pink gaiters) and good attitude. Listened to GOOD, rockin’ music on the drive down, so had good stuff in my head. Flew downhill, passed a few runners, and closed in on ones who’d passed me well before the turnaround. Tempo runs, long legs and Barr Trail paid off. Improved A LOT over the past year--no way I could have done a 1/2 this time last year.

Things Done Wrong:
Had trouble during mile 4, ran/walked most of it. But resumed constant running at about mile 5. Still have to work on uphill runs on long distances.

Any Other Stuff:
I was disappointed in and embarrassed by my fellow runners, who chatted while the race director was giving final instructions. First race for a small town, so can’t expect what others offer (timing, mile markers, course info).

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A Run Through Time Marathon - Salida, CO - March 18, 2006

Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4:30:00
Results: 4:02:21
Website: http://www.salidarec.com/ccrc/results/2006-Turret-Marathon-Results.htm

General Summary:
A dirt road/trail marathon from Salida to ghost town of Turret and trails outside of Salida.

Things Done Right:
I decided to run this marathon at the last minute and treated it as a long training run. I did not push myself to hard and was able to finish strong.

Things Done Wrong:
Needed more nutrition during the race and more hill training!

Any Other Stuff:
This was the 1st running of the marathon and the guest race starter is a direct descendant of Zebulon Pike. The first 8 miles are a consistent uphill climb similar to Rampart Range Rd. The next 4 miles to the turnaround at Turret is very hilly with a downhill into Turret. After the turn around, the course goes back to the 1/2 marathon turn around point and heads off into trails for the final 9 miles. It was a beautiful day for a marathon and the late start (9:00 am) made it easy to drive up race day morning.

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Tom Hamilton reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: finish
Results: 6:30
Website: http://www.salidarec.com

General Summary:
First seven miles packed forest road up Ute Creek then snowy, muddy, hilly, rocky four wheel roads to Turret then back to Salida.

Things Done Right:
Dressed right and enjoyed the day and blustery weather.

Things Done Wrong:
Chronic left ankle sprain recurred requiring slow miles on the terrain.

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Jon Teisher reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Finish
Results: 4:47:31

General Summary:
First annual “A Run Through Time” marathon and half marathon. Marathon started in Salida and ran out to the ghost town of Turrett, then finished back in Salida.

Things Done Right:
Stayed in Salida the night before, doing that drive early Sat morning would have sucked. Took the pace out slow, which helped keep me going during the last, difficult parts of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Amicas pizza the night before was still sitting my stomach after the race. Great microbrews there though. Probably underdressed a bit, it got pretty cold up at the top of the hills.

Any Other Stuff:
Course was a lot of fun. Mostly dirt roads, lots of ice and rocks, the last nine miles were pretty muddy and rough. Elevation was between 7000 and 9000 feet, with 3800+ feet of climbing. Tough course, I thought my time woulda been about an hour faster.

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Lake Hodges 50km - Lake Hodges, CA - March 11, 2006
Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: finish
Results: 7:02
Website: http://lakehodges50k.com

General Summary:
LH 50km is run outside of Escondido, CA, around a small lake surrounded by mountains.

Things Done Right:
Went into the race relaxed, with no particular goal, other than to finish. Ate enough, and drank enough, which helped keep me happy.

Things Done Wrong:
I could have pushed a lot harder.

Any Other Stuff:
All night torrential downpours, and early morning thunder storms made for some last minute changes on the course, and along with a new race director, made it one big confusing mess. A lot of runners missed sections of the mountain parts of the race, and finished over an hour ahead of me, which really pissed me off, especially when the RD didn’t even do anything, that I know of, to correct things. I would have finished first in my age group otherwise. A lot of the volunteers were confused too, and told runners to go in the wrong direction. There also was lots of hail and a dead rat on one of the trails to keep things interesting.

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Jeremy Wright North American Snowshoe Championships - Beaver Creek Colorado - March 5, 2006

Matt Carpenter reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Win and pick up a quick $1,250
Results: Lost (2nd by 19 seconds) and got a not so quick $600
Website: http://www.gohighline.com/bcsnowshoe/event4_06_overall.pdf

General Summary:
I jumped into this race at the spur of the moment to put the “hobby books” back in balance. I have developed a nasty little addiction to flying R/C airplanes. Well, the flying is not the nasty part, it is the crashing that is costing all the money.

At any rate, it turns out just jumping into things can be a bad idea. I got schooled and paid for my indiscretion. Well, actually I was paid to get schooled but someone else got paid twice as much to be the teacher.

Things Done Right:
1) Despite some rather comical falls in the singletrack section I did not give up and at least kept the winner in the same zip code.

2) I wore shorts and I think I was the only one who did. It was a great day and I was getting hot with tights just in my warm-up so I can’t imagine what it would have been like to race in tights and jackets like everyone else.

Things Done Wrong:
1) I fell six times to the winner’s one with three of them being in the singletrack. That put me way back although I worked back to about 10 seconds. But then I fell again and got stuck in the snow with about 300 yards to go. Chalk that up to being the first time my snowshoes have seen snow since the last time I did this race in 2001. Five years is too long and I paid for my lack of practice on the skill side of the race. I should have at least thrown on my snowshoes for a couple of training runs. However, in a strange kind of way it was awesome to watch the winner pull away as I enjoy watching people with that kind of skill do their thing. In this race it certainly wasn’t me. I would get up, go another switchback, and fall... Race over:-(

2) I did not read the race rules or lack thereof. I just assumed it was like in 2001 when pretty much every snowshoe race had a 25” snowshoe rule which is what I was running in. Well not any more — no rules! The winner and many others were in what appeared to be 20” shoes. This is not sour grapes on my part as I freely admit it was stupid to give myself such a handicap. But heck their snowshoes looked like kid’s snowshoes next to mine and that is what irks me the most in that I had Kyla’s 16” snowshoes with me for her to play with which since they had no rules I guess I could have worn. Well I guess in theory since they had no rules I could have run in my running shoes as that would have been the fastest on this hardpacked course...

3) I did not take the competition seriously enough. Bottom line, I thought this would be easy money (literally) and because I was not prepared (see #1) and stupid (see #2) the competition creamed me. I tried to console myself in that I did pretty well considering #1 & #2 but in the end I lost and I don’t like to lose. I shall just have to train harder because after all was said and done I only lost by 7 hundredths of a percent!

Any Other Stuff:
The course was hardpacked and all and all it was pointless to be wearing snowshoes other than the fact that it was snowshoe race. In one downhill section they had singletrack packed down in some deep snow. It was like a bobsled run. It would go like 20 yards and switchback and go another 20 yards and switchback for what seemed like about 8 switchbacks. It was fun and frustrating at the same time. I caught myself laughing after one of my falls at the thought of someone else laughing when the set the course just knowing that they were going to take out a lot of people just like they took out me. Kinda reminded me of the way Larry Miller goes about setting the cross country series:-)

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Old Pueblo 50 mile - Soniota AZ - March 4, 2006


Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50+ miles
Goal: under 11 hours
Results: 12:42:19

General Summary:
OP50 is a tough rocky 50 mile run in southern AZ that has an average grade of 6%. Great scenery, and very well marked and organized.

Things Done Right:
nothing

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t drink enough, or eat enough from the get-go. Went into the race tired and grumpy. Missed going under 11 hours.

Any Other Stuff:
The last 4 miles after the final AS is actually 4 1/2. After running for almost 45 minutes after the 46 mile AS, a hiker cheerfully told me that I only had 3 1/2 miles to go. I really had to bite my lip, because I thought I would have surely had less than 3 miles to go. But I think it was good mental training for Leadville and other 100’s, because sometimes you have to keep going even when you are in a big funk. If you keep going long enough, you WILL eventually reach the finish. This is a really tough, but well organized 50 miler, with some of the best volunteers in ultrarunning.

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Snowman Stampede - Cherry Creek State Park - February 25, 2006


Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 20 miles
Goal: 2:54:30 finish top 3 age group
Results: 2:58:01 finished 4th age group
Website: http://www.winterdistanceseries.com

General Summary:
Road and trail race thru Cherry Creek State Park, rolling hills, bike path and single track trail.

Things Done Right:
Good taper, well rested, well hydrated, consistent training.

Things Done Wrong:
Go out a little too fast, seem to start losing consistent pace after mile 15. Need to work on maintaining that for full marathon.

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Coyote4Play - Santa Monica Mountains, Oxnard, California - February 23-26, 2006

Tom Hamilton reports:
Distance: Four day stage run
Goal: log some miles
Results: Thur 7mi, Fri 30mi, Sat 20mi, Sun 12mi.
Website: http://gravityh.com/c4p2006entry.htm

General Summary:
The Coyote4Play is a four day stage run through the Santa Monica Mountains. Three of the days are in Point Mugu State Park and one in the Los Padres National Forest east of Ojai. Half fire roads and half single track. Well supported run with some great gear included. Each night there is a buffet dinner and some kind of activity. I won the bowling tourney.
Thursday is a 7 mile warmup run.
Friday- 50 mile with options for 40, 30 or 20.
Saturday- 40 mile with options for 30, 20 or 12.
Sunday- 30 mile with options for 20 or 12.
About 90 total runners including some of the top U.S. ultrarunners.

Things Done Right:
Enjoyed the warm weather and great views.
No injuries.
Some great meals and gear included in the run price.

Things Done Wrong:
Under hydrated on the 30 miler.
Over beerated at the bowling tournament.
Motel too close to 101 highway noise.
Returned too late Sunday night.
Ran shorter than desired on Saturday in order to watch the finish of the Tour of California bike race in Thousand Oaks.


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George Washington’s Birthday Marathon - Greenbelt, MD - February 19, 2006
Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: under 3
Results: DNF
Website: http://www.dcroadrunners.org/gwmarathon/

General Summary:
I started walking to the starting line in shorts, but quickly realizing that was a no go in the 20 degree temperatures at 10:00 A.M. and a north wind of 10 MPH. I changed into tights. For my upper body I wore a loose thin wicking top, stocking cap and gloves. I was cold. The race consisted of a “bent lollipop stick” and then three loops just under seven miles each around a wildlife refuge and NASA land. Very scenic--also was nostalgically treated to the sounds of a firing range along about a mile for each of the three loops. Almost like home on Rampart.
I ran pretty good through the halfway point (1:28), but when I began to flag around mile 18 I couldn’t maintain my body temp and it went downhill fast. Finally at mile 22 an alarmed race official asked if I was chilly. Yes, I said and he offered his vehicle for me to sit in and warm up. I tried twice to emerge to finish up the race, but each time I began to shiver uncontrollably. Classic hypothermia. Finally I had to agree for him to drive me to the finish line. The second time I have dropped out of a race... First time was Leadville 100 in 2004 at the 87 mile point.

Things Done Right:
Wore tights instead of shorts!

Things Done Wrong:
Needed more up top. It was too cold and I wasn’t quite prepared. It’s always a fine balance when running a marathon. Typically I try to go as skimpy as possible counting on the body temp to warm up from the racing. Indeed, I have worn only a singlet and shorts in every marathon I’ve run with only a couple exceptions.

Any Other Stuff:
Beautiful course. The three loops are nice for pacing purposes. Good race support and organization. Small field of about 300. I was surprised that this was their 45th annual running of the race.

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Orange Curtain 100km/50km - Cerritos Park, CA - February 18, 2006
Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: under 5 hours
Results: 4:54:15
Website: www.oc100k.com

General Summary:
This race was designed for PR’s and was a USATF sanctioned run. It was mostly flat, on a bike path alongside a canal. I wasn’t sure I could break 5 hours, given I had just run a 100, ( or in my case 105 after getting lost) mile race two weeks earlier, then came down with a bad cold for a week.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t over hydrate, and kept the bathrooms breaks at a minimum, which was good, since there were a lot of other people out on the course with theri kids and bikes, and there was nowhere to go, other than the public bathrooms, which were several hundred feet off course.I also learned to pee on the go, although from what I experienced, this is easier for a man. But I really wanted to break 5 hours, and given the way my legs felt after Rocky Raccoon 100 two weeks earlier, it was worth it.

Things Done Wrong:
I could have done a lot better if I had fresher legs, and wasn’t still dealing with the remnants of a cold.

Any Other Stuff:
The 50km consisted of 5 out and back segments. The 3rd one was the toughest mentally. It was harder mentally than physically. Give me mountains and mountains lions, bears, and single track any day over a city park. However, the race staff were great, and the food at the AS was good too.

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Screamin Snowman 10k snowshoe - Eldora, CO - February 12, 2006


Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: sub 1hr 14min (top 10 age group, top 20 overall)
Results: 14 jungbauer jason manitou springs CO 32 M 1:08:24
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com

General Summary:
10k snowshoe trail race at the Nordic center at Eldora ski area. steep hilly course, mostly singletrack, some packed some real loose trail breaking conditions.

Things Done Right:
tapered well, mainly because i have been sick for three weeks, stayed in boulder the night before to make it easier to make it to the race on time. paced myself well up the first hills, probably too well, since there was no mile markers and i had never done the course before i could have gone harder earlier and shaved another 3-5 minutes off my time.

Things Done Wrong:
should have gone harder earlier, overestimated my finish time, i based it on last years finishers and times were much slower last year, due to worse weather conditions. still fighting a cold, should have carried a water bottle, no aid stations and my throat could have used a drink or two while breathing the cold dry air.

Any Other Stuff:
great course, well marked, well supported at the start, finish.

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New World Championship Snowshoe Races - Luck, Wisconsin - February 11, 2006

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K with 5K and 20K available
Goal: Experience a competitive race on snow, do well in my age group, use as a national qualifying race.
Results: 4th overall, 1st in age group, another qualifier

General Summary:
New location this year for this annual race. Now a bit more north of Luck in a woods with a nice lodge that is being remodeled. Previously had based from the golf course in Luck. Nice new course that was very challenging, especially due to the amount of snow, much of it loose from a couple fresh inches overnight. Another twisting course with some challenging hills.

I was initially caught back a bit after the sprint down the road to start. With the single track not allowing for much opportunity to pass, I finally took off when the chance presented itself and moved up a bit. The footing became rather frustrating and it felt as if a lot of energy was being wasted simply to maintain balance. The footing was some of the most difficult I had ever raced in but some training runs had been similar (just that you can stop in training!).

I was happy with the days result and enjoyed the weather, the snow, and the camraderie after the race.

This year I intend to attend the Nationals in Vermont.

Things Done Right:
Raced after a couple months of snowshoe training. Kept a good steady effort at the race with leg strength gained from that training paying off due to the snow conditions the day of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Got caught back a ways at the start but not enough to cause much concern for the length of the entire race.

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Buffalo Run II - Parkville, MO - February 5, 2006

Beverly Weaver reports:
Distance: 8K
Goal: 1 hour and/or not last
Results: 63:01 (and not last...)
Website: http://www.metrowalkandrun.com/

General Summary:
Trail run up and down the hills near the Missouri River; mostly dirt, rocks and wood chips. We crossed several small bridges, one of which was icy. It was cool (22 degrees), but not windy.

Things Done Right:
Training here in Colorado with the Incline Club makes running at lower altitude a breeze. The hills were steep, but I felt strong enough to run up all of them.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have run faster on the downhills; still hate and fear falling on my face. Most downhills had loose rocks and/or tree roots.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was fun to run. We ran across streams and up and down hills. Parkville is outside Kansas City on the north bank of the Missouri River.

The race was poorly managed. No port-o-potties or other toilets at the start or finish. No time clock at the finish. Pull tags were ignored; times and numbers were written down on clip boards as we came across the finish line. Food was bad and they ran out of water before the slower folks (like me) came in.

We paid $25 and my shirt was a leftover shirt from last year’s (5K) race. Not much for our money....

Partial race results can be found at http://www.mararunning.org/buffalo06.html

This was absolutely the only race we could find to run in the Kansas City area over the weekend, so we were happy to participate. We had fun during the race, regardless of the high cost/low value of the race.

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Darrell Weaver reports:
Distance: 8K
Goal: Didn’t have one
Results: 38:55
Website: http://

General Summary:
8 kilometers(more or less)entirely on narrow woodland trails in a county park on the hills over the Missouri river. Trail was a combination of large gravel, wood chip, dirt, grass, creek and gully; some tricky footing (but not for an ICer). A series of loops, winding and rolling. One good hard hill climb about 300 yards long,with switchbacks about as steep as the W’s.

Weather was good: 20 degrees, sunny, no wind.

Poorly organized: no toilet/portapotty facilities, insufficient water at end and none available on the course (even tho I didn’t need it), timing at the end was by hand because the clock wasnt working.

Things Done Right:
I’m trying to closely follow Matt/Jim’s Ascent and Marathon Training Schedule C. Also doing some weight work for my legs. It seems to be paying off because this race felt easy all the way even though I was pushing hard. Finished seventh out of 120-150 runners. Low altitude helped (if the Peak’s air were skim milk, the air in Kansas City would be half and half).

Things Done Wrong:
Although at this point in my IC training I’m about where I should be, I needed more speed to do better in this race. It’s a little discouraging to step hard on the gas and not much happens. Still, I was satisfied, given that this was a spur of the moment/not serious race.

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Iowa State Snowshoe Championships - Hartman Preserve — Cedar Falls, Iowa - February 4, 2006

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 8K
Goal: Qualify for US Snowshoe Nationals
Results: 2nd overall in 34:19 — Qualified for Nationals

General Summary:
Designed to be the inaugural state championship snowshoe race for Iowa, a national qualifier, and part of a midwest series of snowshoe races. Unfortunately, lack of snow reduced this to a sparsely attended trail race. That was too bad because the Hartman Preserve was an interesting location to race and with or without snow was a fun requiring some flexibility to negotiate many twists and turns and ups and downs!

Things Done Right:
Due to good early snow in December, I had been able to build a strong running base on the snowshoes. With a low-key approach to this race and the inability to run with the snowshoes, it became an enjoyable little trail race. A good faster-paced run in the woods.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much to grumble about with this one.

Any Other Stuff:
Even with a small turnout, there were some good runners present and some pretty brisk running!

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Rocky Raccoon 100 Mile - Huntsville State Park, TX — N. of Houston - February 4, 2006


Neal Taylor reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: Beat prior time of 20hr 25min
Results: 20hr 38min — close but no cigar!
Website: http://www.tejastrails.com/Rocky.html

General Summary:
Five 20 mile loops around a lake. My third running of this course. I don’t think it is fair to call this an “easy” course. In the 100 mile distance some courses are just “faster” than others. They are all HARD! The course does have plenty of challenges; the roots are great for tripping, the cold — yes cold and damp, and small hills that get bigger with each loop.

Things Done Right:
My pacing was good for my training. My laps felt good except for lap two. For some reason I felt horrible on this lap. I don’t really know why, my pace was still on track.

Things Done Wrong:
At midnight I sang “happy birthday” as loud as possible to Teresa, my wife & pacer. It is just WRONG for me to sing like that!

Any Other Stuff:
I have heard that the winner was just a few seconds off the WORLD record for 100 mile TRAIL. I haven’t figured out how to verify this. But, I can say it was a thrill to watch this guy running 100 miles so FAST!

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Teresa Taylor reports:
Distance: PACER for 20 miles of the 100 mile
Goal: Pace Neal for a 20 mile loop & assist in kitchen
Results: Success
Website: http://www.tejastrails.com/Rocky.html

General Summary:
This event is well run and a lot of fun to be a part of. Neal ran a good race and even though he ran out of leg a bit, he was still running when I picked him up for the last 20 miles. He had not been passed by anyone after 40 miles, and over the last 20 miles he passed a lot of lapped runners as well as folks on the final loop with him. He was strong enough to push to the finish and no one caught back up to him.

Things Done Right:
Neal said to push him hard, so I did! I felt like a wicked woman, but he said I was a gentle wicked woman! I tried to keep him at least shuffling and not walking, and he responded well. The last mile he really dug deep and pushed hard on very tired legs as we thought someone was catching us. He buried them, but I did not tell him that so he kept pushing! He sang Happy Birthday to me at the top of his lungs at midnight — how cool is that? I felt good the 20 miles, and had a great time pacing. It was the first time Neal and I have been able to run together since April when we moved to Barr Camp!

Things Done Wrong:
Things went well, nothing I can think of.

Any Other Stuff:
The race staff does a great job and they really take care of the runners and volunteers. This was the second time I worked in the kitchen for the 3 days of the event, and I really enjoy helping out and being a part of the weekend. They do a spaghetti dinner Friday night, food all weekend long for aid stations and volunteers, and a huge breakfast/brunch Sunday. I think most runners GAIN weight the weeekend of Rocky Raccoon!

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100+ miles
Goal: 24 hours
Results: 24:40:??
Website: http://www.tejastrails.com/Rocky.html

General Summary:
RR is a relatively flat course consisting of 5 loops. there are lots of roots. My goal was to break 24 hours, but I got lost for about 4 miles, so that didn’t happen.

Things Done Right:
Went out faster than normal, and took a flashlight. I didn’t get light for almost an hour. Kept everything simple. Wore tights throughout the race, even though it got up to 70 degrees or so, it got really cold at night and inot the wee hours of the morning. A lot of people wasted precious time changing cloths.

Things Done Wrong:
Had an inexperienced pacer, who I found myself worrying about. I found him to be a distraction more than a help, so next 100 miler I run I a not having a pacer.

Any Other Stuff:
Did I mention lots of roots? Otherwise it is well organized and planned, and a good first time 100 miler.

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Pemberton 50K - Fountain Hills, AZ - February 4, 2006


Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Run easy, use as a long training run — 5 hours
Results: Never pushed the pace
Website: http://www.trailrun.net

General Summary:
This race was used as a weekend long run in preparation for later longer runs in April, May and June

Things Done Right:
Went out at a very comfortable pace and felt good. The additional oxygen at this altitude comes at no additional charge and perhaps made me feel I was running slowly. Towards the end of the 1st loop I realized I ran a little faster than I had planned. I came in at 2:15, 10-15 minutes faster than planned; the second loop I felt good and did not push the final 5+ miles which is basically a slight downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t take enough beer along for after the run.

Any Other Stuff:
Good course, all trail and well organized. Nice weather in the upper 40’s to low 80’s


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Chilly Hilly - Near Martinsville, IN - January 21-21, 2006

Adam Feerst reports:
Distance: 5 races: 1mi — 10mi
Goal: Compete well. Get good high intensity training. Stay strong throughout. Stay warm.
Results: 4th overall; 4-4-5-4-4 in individual races. 1st master.
Website: http://www.hoosier200.com/chilihilly.htm

General Summary:
First, Indiana can be cold and wet in Jan. We lucked out. It was dry both days, 40s, and even sunny on Sat.

Race 1 was a 10k on Sat afternoon. One of IN top HS runners was off the front early. With five races, I didn’t want to go out too hard. I was 5th on the opening climb, with 6th on my heels. There’s a long, road downhill, about 1.5 mi into the first of two loops. I opened it up there (I’m a very good downhill runner), passing another HS runner to move into 4th, and closing on 3rd. Back in the trees, I tried to push to build the gap on 5th, and close on 3rd. By the time we were back at the long downhill, I had built a good lead on 5th, but saw that I had lost contact with 3rd.

Then, I started to think about strategy. How hard should I run? I wanted to make sure I had a good lead on 5th before the finish. Maybe I should pick it up and possibly catch 3rd. I didn’t want to run any harder than necessary, with four more races to go. Then, there’s also ego and time to deal with. They used cross-country scoring (place, not time).

So it would go throughout the weekend. Very similar dynamics at the front of each race; the top 3 finishers were the same. Similar questions of strategy.

Race 2 was at night, and on roads, with a steep descent at the start, and climb to the finish. It was supposed to be 4mi, but was more like 5k. I went out fast on the opening downhill. This time, I kept the 3rd place guy and the other HS runner close on the gradual uphill, and passed them coming back down. I went with him up the finishing hill, but just didn’t have the speed to take 3rd.

Sunday morning started with a 5k, a single reverse of the 10k loop. I was cold and stiff at the start. I let the other HS runner get too far ahead this time. I pushed hard up the hill, closing a bit, and pulling well away from 6th, but had given up too much to t bring him back.

The mid-morning race was 10mi. Having given up a point in the morning, placing mattered more in this one. Also, being the longest race, I thought I might have a better chance of finishing 3rd. After trailing 3rd by ~30 seconds after 2mi, I started to pick it up. I thought that I could close on some long downhills, but found myself 1:15 down by the turn around. I continued to push through some open meadows, but lost him in the trees. Again, there’s the dilemma of how hard to push. I was also very wet, after two stream crossings and muddy trails. I ran the last 3mi steady — not easy but not too hard. All alone, I slowed to a near walk up the steep finishing hill.

The final race was a mile, at noon. It has the same steep downhill start, followed by a longer, windy climb back to the finish. The placings at the top were pretty well set. On one hand, it was making sure I didn’t give up too many places. On the other, I wanted to give it all up on the last race. With my downhill ability, I lead at the bottom, about 500 yards. The first 3 went by as we started to climb. I went as hard as I could, but didn’t have the leg speed to keep up. I continued to push, and, with more endurance than speed, was surprised that I stayed well in 4th.

Things Done Right:
I was able to stay loose and efficiently fueled throughout. I had Endurox R4 immediately after every race. I ate light at dinner. Many others commented on eating too much, and feeling dinner on the night race. I saved the bigger calories for a late night snack. How and when you eat is important in stage races. Lodging and meals were included in the entry.

It was great training. It’s been a little over a year since my last ultra, but after 3+ years of running them, I’m still trying to get back some speed. This is the kind of higher intensity training I need, and it was on hills. I’m still sore 3 days later. I guess that means I have to do more of this kind of training.

Things Done Wrong:
Perhaps I should have gone out with the 3rd place runner in every race. In hindsight, I don’t think I had the speed to beat him anyway, but I only gave myself a chance in the night race and mile.

Any Other Stuff:
Fun event. Everyone was friendly — runners and staff.

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34th Annual Houston-Chevron Marathon - Houston, Texas - January 15, 2006

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Under 4:30
Results: 4:18:09
Website: http://www.hphoustonmarathon.com/

General Summary:
City-wide course, starting and finishing in downtown Houston.

Things Done Right:
Realized current level of conditioning by 4th mile, adjusted pace accordingly, and was able to maintain through the finish ... last 22 miles evenly paced!

Things Done Wrong:
None during the race ... could have prepared better in the weeks leading up!

Any Other Stuff:
Predominantly flat course with lots of concrete. Well organized. Weather started cool but got warm the last half; sunny & humid; 40’s at the start — 60’s at the end.

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PF Chiangs Rock & Roll Arizona Marathon - Phoenix, AZ - January 15, 2006

James Cannon reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: 4:00
Results: 4:17
Website: http://www.rnraz.com

General Summary:
Race course was flat through the streets of Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Tempe, Arizona. The combined registered participation of the full and half marathons was around 33k with around 8k marathon finishers and 18k half marathon finishers. Fortunately, the marathon and half marathon were run on different courses.

Things Done Right:
Decided to do the race. Yes it was a big race run on pavement, but it was a great mid winter break. Plus the side trip to Sedona was fabulous (think a mini Moab).

Things Done Wrong:
Did not train on pavement. This was a very wrong move!!! After the half way point, the pounding from the pavement took a heavy toll. The last half was very ugly.

Any Other Stuff:
I saw quite a few ICers there. Looks like others were looking for a break as well.

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Christa Lloyd reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Qualify for Boston (3:40)
Results: 3:19.33, 1st female 18-24
Website: http://www.rnraz.com

General Summary:
Flat course, beautiful weather, and LOW elevation made this a great race! This was only my second marathon, and the bands and cheerleaders along the course really kept my mind occupied, not to mention all the green plants and flowers everywhere. Quite a change from snowy Colorado! The evening concert rounded out the day, too--Overall tons of fun and I highly recommend it!

Things Done Right:
I think living & training at 7700 feet elevation had something to do with it...
I alternated between water and energy drinks at the aid stations, and had a Clif shot at miles 10 and 19, which seemed to be the perfect times to keep me from bonking. I started off conservatively, then picked it up when I still felt good at the 10k point, and ran my second half about two minutes faster than the first.

Things Done Wrong:
I got sick about two weeks before the race and wasn’t able to get a quality long run in, so I did a tough 15-miler the weekend before the race (windy, icy, hilly conditions... yuk). I think I could have had a more consistent training schedule, too. But I really can’t complain about my race!

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Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3.45
Results: 3.49
Website: http://www.rnraz.com

General Summary:
A very flat course that goes through Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tempe. The course is lined with bands playing, which adds a good distraction in the beginning but the loud music was a bit annoying on the last miles. The scenic surroundings of the valley can be seen from the course. The weather was good and relatively cold for Phoenix. :)

Things Done Right:
Stayed on pace using my GPS. Hydrated at ate GU consistently and ignored everything else that was served.

Things Done Wrong:
I decided to go up to my final, faster pace too early. Should have waited a few more miles. I hit the wall the last miles and lost sight of my goal. Oh well, next time.

Any Other Stuff:
This course is really flat and fast. Low altitude and comfortable weather makes this a good course for PR.

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Calico 50km and 30km - Calico Ghost Town CA - January 15, 2006


Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 30km
Goal: finish
Results: 4:31:00

General Summary:
This is a really good, scenic, tough 50km and 30km. Starts and finishes in a ghost town, which is kind of neat.

Things Done Right:
Switched to the 30km instead of the 50km. Running 50 miles the day before, and driving a total of 6 hours in the LA area, plus two hours on a boat filled with hyper teenagers the day before, then turning around and waking up at 4:30 in the morning left me a little drained for the 50km. All the wind in CA must have decided to go to Calico, and there was lots of dirt and dust in the air. Free micro-dermabrasion for all the runners!

Things Done Wrong:
Switched to the 30k. I felt like a woosie.

Any Other Stuff:
A good race, although the stupid dirt bikes and ATV’s kicked up lots of dust, and were all around very irritating.

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Avalon 50 mile run - Catalina Island, CA - January 14, 2006

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: 10 hours
Results: 10:07:00 (about)
Website: http://avalon50.com

General Summary:
The Avalon 50 mile is run on the very hilly and beautiful Catalina Island off the coast of Long Beach CA. About 20 miles of pavement, and the rest it on dirt roads.

Things Done Right:
Took a flashlight to the start! The first hour was dark, despite a glowing full moon. This helped me to go out faster since I finally figured out after nearly seven years of ultrarunning you can run faster when you can see the trail. I also watched for buffalo, which live on the island. If you should decide to run this race, I wouldn’t wear red. Even if red is your favorite color, favorite shirt, or power color that aligns your chakras with the universe, red is not a good color to wear when you are running amongst buffalo. One charged a woman wearing a bright red shirt. Good thing her shorts weren’t red! (she was unharmed, just shaken) I took in plenty of calories, and had a good time with friends, and was able to take the early boat over to Long Beach to run another race the next morning.

Things Done Wrong:
Had too much baggage. It was calling for lots of rain and thunderstorms, so I carried all kinds of rain gear. Turned out I needed none of it, as it only misted heavily. With 100 % humidity and 60 degree temperatures, and no wind, nobody really needed a rain coat, so there were lots of runners with all kinds of cloths hanging off them throughout the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Driving 3 hours in the LA area was more taxing than running 50 miles.

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Fat Ass 50k - Harrisburg, PA - January 1, 2006


Mike Sandlin reports:
Distance: 50k
Goal: Finish
Results: 4:07:25 (1st place overall)

General Summary:
Due to health issues, I did not run any races in 2005, so this was a big challenge for me both mentally and physically. After gaining about 10 pounds and losing any mental toughness I had, this was a test to see if I am moving in the right direction to recovery. The race was run on dirt roads with rolling hills. After training in Manitou Springs and Victor (our summer home) for the past two weeks, I felt very strong. I was running in fifth place for the first half of the race and then starting moving up in the order of runners during the last ten miles. I took the lead with three miles to go and felt pretty strong during the final miles.

Things Done Right:
Started running slow and gradually increased my pace.

Things Done Wrong:
I was worried that I started too slow; however, the second half of the race I felt strong and passed the runners who were in front of me.

Any Other Stuff:
Glad to see that I might be on the right track to recovery and looking forward to so really good training with my fellow ICERS this summer. I thought of all my summer runs with the club, which made me feel mentally strong.

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Rescue Run - Palmer Park - January 1st, 2006


Kevin Kinney reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: Wake up in time to run
Results: 1:07:09
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/results/2006_results/2006_rescue_run_10k.htm

General Summary:
Weak showing, but lots of room for improvement

Things Done Right:
Woke up

Things Done Wrong:
Not sure

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Bruce Barrell reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: 45 min
Results: 45:55

General Summary:
Greetings Race Fans and fellow ICers, and Happy New Year to you all!! This is my first report as a new member of the IC, and first time running both this venue and the race. Sunday morning was brisk, with fairly steady breezes and very cool temperatures. If you like races that are a mix of pavement and hard-packed dirt/gravel, then this course is for you.

In the first mile or so, we faced a steady uphill, never very steep, but for someone like me that didn’t get in much of a warm-up, it got my heart pounding in a hurry! After about a mile and a half (?), the 5k runners veered to the left and we 10kers continued on a rolling loop to the right, with nice views of the mountains. This course really varied, with the wind alternately in your face and at your back; out in the open and sometimes hidden by the trees and/or hillsides. The crowd thinned out quickly as we got to the first dirt path section and my need for an EMT subsided. Water stops were few, but given the weather and distance, you really didn’t need to rehydrate much any way. Friendly volunteers — THANKS, GUYS!!!

Great shirt; not much in the way of finish line goodies, but a friendly crowd overall.

Nice training run, and I suspect I’ll be back next year.

Things Done Right:
Pre-race nutrition — strong coffee and two slices of toast with peanut butter and jam two hours before race time — seemed to be right on the money; I also topped it off with a shot of Hammer gel and a shot of water half an hour before hand and my stomach felt great during the race.

Two days before the race, I did a 20 minute bike followed by 30 minutes of intervals on a treadmill and this definitely seemed to help keep my leg speed up. I plan on doing intervals and tempo runs consistently into the summer.... these road/trail runs really show you the need for speed work now and then.

Things Done Wrong:
... along with the great treadmill workout, I followed it with two sets each of leg raises and leg curls, then some upper body weights.... having not lifted for some time, this was dumb if I expected to race a good time; my legs were a little sore and felt really heavy — yikes! Fortunately, this was just a ‘speed workout’ — okay, all things are relative!!

Any Other Stuff:
Palmer Park: this was my first time running here (I’ve only lived in the area since last spring) and overall, it was very nice... this would be a great place for training runs. I just wish more of the run had been on the dirt/gravel paths. Small critique, because overall this was a good course for a 10k.

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Dale Schauer reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: to finish under 1 hour
Results: 58.30

General Summary:
I accomplished my goal, despite a very slow and uphill first 3 miles. It was a great way to begin the New Year! My ski muscles were a bit confused with the run today since they had been in charge the previous five days in a row up at Winter Park, Co.

Things Done Right:
Showing up, staying hydrated, and finishing very strong. I used the heart rate monitor and stayed at a good average for me, 142.

Things Done Wrong:
Caring too much Holiday weight up those hills. I may have started my sprint to the finish a bit too early, as I was able to reel in everyone I had in my sights but fellow incline cluber John O’donnell :) who saw me and took off the last 100 yards!

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Scott Suter reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 55min
Results: 50:36

General Summary:
Good weather to race and start the year off right.

Things Done Right:
Got up and made it out of the house.

Things Done Wrong:
I pushed it a little too hard and my hip is back to hurting. I took off the last month and a half in hopes it would get better.

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Kate Raphael reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: finish under an hour
Results: 59:05

General Summary:
Windy, but otherwise perfect weather. Good support. Fun race as usual.

Things Done Right:
For once, I was dressed appropriately. Paced myself well and achieved negative splits every mile.

Things Done Wrong:
Hadn’t been able to run for two weeks, but did get some bicycle workouts in.

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Brent Sheffield reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 1:00
Results: 57:32
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/

General Summary:
This was the first time I have run this race. I did okay considering that I didn’t know the course and really didn’t know what to expect.

Things Done Right:
Ran steady, even effort through the whole race. I beat the time I was hoping to get so I was happy about that.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t really train at all leading up to the race. I only avg. about two runs a week since the Pike’s Peak Marathon. Ate a bunch of junk the night before so I felt very sluggish and heavy.

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Keith Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 55min
Results: 54:11, 21/42 in age group

General Summary:
I think this was the nicest weather we’ve had in a while--t-shirt & shorts. Ran about as expected since I have not been putting many miles in this fall/winter.

Things Done Right:
Just kept a comfortable pace and saved a bit for the final couple hundred yards.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing much--other than I should not have slacked off so much since the PPM.

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: under 1.0 hr.
Results: 58:27
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/

General Summary:
Good day for a race the weather was good compared to past years.

Things Done Right:
none

Things Done Wrong:
none

Any Other Stuff:
just for fun and see how training is coming along.

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Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Beat Lee Moss
Results: He didn’t show
Website: http://pprrun.org

General Summary:
I was about 10 seconds slower than last year (46:04 vs. 45:54), but since Lee Moss didn’t show up, I had little incentive to go any faster. My 6-yr old daughter ran the one-mile race and she didn’t have to walk any part of the course (it was her first race). It was an awesome experience to run it with her and she was completely pumped because she got a cookie at the end.

Things Done Right:
Had my last drink at 11PM and was in bed by 1AM.

Things Done Wrong:
I could feel the beginnings of a calf cramp on the final downhill, so I had to hold back near the end. It’s a good thing Lee Moss didn’t show up because he probably would have smoked me in the last mile.

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Larry DeWitt reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: See how slow I am
Results: 41:48/9th Overall
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/

General Summary:
First 10K in a long long time. Ribs hurt afterward from breathing so hard. Fun course, and a great way to start the year!

Things Done Right:
Didn’t start out too fast and finished strong.

Things Done Wrong:
I would say rode my bike 96 miles the day before, but I did much better than I thought I would, so I guess it wasn’t wrong.

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Glen Ash reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 50 min
Results: 51:21

General Summary:
Great weather, wearing shorts in Jan.is OK. A welcome breeze after an uphill first mile.

Things Done Right:
A well organized race and thanks to the volunteers.

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe the steak on New Years eve was the wrong thing to eat, but----

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Martina Ritchie reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: ...to finish
Results: finished.

General Summary:
Just a note to say I ran the 10K. See you Sunday. Martina Ritchie

Things Done Right:
I started out slow to get my legs warmed up and then accelerated

Things Done Wrong:
--nothing

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Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Under one hour
Results: 59:32

General Summary:
Weather nice, especially for January, although very strong winds up on the Masa. The usual first class organization, prompt results and awards ceremony, and tons of S & R folk there to inspire the runners.

Things Done Right:
Went to bed early! Went easy on the liquid celebrations

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t warm up enough, due to participation in the “Toddler Trot” with my twins. However, how can I do better than that?

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Gahlen Crawford reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 1:15
Results: 1:13:05
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/

General Summary:
Nice race

Things Done Right:
Ran with my daughter

Things Done Wrong:
Never ran course

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Rachel Crawford reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 1:15
Results: 1:13:04
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/

General Summary:
Nice race

Things Done Right:
Ran with my dad

Things Done Wrong:
Never ran course before

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Cathy Dilts reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: finish
Results: finished

General Summary:
I planned on doing the Rescue Run 5K with a group of friends and family, but decided to run the 10K at the last minute. Part of the motivation was to finally have something to report!

Things Done Right:
I have been training. At a low level, perhaps, but better than typical for the holiday season.

Things Done Wrong:
My socks kept wrinkling up, and I think I should have worn a different pair of shoes. Also, I was not prepared for the steep hill — more training on hills!

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John Mills reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Under 1 hr
Results: 57:30

General Summary:
Great benefit race for the El Paso S&R. Scenic and challenging. Lots of prize give aways.

Things Done Right:
Train with the IC.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much.

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Trish McCormick reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: To finish, I was obligated to party the night before.
Results: 1:10:09
Website: http://www.pprrun.org/results/2006_results/2006_rescue_run_10k.htm

General Summary:
It was a beautiful morning and the view was wonderful. I was somewhat distracted by the view, and might have lollygagged a bit.
The roads and trails were perfect.
Pretty good turn out — great benefit to SAR.

Things Done Right:
Showed up and ran the 10K.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough sleep, only a catnap before the run.
May have to nix party next year.

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Tucson Marathon - Tucson, AZ - December 4, 2005

Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:17
Results: 3:16:37
Website: http://www.tucsonmarathon.com/

General Summary:
Perfect marathon weather conditions. Sunny starting temperature
was about 40 degrees. Finishing temperature was about 55 degrees. No wind.
As the racers warmed up, they shed hats, gloves, shirts, windbreakers, etc.
This is a fast downhill course dropping about 2300 feet fairly uniformly
over the 26.2 miles.

Things Done Right:
I trained properly for the race and had a good prediction of my
finishing time.

Things Done Wrong:
I got just a little greedy and ran most of the race at a pace for a
3:12 time. I lost a minute/mile the last four miles.

Any Other Stuff:
My quads (and calves) were trashed at the end of the race.
Mile 25 was the toughest mile. Each time my foot hit the pavement, my leg
was shocked with pain. My recovery period was the longest for any race.


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High Desert Ultra 50km - Ridgecrest, CA - December 4, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: break 5 hours
Results: 5:02:52
Website: http://othtc.com

General Summary:
This 50km is a well-organized 50km in the Mojave desert. My goal was to break 5 hours, however, a wise man once said something to the affect that if you reach all your goals, then you are setting them to low.

Things Done Right:
Went out harder than usual, and was able to keep up my pace until the last 2 miles. Didn’t spend more than a minute at any of the aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran an incredibly tough race the week before. I also got dehydrated because the water tasted funny, and I didn’t want to drink it, as it was upsetting my stomach. I ended up in the bushes for about 5 minutes, which along with being tired from last weeks adventure race, cost me my sub-5 hours goal. Oh well. Something to work towards.

Any Other Stuff:


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Rock Canyon Half Marathon - Pueblo, CO - December 3, 2005

Connilee Walter reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: Good day, no snow: break 1:30
Results: 1:33:07 (my watch)
Website: http://www.socorunners.org

General Summary:
Based on a recent 5k, I really thought I would be able to break 1:30 in this race. As we drove down to Pueblo in a snowstorm, I quickly realized this would not happen (but of course was optimistic that Pueblo would miraculously be sunny, and the trails would be clear! HA!). Anyhoo, despite snow and slush and nasty cramped calves, eeked out a 1:33 and change, fourth overall woman. It was an incredibly gorgeous day; with lots of fresh snow hugging the trees and prettying the landscape.

Things Done Right:
At the last minute, I was debating running pants vs. shorts. I ended up opting for running pants and I am glad I did; my legs needed the extra warmth. Paced well.

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t do anything about the weather; and I was fine with readjusting my time goal. But something I could control was mental preparation; one mistake I made was that I was not as mentally prepared for this race as I should have been.

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Santa Barbara 9 Trails - Santa Barbara, CA - November 26th, 2005

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 35 miles
Goal: 10 hours
Results: 11:50
Website: http://allwedoisrun.com

General Summary:
The SB9T was advertised to be “runnable,” however, 10,000' of climbing and descending on technical terrain made this nearly impossible for me. The race was run on 9 separate trails along coastal trails in SB.

Things Done Right:
Took it very easy, since I wanted to run another race the next weekend. Took in lots of calories and fluids. Didn’t step in the sulfur springs as I was crawling through the bamboo tunnel, or hit my head on the metal pipes over head. I also learned to rappel, as there was a large portion of the trail that was washed away.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran what downhill sections I could. My quads were so sore I couldn’t run for three days.

Any Other Stuff:
Not a good first time ultra.

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