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2007 Incline Club Race Reports

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Pueblo Rock Canyon Half Marathon — Pueblo, CO — December 2, 2006
Tecumseh Trail Marathon — Bloomington, Indiana — December 2, 2006
California International Marathon — Sacramento, CA — December 3, 2006
Sunmart 50 mile ultramarathon — Huntsville State Park TX — December 9, 2006
Otter Creek Trail Marathon — Brandenburg, Kentucky — December 10, 2006
Trail Dawgs Phunt run — Fair Hill, Maryland — January 6, 2007
Avalon 50 mile — Avalon, CA Catalina Island — January 13, 2007
Bandera 100k — Hill Country State Park, Texas — January 13, 2007
Calico 50km — Calico, CA — January 14, 2007
P.F. Chang’s Rock’n’Roll Arizona Marathon — Phoenix, AZ — January 14, 2007
Carlsbad 1/2 Marathon — Carlsbad, Ca — January 21, 2007
1st Annual City of Angels Half Marathon — Los Angeles, CA — Dec. 3, 2006
Holualoa Tucson Marathon — Tucson, AZ — December 10, 2006
Christianson Trail Race — Phoenix, AZ - January 7, 2007
P.F. Chang’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Arizona Marathon — Phoenix — January 14, 2007
35th Annual Houston-Chevron Marathon — Houston, Texas — January 14, 2007
Tonto Fun Run — Cave Creek, AZ — January 28, 2007
Rocky Raccoon 100 — Huntsville State Park TX — February 3 & 4 - 2 reports
New World Snowshoe Championship — Oak Forest Center, (between Luck and Frederic, Wisconsin). — February 10, 2007
The Pueblo Chieftain’s 29th Annual 10 mile — Pueblo — March 4, 2007
Lakewood Mug Run 10K — Lakewood, CA (not CO) — March 10, 2007
Screamin Snowman 10K — Eldora, Co — February 11, 2007
Bi-Lo Myrtle Beach Marathon — Myrtle Beach, South Carolina — February 17, 2007
Mardi Gras 1/2 Marathon — New Orleans, LA — February 25, 2007
Old Pueblo 50 mile Endurance run — Soniota, AZ — March 3, 2007
Barcelona Marathon — Barcelona, Spain — March 4, 2007
Carl Touchstone Memorial 50 mile — DeSoto National Forest, Laurel MS — March 10, 2007
2007 U.S. National Snowshoe Championships — Maple Grove, MN — March 10, 2007
Catalina Marathon — Santa Catalina Island, Avalon, CA — March 17, 2007 - 2 reports
Run Through Time (Turret) Marathon — Salida, Colorado — March 17, 2007 - 6 reports
Roma Marathon — Rome Italy — March 18, 2007
Bataan Memorial Death March — White Sands Missile Range, NM — March 25, 2007
Platte River Half Marathon — Littleton, Colorado — April 1, 2007 - 5 reports
Umstead 100 ultramarathon — Umstead State Park, NC — March 31 - April 1, 2007
Rockin K Trail Runs — Kanopolis State Park, Kansas — April 07, 2007
Greenland Trail 25K — Greenland Open Space, Larkspur, CO — April 14, 2007 - 3 reports
Greenland Trail 50K — Greenland Open Space, Larkspur, CO — April 14, 2007 - 4 reports
Horsetooth Half Marathon — Fort Collins — April 15, 2007
Boston Marathon — Boston — April 16, 2007 - 3 reports
Springs Desert Ultra — Fruita Colorado — April 21, 2007
Copper Crawl 13K — Miami, AZ — April 22, 2007
Free State Trail Runs (26.2m/40m/100k) — Lawrence, Kansas — April 28, 2007
Pine Line Marathon — Medford, WI — April 28, 2007
Big Sur International Marathon — Carmel, CA — April 29, 2007
Collegiate Peaks Trail Run 25 Miler — Buena Vista, CO — May 05, 2007 - 7 reports
Collegiate Peaks Trail Run 50 Miler — Buena Vista, CO — May 05, 2007 - 4 reports
Pilot Knob Trail Race — Forest City, Iowa / Pilot Knob State Park — May 5, 2007
Colorado Mini Marathon — Fort Collins — May 6, 2007
Crimestoppers Azalea Run 10K — Savannah, GA — May 12, 2007
Bishop High Sierra 50 mile ultramarathon — Bishop, CA — May 19, 2007
Colorado Colfax 1/2 Marathon — Denver — May 20, 2007
Medicine Bow 1/2 Marathon — Lincoln Memorial, Laramie Summit, I-80, Wy — May 27 2007
Madison Marathon — Madison, WI — May 27, 2007
Rocky Mountain Double marathon — Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming — May 27, 2007
Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run — Orem UT — June 2, 2007
Kettle Moraine 100 Mile Endurance Run — Kettle Moraine State Park, Wisconsin — June 2-3, 2007
Casper Marathon — Casper Wyoming — June 3, 2007
San Diego Rock & Roll Marathon — San Diego CA — June 03, 2007
Cytomax 10K Trail Run Championship — Vail, CO — June 3, 2007
Deadwood Mickelson Trail Marathon — Deadwood, SD — June 3, 2007
Garden of the Gods 10M — Colorado Springs — June 10, 2007 - 13 reports
Bighorn 100 — Dayton, Wyoming — June 15, 2007
Santa Cruz Mtns. Trail Run — Santa Cruz, CA — June 16, 2007
Mt Evans Ascent — Idaho Springs, CO — June 16, 2007 - 8 reports
Lake City 50 — San Juan Summer Solstice 50 — Lake City Colorado — June 16, 2007 - 4 reports
Bighorn 50K — Dayton, Wyoming — June 16, 2007.
Bighorn 50 miler — Dayton, Wyoming — June 16, 2007 - 2 reports
Bighorn Mountain Wild and Scenic Trail Run — Dayton, WY — June 15, 2007
Estes Park Marathon — Estes Park, CO — June 17, 2007
Slacker Half Marathon — Loveland Ski area to Georgetown — June 23, 2007
Double Dipsea — Stinson Beach California — June 23
Race for the Mountains — Breckenridge, CO — June 24, 2007
Double Trouble 15 & 30k — French Creek State Park, PA — June 24, 2007
Ironman Coeur d’Alene — Coeur d’Alene, ID — June 24, 2007
Run With the Devil 50 miler — Henderson, Nevada — June 30, 2007
Mt. Marathon Race — Seward Alaska — July 4, 2007 - 2 reports
Leadville Heavy Half Marathon (15.5M) — Leadville, CO — July 7, 2007
Leadville Trail Marathon — Leadville, Colorado — July 7, 2007
Summer Roundup — Bear Creek Park, Colo Spgs — July 8, 2007 - 12 reports
Barr Trail Mountain Race — Manitou Spgs, CO — July 15, 2007 - 15 reports
High Mountain 25K & 50 km Trail Run — Leadville, CO — July 15, 2007
High Mountain 50K — Leadville, CO — July 15, 2007
USAF Academy Half Marathon — Santa Fe Trail on USAF Academy — July 21, 2007
Badwater 135 Ultramarathon — Badwater, Death Valley, CA — July 23-24, 2007
Grand Island Trail Marathon — Grand Island, Michigan Upper Peninsula — July 28, 2007
Wild West Relay — Fort Collins, CO to Steamboat Springs, CO — August 3-4, 2007 - 2 reports
Pikes Peak Ascent — Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO — August 18, 2007 - 11 reports
Pikes Peak Marathon — Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO — August 19, 2007 - 12 reports
Pikes Peak Double — Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO — August 18-19, 2007 - 2 reports
Leadville 100 — Leadville, CO — August 18-19, 2007 - 3 reports

View 2006 race reports


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Pueblo Rock Canyon Half Marathon — Pueblo, CO — December 2, 2006

Trish McCormick reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2:24
Results: 2:32
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/results/RockCanyon2006.htm

General Summary:
The ride down was treacherous, slick, slick, slick, had no idea this could be any sort of omen. Pueblo was cold and it was still snowing. The trail was primarily flat, but slick with loose rocks(also covered with a thin layer of ice) scattered here and there.

Things Done Right:
I think running in the fall series was helpful. In the fall series, the third run — the trail was challenging and the last run included some bad weather.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough “bad” weather and balance training — had such a hard time with slipping and remaining vertical.
No yaktrax-- but I think that might have been dishonorable.

Any Other Stuff:
Beautiful scenery, too bad I had to keep my head down most of the time.

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Tecumseh Trail Marathon — Bloomington, Indiana — December 2, 2006

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:30
Results: 3:47
Website: http://www.dinoseries.com/run/schedule/2006/marathon.htm

General Summary:
Dashing through the forest along leaf-covered mostly single track trails, countless stream crossings, log hopping, up and down hill after hill after hill, suffering three falls with soft landings on leaves. It was a lot of fun for about two and a half hours — the trail wore me out by then though but I kept going anyway to finish in 3:47:00, which was good enough to win my age group and place 34th overall. Winning time was 3:16.

It rained solid on Thursday resulting in overfilled creeks and causing course officials to make last minute on the fly course changes prior to the race start at 1030 on Saturday morning. We ended up running about four miles on roads about half way into the course in order to avoid a one lane bridge that was well under water. Race day was cold, with high temperatures in the 20’s but it was mostly sunny. I wore tights and long tech shirt and never felt the need to take off my gloves nor my wool hat.

It’s a great race and was one of the 50 marathons in 50 days that Dean Karnazes (author of Ultramarathon Man) ran. Bloomington is vibrant university town with a variety of ethnic restaurants. Friday I enjoyed Tibetan food at the Snow Lion restaurant and Saturday night I savored Afghanistan cuisine at the Samira Restaurant. One could spend weeks in that town eating a different country’s food every night.

My 80th lifetime marathon and 42nd marathon state. Next on the docket is the obscure Otter Creek Trail Marathon near Louisville, Kentucky (state #43) next Sunday, Dec 10th.

Things Done Right:
Kept running. Didn’t walk.

Dressed warmly enough to avoid hypothermia.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably started off too fast. I guess I’ll never learn... after 80 marathons I should know better!

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California International Marathon — Sacramento, CA — December 3, 2006

Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: <3.10 (Qualify for Boston)
Results: 3.09.45 (I DID IT!)
Website: http://www.runcim.org

General Summary:
A friend of mine convinced me to run this race with him in an attempt to qualify for Boston. To do that I had to cut off 40 minutes from my PR! I did a lot of speed training and trusted that sea level running would give me an extra push. The extra speed training paid off and sea level running is awesome for sure. I managed to finish within my goal and I am still amazed that I did it. :) I think this PR will stay around for a long, long time.

Things Done Right:
- Hydrated well before and during the race.
- Ate energy gel every 30 minutes.
- Stayed with the race provided 3.10 pace team which made it easier to fight off the mental tiredness 20+ miles into the race.
- Ate well the week before the race with lots of carbs.

Things Done Wrong:
Traveled too early on Saturday which disturbed my sleep and I was tired Saturday night. Did not sleep well the night before the race. I almost thought I had spoiled my race at that point.

Any Other Stuff:
The race organizer call this “the fastest course in the west.” It is fast with rolling hills and one bigger hill. The course has a net elevation loss of 300 feet. Add to this that the weather was perfect. 40 degrees, sunshine and hardly any wind. Volunteers were yelling out pace times at many of the mile markers and there were bands playing along the course. The organizers should stretch out the aid stations a little bit because they caused a slow down and confusion among runners.

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Sunmart 50 mile ultramarathon — Huntsville State Park TX — December 9, 2006

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: under 9 hours
Results: 8:46:08
Website: http://www.sunmart.net

General Summary:
This very rooty, ankle twisting course consisted of 4 loops. Perfect weather made for a lot of PR’s for a lot of runners.

Things Done Right:
Ran hard my first loop, saved something for the last loop. Ate my usual ultramarathon fare of Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme Pies, and Carb Boom, and water. E-Caps kept me from cramping, but not from cussing about the roots. Didn’t over eat or hydrate, and felt great. Set a PR by 50 minutes

Things Done Wrong:
Turned my ankle bad on the first loop. Cussed too much. Couldnd’t see well due to dust getting on my contacts, but it was too overcast for sunglasses. Being able to see the trails would have helped me run faster.

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Otter Creek Trail Marathon — Brandenburg, Kentucky — December 10, 2006

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:47
Results: 3:39
Website: http://www.headfirstperformance.com/TrailMarathon/Otter Creek.htm

General Summary:
Otter Creek Trail Marathon
Brandenburg, Kentucky
Dec 10th, 2006
Steve Bremner
Marathon State 43, total marathons 81

This is the first time I’ve run marathons in back to back weekends. Prior to this the closest time in between marathons has been two weeks. Recovery from trail marathons is almost instantaneous so I didn’t have much apprehension running this race one week after the Tecumseh Trail Marathon in Indiana on December 2nd. Indeed, I didn’t even find out about this race until about three days before Tecumseh, whereupon I quickly bought a plane ticket and signed up for the race since KY was a needed state in my 50-state quest and nowadays I always run trail marathons when given the choice.

I flew in to Louisville on Saturday, picked up a rental (First time driving a PT Cruiser), and cruised on down to my reservation on Fort Knox (45 minute drive). After checking in I headed on out to the commissary where I found some Amy’s organic TV dinners for the micro and a banana for the morning. Conveniently Fort Knox is right next to Otter Creek Park, so the next morning I only had a 15 minute drive to the race. As an Air Force retiree, anytime I can stay on a military installation I do so. They are as clean and quiet as any Hilton and the price is right-Fort Knox was $44/nt.

Race start was a tad on the cold side (30F), but after a couple miles I was glad I was wearing just a tech top and shorts. We started off with a 2.2 mile loop, then commenced with the first of three 8-mile loops. Though I started off in an easy lope, no one wanted to run with me so right away I opened up a 100 yard lead. At the 2.2 mile point I couldn’t see anyone behind me. Could this be the makings of a runaway race?

It didn’t take long before the slower of the 8 milers and the 16 mile racers started coming back. Though I would yell “on your left” as I passed there was contact on occasion with the IPoders. I can’t understand why people listen to music when they run. It would drive me crazy. There is enough to keep track of out there in the wilderness.

I would get to know this 8-mile loop intimately over the next three hours, but the first time through was spectacular. Rolling terrain through deciduous forest over leaf-covered single track trail, followed by a precipitous drop to Otter Creek which we followed for some time before an aide station about halfway through the loop. Then we climbed up to a bluff where we had a scenic overlook of the Ohio River which forms the border between Indiana and Kentucky. The broad bends of the river with farmland and forest were a welcome sight on the next two times around the loop. From there we had a bit more climbing before it mostly leveled off moving to the end of the loop. A Russian guy caught up to me at this point, 10.2 miles into the race and we ran together for about 5 miles after which he slowly left me in his wake. A couple miles later another guy passed me, but for the last ten or so miles I ran alone, occasionally passing the odd 16-mile racers and towards the end probably lapping some marathoners. I ran the first 8-mile lap in an hour, second in 1:05, and third in 1:16, for a total time of 3:39, for 3rd place overall. Winning time was 3:32, second place was 3:35.

Little did I know that I should have held some in reserve for my airport connection in Chicago. They had delayed our flight due to a back up of planes in the air over Chicago and by the time I got off the plane and was in the terminal it was 7:33 PM. My flight to COS was on time and leaving at 7:50. That meant I had 7 minutes to make it from terminal 1 to terminal 3 — normally a 20-minute walk or more. With a heavy pack I did my best to simulate a jog arriving at the gate at 7:42. Flight closed, door locked, no sympathy. I was forced to spend the night in Chicago.

Things Done Right:
Stayed upright most of the time. Only fell three times.

Things Done Wrong:
Stepped in the creek early on.

Any Other Stuff:
Four star recommendation. This is one of the best trail marathons you can run in the east.

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Trail Dawgs Phunt run — Fair Hill, Maryland — January 6, 2007

Chandra Lloyd reports:
Distance: 20k
Goal: Finish
Results: 2h 33min
Website: http://www.udel.edu/johnmack/traildawgs/phunt_07.htm

General Summary:
This was officially a 50k “fun run,” with 42k and 20k options for us mortals. It had been raining for two days beforehand, so although we were blessed with 70 degree weather there were some killer mud puddles to splash through- we were coated up to our thighs by the finish. It took place in Fair Hill park in eastern Maryland, usually mostly equestrian and mountain bikes. The race was very laid back, based on the honor system, so we just signed in at the start and then wrote in our time when we finished.

Things Done Right:
Dressed lightly - it was WARM! - and started with absolutely no high expectations for time. The mud slowed us down a lot.

Things Done Wrong:
Wore new socks- should have worn old ones so I could just throw them away afterwards!

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Avalon 50 mile — Avalon, CA Catalina Island — January 13, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: under 10 hours
Results: 9:16:25
Website: http://www.avalon50.com

General Summary:
After a particularly rough holiday season, I was pulling at the bit to get the #*!# out of dodge, and do some serious running/training for some future races. The Avalon 50 miler on a island in the Pacific and Calico 50km in the middle of the Mojave desert, done back to back, was a nice change of venue. Watching the dolphins playfully jumping alongside the boat that shipped us out to the island was a good omen of what was to come.

Things Done Right:
Hammered up the endless hills on this beautiful island. Chicked lots of men. Finished in the top ten women. Gossiped, (AFTER the race) with my SoCal ultra-girlfriends about which was better, collagen or restylen, {restylen} and many other important related things. Went shopping after the race. Set a PR of over 45 minutes on this course.

Things Done Wrong:
Wish I had on my running skirt when chicking those men, instead of my frumpy tights. But it was cold! It snowed, yes snowed, on the island during the race. I remember thinking how great it was escaping the snow here in Colorado, only to find that once again Mother Nature will always have the last laugh.

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Bandera 100k — Hill Country State Park, Texas — January 13, 2007

Melissa Heggen reports:
Distance: 100k
Goal: to finish!
Results: 14:22

General Summary:
An incredible race put on by wonderful people. The sound of the location is misleading — this is a Texas race that even Coloradoans would enjoy. Technical, LOTS of rocks, very steep climbs. The course is a 50k loop, the 100k runners do the loop twice. This year the weather didn’t cooperate — rain the day before left the flatter parts of the course covered in a sticky mud resulting in 30 pound clumps the size of beach balls clinging to the bottom of each foot. The first half of the run was warm and humid, the second half suddenly became cold and rainy. Thanks to the tough skin I’ve built up running through the snow with the IC, I thought the weather made the race all the more exciting!

Things Done Right:
Went in prepared for ANYTHING. My drop bags had supplies to deal with any unexpected disaster, and the large time-goal window I gave myself kept me calm even when I quickly realized that I was going to be running a lot longer than planned due to the weather. I’m also familiar with this course, which helped enormously.

Things Done Wrong:
Honestly, the race couldn’t have gone any better than it did! The only thing I did wrong was stopping by Sonic immediately after finishing and snarfing down a cheeseburger, onion rings, and shake. Stomach wasn’t ready to handle it, sick for the rest of the night.

Any Other Stuff:
It’s very useful to explore the course before running this race. The trail changes significantly throughout the loop and it was helpful to always have an idea of what was coming up. Also, I was very glad that I wore a pair of knee-highs (cool pink and green ones!) with the feet cut out to protect my legs from the cactus. I had scissors in each of my drop bags so that I could cut them off when my legs got too hot.

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Calico 50km — Calico, CA — January 14, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50km
Goal: 6 1/2 hours
Results: 6:35:39
Website: http://www.calicotrailrun.org

General Summary:
This race is turning out to be one of my favorites. Very well organized, and great aid stations. The volunteers were very helpful, despite freezing their butts off in the cold, windy desert.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy, and went to bed early. I’d just run a 50 miler the day before. But the long, relentless uphills were too tempting, so I “ran” them as much as possible. Made new friends too. Set a PR, despite not going under 6 1/2 hours like I wanted to.

Things Done Wrong:
Struggled with the downhills, my quads were pretty sore from yesterdays run, as the last four miles of Avalon are pavement and steeply downhill.

Any Other Stuff:
If you like climbing, it’s a great race. Even the finish is uphill.

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P.F. Chang’s Rock’n’Roll Arizona Marathon — Phoenix, AZ — January 14, 2007

Trish McCormick reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 5 hours
Results: 5.22
Website: http://www.azcentral.com/sports/azetc/07rnraz/07rnraz_index.html

General Summary:
It was a bit colder than I wanted for my first marathon. Course was flat and elevation there is about 1100 feet, these two items ensured that breathing would not be the problem.

Things Done Right:
Tried FIRST’s 16 week training plan. For long runs (20-23 miles) ran 2 loops at Greenland and IC’s Sunday runs.

Things Done Wrong:
Although, I ran all the long runs suggested by the training plan, I should have done more long runs.

Any Other Stuff:
Learned that arnica really works for pain and swelling.

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Carlsbad 1/2 Marathon — Carlsbad, Ca — January 21, 2007

Angela Cassidy reports:
Distance: 13.1 mi
Goal: 2:15
Results: 2:13:10

General Summary:
Well organized event. Pacers carrying signs along the way, so you had an idea of how you were doing as you passed them along the way (or as they passed you!). Nice ocean views. Sometimes the only sound you hear are the other runners and the surf crashing.

Things Done Right:
Good night’s sleep. Gu. Love the Gu. Started on those at mile 6. Made a point to be conscious about my stride and to take bigger steps. It was cold at first (in a California way, yes we are wimps), but I ‘suffered’ it pre-race so that I could stay light and cool during the race. Somehow, after my first 5 mile snags (see things done wrong), I pulled out a near pr.

Things Done Wrong:
Am not sure if this did me in on the first 5 miles, but I downed a Crank e-Gel just before the race (I’ve been testing it as a replacement for Gu) and those e-Gel packs are just massive. Wasn’t sure if I was going to barf those first 5 miles. Got another event next week and will give the e-Gels another shot. If same problems, my bro, John will inherit the remainder of the box.

Any Other Stuff:
Aid stations were great. I think the had one about every 2 km. No need whatsoever to carry water. Will definitely do this one again.

Lines for bathrooms consistently 2-5 deep for middle of the packers, like me. Enough bushes along the way to scrap convention.

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1st Annual City of Angels Half Marathon — Los Angeles, CA — Dec. 3, 2006

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: Less than 9 min/mile
Results: 1:55:00 or 8:47 / mile
Website: http://cityofangelshalf.com/

General Summary:
Inaugural race through the neighborhoods of Griffith Park, Silver Lake, Echo Park and downtown Los Angeles. A big surprise was that more than a couple miles of the route were on dirt trails.

Things Done Right:
Stuck to my plan and kept on pace. Enjoyed the sights and made the most of a working weekend away from home.

Things Done Wrong:
NA

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Holualoa Tucson Marathon — Tucson, AZ — December 10, 2006

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Sub 4:00
Results: 4:09:18
Website: http://www.tucsonmarathon.com/

General Summary:
The course winds along the desert on paved roads, downhill on a point-to-point course along the beautiful Santa Catalina mountain range.

Things Done Right:
Exercised mental discipline maintaining a decent pace after realizing early that it wasn’t going to be my day. Didn’t fight (at least not too much) the headwind that can be frustrating in a point-to-point course.

Things Done Wrong:
Ill prepared; no speed work or strength training leading up to race.

Any Other Stuff:
2,500 foot net elevation drop.

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Christianson Trail Race — Phoenix, AZ — January 7, 2007

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 14 Miles
Goal: Well run race
Results: 1:38:11
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com

General Summary:
From an Arizona standard it was cold the morning of January 7, 2007. I had arrived at Mountain View Park, the staging area of the Christianson Trail Race, and stood shivering while waiting in the race day registration line. Christianson TR is run on the N Mountain Preserve in North Phoenix. Over the past two years I had been suffering from a chronic plantar fasciitis injury and arthritis like symptoms. Finally rehabilitated I had been training consistently since Thanksgiving week. Today marked the day that I would finally be able to begin local racing.

The next 14 miles would be a fast and furious, rolling course that would test my ability to sustain and mitigate the rough downhills and while continuing to run the uphills hard. Looking over the field I knew that usually (with the exception of the previous year) Christianson TR brought out the fast cross country runners, home for the holidays and in the best shape of the year. I identified four young runners (Zach, Logan, Tanner and Benjamin) that looked like they fit the bill and knew my work was cut out for me.

At the beginning of the race I strategically positioned myself behind these runners so as not to be forced to lead the race. However, due to a poorly marked turn in the course at the beginning of the race I ended up taking the lead with these runners directly behind me. I concentrated on running efficiently and somewhat slowly during the first mile of the course. During a long section of slightly downhill running I felt that I was gaining ground on the rest of the leaders, so I picked up the pace slightly to see if they would try to follow. The answer came quickly as the runners caught up to me going thru the first aid station.

The next section of the course is marked by rough, hilly terrain with one, somewhat significant climb. During the climb I continued to lead and we lost all runners except for four of us, me and three of the young cross country guys. I had hoped that I would sense some weakness with these guys during the extended uphill section. However, during the climb the realization was that they were not fazed by the fast uphill pace that I was setting. This concerned me as I knew the next section of the course would be even steeper. Typically this race is won by those that could maintain an aggressive uphill pace, while not allowing them to get beat up on the downhill. The downhill section of this part of the course is somewhat technical and I had the advantage of practicing on this course for most of the past weekends since I had returned to training. I gained ground, but had a feeling that I would lose this ground on the next, very steep part of the course.

The toughest section of the course began after the next aid station with a slightly uphill section that turned into a grueling 20% grade towards the top of the hill. Two of the runners caught me during the slightly uphill portion and subsequently passed me on the extreme grade towards the top. At the top of the hill two runners were slightly ahead of me with another runner a slightly behind me. Throughout the next section of the course till the turnaround we would run in this fashion. The course is somewhat flat for a couple miles and then it climbs and descends a few hills before the turnaround at Dreamy Draw Park.

After the turnaround the fourth place runner made his move, passing me. He would eventually pass the runner directly ahead of me and finish second. I definitely felt the lack of a strong base. Although, during the last half I felt like I was running strong, but not quite as strong as the first half. The truth is that I lost 4 minutes to the winner Tanner who ended up finishing in 1:34:49. His time is very respectable for the long course. Second and third place went to Zach and Logan at 1:36:01 and 1:37:45. My time was 1:38:11 followed by Brian Hall at 1:38:51 and Benjamin at 1:44:02 . The result, I believe, showed that with a little more restraint on the first half I probably could have made up time on the second. But, hey! It’s just my first race back, so I’m just jazzed to be running again.

On a side note I am very impressed with Tanner, Zach, Logan and Benjamin. These guys ended up being in the High School Cross Country team. I hope this is a visible trend of a greater popularity of running in our high schools. Also, Tanner improved his time by over 9 minutes from last year’s race!!! Way to go!

Things Done Right:
Started slowly and efficiently

Things Done Wrong:
Could of shown more restraint on the first half of the race.

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P.F. Chang’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Arizona Marathon — Phoenix — January 14, 2007

Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:15
Results: 3:12
Website: http://www.rnraz.com/home.html

General Summary:
It was a cold 29°F dark start at 7:40am. With no wind, dawn peaking over the horizon through the downtown buildings, and a flat low altitude course, it turned into perfect running conditions. It also became my best race.

Things Done Right:
I was able to recover from the NC Outer Banks marathon 9 weeks earlier and get back into shape for this marathon. I stayed warm before the race started and dressed properly for the temperature — long sleeve cold weather Under Armour shirt/pants and a hat for the first few miles. I ran in new lighter weight shoes. I held back the first 10 or 11 miles then picked up the pace for a 6 minute negative split.

Things Done Wrong:
The only distraction I had in the second half of the race were four blisters forming around my big toe on my right foot. The new shoes sure felt good for the 11 mile break-in run two weeks earlier.

Any Other Stuff:
The Rock ‘n’ Roll bands were spaced about every mile and helped energize me at times. The aid stations were well stocked with a long line of volunteers at each one. Parking at the finish area was surprisingly easy with such a large crowd. The bus transportation from the parting area to the start line was prompt.

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35th Annual Houston-Chevron Marathon — Houston, Texas — January 14, 2007

Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub-4:10
Results: 4:29:44
Website: http://www.chevronhoustonmarathon.com/site3.aspx

General Summary:
Flat, single-loop course through the streets (mostly concrete) of the 4th largest city in US.

Things Done Right:
Visited with friends before, during, and after race. Escaped 4 plus hours of pounding the concrete without any residual damage. Notched 19th finish and 8th straight Houston Marathon.

Things Done Wrong:
Over-dressed, no excuse, native Texan, should have known better! Under-hydrated, cramped up the last 7 plus miles.

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Tonto Fun Run — Cave Creek, AZ — January 28, 2007

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 25 Miles
Goal: Consistant non-race effort
Results: 4:10
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com

General Summary:
Tonto Fun Run

The Tonto Fun Run is held North of Cave Creek, Arizona in the beautiful, but extremely rugged Tonto National Forrest. It is an unofficial, 25 mile event that claims 6500 ft of elevation gain/loss. I would estimate it is more like 4000 ft. I ran this event in preparation for the 50K Pemberton race February 12. The goal was to run a consistent non-race effort for the duration. The first half of the race, although somewhat technical was amazing with incredible views. Most of the second part of this year’s course was completely washed out due to fires from a year ago. So, “adventure running” is a key word to describe this section. My time from 3 years ago was significantly faster because of this section. 4:10 was my time at the end. Although this was over 50 minutes faster than the second place person.

Things Done Right:
Good pre-event preparation. Felt good afterwards with limited soreness.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t eat right afterwards

Any Other Stuff:
Great adventure running

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Rocky Raccoon 100 — Huntsville State Park TX — Feb 3 & 4

Anton Krupicka reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: Win, Break the course record (13:16)
Results: 1st, 13:32:20
Website: http://www.tejastrails.com/rocky.html

General Summary:
The idea of doing the Rocky Raccoon 100 didn’t occur to me until barely two weeks before the race. However, after a weekend that consisted of a 7:46 run on Saturday followed by a 5:02 run on Sunday, I decided I was in shape to finish a 100 miler two weeks later. However, my late-breaking decision to enter meant that I’d done no training specific to the flat and fast nature of the Huntsville State Park trails (i.e., no speedwork). My interest in Rocky was piqued by the ranking of Jorge Pacheco’s 13:16:56 there last year as being the year’s number three ultrarunning performance, so I went into the race with the clear goal of bettering Eric Clifton’s ten years old 13:16:02 course record. Finally, when a friend offered to share a free hotel room and rental car, I figured I had no real reason to not run the race. Besides, I was sick and tired of all the snow and cold here on the Front Range.

After my now customary four bagels with peanut butter and honey the night before and a Powerbar about an hour before the start, I was ready to get going. Rocky Raccoon is five laps of a 20 mile loop that contains two out and backs as it roughly circumnavigates Raven Lake. The course is primarily on soft, snaking, single-track trails through thick forest. There are also extensive sections of double-track jeep road and some boardwalk that crosses a swampy section. The climbing is minimal---this course is probably the best example of “gently rolling” that I’ve come across. The roots were talked about a lot, but I didn’t think they were nearly as bad as everyone made them out to be; maybe I’m just used to rougher trails. The very thick forest shut out almost all direct sunshine (a plus), and there were supposed to be alligators in the park-unfortunately, I didn’t see any. Altogether, it was a very enjoyable running environment. The weather would be basically perfect for running all day long (just below freezing on the first loop, in the 40s and 50s for the rest).

The race started at 6:00am at Raven Lodge on Raven Lake. Going into the race I knew that Jorge Pacheco (had won it the past two years) and Akos Konya (almost beat Scott Jurek at Badwater this year) were both very legit competitors, so they were my main concern.

I spent the night before the race at the Super 8 in Huntsville with two Virginia Beachians, John Price (Pizzy) and Jenn Shelton, so I slept quite well and we made it to the start with plenty of time for milling around, worrying about drop bags, and making several trips to the Port-a-potties.

At the start, some guy took off right away and Jorge, Akos, and I tucked in behind him for the first mile or so. It was dark despite the full moon because the forest was so thick, and Jenn had convinced me that we didn’t need to carry any lights, but she was wrong. Even in the first mile or so I felt like I was pushing way faster than I would have if Jorge weren’t right in front of me, and then when we ducked into the woods onto the first section of rooty, muddy singletrack trail Jorge quickly gapped me and I stuck back with Akos so that I could glom off his light. I was definitely still quite uncomfortable with how fast we were moving, but I didn’t want to let Jorge get too far ahead and I didn’t want to let Akos drop me because I needed his light.

At about the 2.5 mile mark of the loop we popped out onto the jeep road for the first out and back section. When we got there I was relieved to find that we could still see Jorge’s light bobbing away in the distance, but just barely. However, he was far enough away that I stopped caring about keeping him in sight and concentrated on just running with Akos. The jeep double-track road was slightly rolling and very un-technical, so we were flying on this section and I was getting more and more despondent because it felt to me like I was racing a marathon, not a 100 miler-I can almost guarantee that we broke 7 minutes for a couple of the miles in there.

We hit the first aid station (I had four gels with me and a bottle in my hand, so I didn’t stop at any of the stations the first loop) and then turned around and started running back, now into all the lights of the oncoming runners. Jenn whooped at me on the way back-she was in the top 10 overall running with a pack of dudes looking like she was having the time of her life-but I just sort of growled at her; I’m not joking at all when I say that the thought of dropping had already crossed my mind more than once, which is totally stupid, but it was just the way I was feeling. The thing I like about 100 milers is being able to have a lot of fun and be totally relaxed for a solid 6-7 hours before I start racing and here I was racing away right from the start. It really pissed me off.

Anyways, Akos and I really started pushing it on the way back up the road until we finally hopped onto some more singletrack where he let me take the lead and I continued to use his light, but the sun was starting to come up and things were getting brighter. Akos fell two or three times in this short section of trail which I thought was funny-he was clearly a terrible technical runner. Incidentally, I never even stubbed my toe-let alone fell-the entire 100 miles. For all its reputation of being full of roots, I thought that the trail was great.

Pretty soon we came to the second aid station at about the 7 mile mark where you make a hard right turn (we were on a somewhat sandy, jeep-type road again) and begin the second out-and-back section of the loop. After a little bit we crossed a wooden bridge (with a steep ramp up to it that would kind of suck later in the race) that dumps you out onto another nice section of rolling trail. This was probably the “hilliest” part of the whole loop. I’d been needing to pee for a long time, so I stopped and ended up losing 45 seconds to Akos-I REALLY need to train myself to pee on the fly! So, from there I was running with some pretty irrational desperation to catch back up. I could see he wasn’t that far ahead, but I really wanted to get up there again.

Before long, though, Jorge was coming back at me followed by Akos, and moments later I’d hit the turnaround Farside aid station (10 miles) and was in hot pursuit. I saw that I was only about 40 seconds behind Jorge and Akos was right behind him and before I knew it I’d caught up to both of them and the three of us ran as a pack back into the Dam Road aid station (13 miles-I distinctly remember seeing 1:31 on my watch here, so, a raging 7 minute pace for that first 13 miles) at the end of the out and back. Once we’d all caught up to each other the pace slowed considerably, and when we dropped down into the short dam loop Jorge let me take the lead and I ran as easily and slowly as possible because I wanted to do as much as I could to recover from our stupidly fast first 12 miles or so.

The rest of the first loop was quite pleasant. The bridges through the swamp were frosty so I was careful not to slip, and the lakeside trail leading up to the site174 aid station were pretty sloppy and boggy, but it was all at a much more relaxed and comfortable pace. Both Akos and Jorge stopped briefly at the 174 station (17 miles) so I just ran easily on the trail leading up the hill out of it and then pulled over to pee again and lost another 30 seconds or so. It was much easier to catch back up this time, though, and the three of us ran back into the start all together in about 2:27 for the first 20 mile loop. Coming into the Lodge, Jorge said, “Wow, under 2:30, not bad for the first loop, hunh?” and I was thinking, “Yeah, no crap, thanks to your antics.” But, I’m just as much at fault for going out way too fast-nobody was making me stick with Jorge and Akos. Either way, I was not happy with how fast we’d been going.

My first transition at the Lodge was a bit awkward. Jenn had hooked up a crew member for us on-line (Meredith) but we’d never met so I didn’t know what she looked like. But, she ended up doing great after the first loop-I was still frustrated, though, as I just stood there stuffing gels in my pockets while Jorge’s impeccable crew already had him running back up the trail. Between peeing and lack of crew I lost at least 4-5 minutes in the race, but what can you do? Akos spent a long time in the station because he was shedding all his clothes (it was below freezing the first loop-I had a thick patch of ice in my beard), but I took off and caught back up to Jorge within a half-mile or so.

We ran much easier on this loop. Jorge seemed to have a tendency to really want to pick it up on the road out and back to the first aid station, but other than that I was much much much more relaxed and confident. Akos eventually caught up to us, but we all just ran very nice and easy together and I was finally really enjoying the race. Then, on the second out and back, after the Dam Road station, Jorge let me into the lead on the trail and without picking up the pace or trying at all I slowly pulled away from him and Akos. I was astonished this was happening because I felt like I was running as easily as possible, but I decided to just go with it and fully expected them to catch back up whenever they wanted. At the Farside turnaround (30 miles) I saw, much to my surprise, that I had about a 40 second lead on Jorge and a 1:30 or so on Akos. I continued to run as relaxed as I could, but knew that on the upcoming trail sections I would probably put even more time on them because they both seemed a lot more unco mfortable on the trails than me.

The rest of the second loop I just concentrated on running as relaxed as possible, but it was undeniable that I was already feeling the fast start. Somewhere around 35 miles or so, the 50 mile leader (Patrick Russell) passed me on his second loop and he said that I was putting some good distance on them, but I remember thinking that it would have been tough for me to pick it up and run his pace. Not a particularly comforting thought when you’re only about 1/3 of the way done with the race.

Anyways, I ran into the end of the loop in 4:57ish for 40 miles (still a very quick 2:30 lap) and felt a lot better when I was around the energy of the start/finish area. Meredith and I were much smoother this time-she had a new bottle already filled with Gatorade for me and the whole thing went a lot quicker. I dropped my gloves and long-sleeve and was in and out in definitely less than a minute. On my way back out I was much heartened to see that I had a 6 minute lead on Jorge and about 8 minutes on Akos. Even so, all three of us were well under the course record split of 5:08.

Starting the third loop, I was definitely tired, and for some reason I let myself think of the fact that I still had 60 miles to go (which is a terrible thing to do during a 100), but I tried to push that out of my mind and just run as smoothly as possible on the out and back to the first aid station. I saw here again that my lead was continuing to grow, but I really didn’t feel that good. It helped a lot to see Jenn out there whooping and smiling away, and she was still only about 25-30 minutes behind me (she told me later that she hit 40 miles in 5:22, actually picking it up to a 2:40 after her 2:42 first lap) and running very strongly in the top five overall.

I was still taking gels every 30 minutes, but on this loop I started drinking a lot more. Then, I began to feel WAY better when I hopped on the trail over to the Dam Road station-for whatever reason (I think it has to do with varying the muscles that are being used) I always feel a lot better on trails; this was the case at Leadville, too. I stopped to refill my nearly empty bottle at the Dam Road station (very short stop, less than 10 seconds) and then took off on the out and back. The trail over to the Farside aid station was getting pretty crowded with all sorts of runners but I enjoyed it because there was a lot of positive energy and encouragement and I made it to the turnaround (approximately 50 miles) in 6:14-15ish, which would’ve placed me second overall in the 50 mile race. I was pretty mentally relieved to get to the half-way point, but just continued to focus my energies on doing what I could to get to the end of the 3rd loop as efficiently as possible.

My meeting with Meredith back at the lodge was very smooth and I chomped on a Powerbar as I started the 4th loop because I was getting really hungry. I was again surprised to see that I had split about a 2:38 for that loop, giving me a 60 mile time of 7:36 or so. This meant I was still running sub-8 pace and that my cumulative min/mile average was actually a lot closer to 7:30s.about 7:36/mile. None of that was very comforting, though, because I didn’t care at all about trying to maintain it. After only 60 miles I was merely interested in finishing; I thought way more than I should have about what kind of time I could finish with if I walked the last 30-40 miles. Seriously, the main thing that kept me running was the simple fact that I would be finished A LOT sooner than if I walked the whole way. Plus, it would just be plain embarrassing to have started that fast and not finish-especially with Jenn having such a good race behind me. On the run back out to the interpretive center turn-off I saw that my l ead over Jorge had continued to grow and was now 14 minutes.

I took it very easy on the run out to the first aid station. I actually stopped and walked while I peed before I started the first out and back. Things didn’t seem to be looking up. I hated the evenness of that jeep road and stopped caring at all about pushing the pace. Right before the Highway turnaround I lapped Pizzy, and it seemed like I was barely running any quicker than he was (granted, I was 20 miles ahead of him, but still). I stopped very quickly to refill my bottle at this station (only 4 miles or so into the loop.I’d drained my bottle before the end of the 3rd loop, so I was thirsty). Worse yet, it seemed that my lead over Jorge had actually shrunk to 12 minutes! He had picked up a pacer at the beginning of the lap and I was bitter that I didn’t have anyone to pace me. I was confident he wouldn’t be able to catch me once we got back on the trails, though.

The rest of the run over to Farside was pretty uneventful. I saw that my pace had slipped to the 8:45-50 range, but I didn’t care at all. Also, Jorge hadn’t gained anymore time on me, and he was starting to look pretty rough himself. Despite all this, people were still telling me that I was looking great, which was comforting but I just assumed they were blatantly lying. The rest of the loop was pretty uneventful as I continued to chug along at what felt like a crawling pace. I just hoped that some sort of adrenaline connected with finishing would get me through the last loop.

I came into the lodge at 80 miles in 10:32 or so, for a laggardly 2:56 lap. However, I picked up a pacer-Pete from Austin, TX-and we got right back out there with a longsleeve, a Powerbar, and a flashlight. Pete helped me a lot to stay positive, as did the fact that I made the turn-off at the interpretive center without even seeing Jorge! This meant that I had over a 2 mile lead and was a huge mental boost. We kept the pace fairly steady and now that the sun was going down and I was getting into “focus on the finish” mode I didn’t feel the need to drink or eat nearly as much. Pete’s company made the first out and back go by quickly and I was again very heartened to not see Jorge at all-I had at a least a 3 mile lead! I would find out later that he dropped at the first aid station on his 5th loop-only about 16 miles left in the race.
The last lap was very uneventful. Pete and I did a fair amount of joking and I just focused on keeping running. At the Farside aid station with 10 miles to go I had a 42 minute lead over Akos, so I no longer worried about getting caught. However, it was getting dark and we had to turn on our light as we entered the deep woods of the little Dam loop. The dark proved to be a lot more of a hindrance than I’d anticipated. The flashlight was plenty bright it seemed, but a lot of my trail running ability comes from anticipating what’s next in the trail and managing my literal momentum that way (knowing when to push, when to slack off, etc.) but these trails were so windy and it was so dark that this lack of this sort of anticipation killed my momentum. I was pretty much stuck at 9 minute pace until we made the turn onto the last mile and the trail widened up and smoothed out and I was able to pick it up pretty considerably for the final mile to the finish to cross the line at 13:32:20 for a 3:00 last lap (my watch actually split a 2:59:50 hahaha).

Immediately after the race my quads were completely shot (I’d felt great at the finish in Leadville), but I attribute that to the fact that there was no walking in this race. Jenn ended up losing a lot of time on her last loop, too, but she hung on to finish strong in 14:57:18. She’d run her third loop in 2:53 to bring her to 8:15 for 60 miles, which means she went through the 100k in less than the USATF Selection standard of 8:40 for a road 100k...and then ran another 40 miles in 6:42 to finish only a little over 5 minutes behind Akos’ second place time of 14:51:54. Pretty impressive. On Sunday, Jenn and I went for a 30 minute “run” where we covered probably a max of 2 miles in mincing little steps, but I was definitely in a lot better condition than the day after Leadville when I could barely walk. Overall, it was a very well-organized and operated event.

Things Done Right:
Hmmmm. Well, I ran it. Stayed on top of fueling and hydration. Didn’t fall. Tapered A LOT the last 5 days before the race because my ankle was sore from all the ice and snow so that the ankle wasn’t an issue at all during the race. Didn’t wear socks--there was a lot of mud and water on the course.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t plan on doing the race until two weeks beforehand. So, didn’t do any speedwork, didn’t allow for enough of a build-up to be in good enough shape to give a top-notch effort (I only had about 5-6 weeks of good training in a row under my belt). Didn’t carry a flashlight on the first loop. Didn’t have a crew or pacers that I knew beforehand. Didn’t have the confidence or self-assurance to go out at a more reasonable pace that would’ve given me a legitimate shot at the course record. Didn’t clip my toenails the night before---as a result I got three black toenails despite the roomy La Sportiva Slingshot toe boxes.

Any Other Stuff:
Really, this is a great event. I will go back and take a more deliberate shot at the course record. I can run this race a lot faster (not willing to say just how much), I felt like I was just surviving the last 60-70 miles when that’s when you’re supposed to be feeling great and pushing the pace! The lesson to learn of the future is to have more confidence in myself and to know that if someone starts out way too fast---well, it’s 100 miles! I will catch him!

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: under 24 hours
Results: 23:30:39
Website: http://www.tejastrails.com

General Summary:
The Rocky Raccoon 100 is 5 loops of 20 miles. I went in hoping to break 24 hours, after getting lost last year for several miles.

Things Done Right:
Pushed fairly hard the first 60 miles. Did practically even splits the first two loops, with the third being the fastest. The goal was to have as much done in the daylight as possible, since there are literally thousands of roots along this course, making footing difficult if you are a mere mortal like myself. Wore a hot wrap around my back at night, since I don’t manage cold well, and it got very cold! The cold got a lot of runners! It was hard to see at night because my breath kept freezing in front of me. I also wore a thermal face mask, which helped to eliminate that, but sometimes that made breathing difficult. Didn’t do the drop bag thing out on the race, which kept me from stopping at the aid stations looking for them, wasting valuable time. The Little Debbies I had in my pocket were enough, along with my “ultra-crack” and other assorted, mostly legal drug assortment.

Things Done Wrong:
Couldn’t see well at night. Despite feeling strong throughout the race, poor eyesight at night made the last two loops almost the same amount of time as the first three. There were a lot of roots to trip on, and I didn’t want to risk falling and breaking something. Accidentally put Gatorade in the chicken noodle soup the volunteers gave me, to cool it down. Sweet and salty is great if it’s trail mix or Chinese food, but not chicken noodle soup at 1 in the morning.

Any Other Stuff:
Well organized race, but with nearly 300 runners at the start, which was slippery, muddy single track, the start was difficult. Got pushed by some guy trying to rush ahead. He got pushed right back. It was also a nice surprise to see fellow ICers Anthony Krupicka running. Although as I write this the race results aren’t posted, I am sure he went on to win, and maybe set a new course record. There were no armadillos this year, which was a huge disappointment. Last year the course was crawling with them at night. Lots of coyotes and strange owls to listen to at night too.

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New World Snowshoe Championship — Oak Forest Center, (between Luck and Frederic, Wisconsin). — February 10, 2007

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K is the national qualifier (5K and 20K distances also available)
Goal: Qualify for nationals: shoot for around an hour minutes
Results: 13th overall and 5th in age group
Website: http://www.luckrunningclub.com/

General Summary:
Lots of snow and very cold temperatures. A very challenging course due to “sugar” snow and lots of twists and turns. Some short hills. There was a good number of participants this year because Nationals are to be in Minnesota.
http://www.snowshoemagazine.com/view_content.cfm?content_id=316

Things Done Right:
Stayed within my current abilities rather than try to run where I have in the past. Used the race to help become qualified for Nationals but still approached as a training opportunity.

Things Done Wrong:
Raced after less than ideal preparation. I had been recovering from knee pain (bilateral patellofemoral misalignment syndrome!) through late fall and until the snow started falling in mid-January.

Any Other Stuff:
Snowshoe races are a BLAST! I really enjoy the competition and effort as well as the camaraderie following the event.

Embroidered sweatshirt.
Chili lunch and snacks (really great chili).
Door prizes.

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Screamin Snowman 10K — Eldora, Co — February 11, 2007

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 10K - snowshoe
Goal: Do a double — have fun
Results: 1:29:41 (Rufus T Firefly in the results)
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/ssresscreamin07.html

General Summary:
Snow shoe races are FUN!! Great way to get good workout at altitude in the winter. Racing Underground does a good job putting on snow shoe races - interesting courses, good swag. For this race goodies included a light weight Cool Max winter running cap - looks cool and very light weight, have found it very useful.

Things Done Right:
I did PPRR winter series race #3 the day before (in the snow, slush and mud) then did the snow shoe race. I ran hard both days so got my double. Also I had LOTS of fun rumblin’ and stumblin’ through the snow.

Things Done Wrong:
Waited too long to file this race report. Did not do another snowshoe race this season.

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Bi-Lo Myrtle Beach Marathon — Myrtle Beach, South Carolina — Feb 17, 2007

Andy Dillon reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4 hours
Results: 4:29:09
Website: http://www.mbmarathon.com

General Summary:
Nice race, flat, sea level, cool temperatures... should have been a PR race I guess! We made a week’s vacation out of it, and had a good time apart from problems with delayed and cancelled flights :-(

Things Done Right:
managed to get some long, steady runs in (a 16, 18, 20 and a 21) but they were slogs through deep snow and VERY slow! I was so under-prepared I tried Jeff Galloway’s wimps training method of running 8 minutes then walking 1 minute. I’m not sure if it helped or not — the race didn’t go very well for me but it may have gone even worse if I hadn’t tried this method! But I figured that if I can run a marathon in February it will set me up for the summer races so it was a success in that regard!

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough training — the usual problem! Dark mornings and nights, too busy, tons of snow ... you know the story! But you’ve got to just do what you can and get on with it!

Comments on Calculator:
I must have looked like I was running the 16 golden stairs during the last mile — I was going that slow! So maybe the calculator would have worked :-)

Any Other Stuff:
You forget how tough it is running on roads when you have nice (snow covered) trails to train on. Legs felt like lead towards the end! Some poor folks have to train on roads all the time so it reminded me how lucky we Coloradoans are ...

Free beer at the end — instant recovery and HIGHLY recommended! I’m not sure it would be a good idea after Pikes Peak, but at sea level on a cool day it worked wonders!

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Mardi Gras 1/2 Marathon — New Orleans, LA — February 25, 2007

Mireille Cameron reports:
Distance: 13.2 miles
Goal: Under 2:30
Results: 2:26:26
Website: http://www.mardigrasmarathon.com

General Summary:
Enthusiastic crowd; beer at one of the aid stations; the city is still far from recovered.

Things Done Right:
ducking into that little coffee shop early in the race before the rest room opportunities were gone.

Things Done Wrong:
Not pinning my race number to my shirt. It slipped out of my hands and I had to backtrack and wake-up my friends to let me back into the house.

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Old Pueblo 50 mile Endurance run — Soniota, AZ — 03/03/2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 51 miles
Goal: PR
Results: PR by nearly 2 hours 10:48:29
Website: http://www.oldpueblo50.com

General Summary:
The average grade of this course held in the Santa Rita Mountains is 6%, with the last half being harder. There is 7000 ft. of climbing, and 7000 feet of descending. A very good early season training run for those wishing to complete other insane goals, such as Leadville, Western States, or Badwater. Watching the full moon rise on the way home over the desert landscape was spectacular!

Things Done Right:
Lots of Little Debbies, coconut bars, caffeine pills, and cookies helped me take off nearly two hours from last years race without any tapering. Made new friends.

Things Done Wrong:
There are always things to reflect back on and see that you could have done better. I bonked pretty bad between miles 40-46.

Any Other Stuff:
Very well marked course, very well stocked aid stations throughout this moderately tough race. Both RD’s are ultrarunners, and it shows in how well supported this race is. The finisher’s buckle is very nice as well.

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Barcelona Marathon — Barcelona, Spain — March 4th, 2007

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 3
Results: 3:01
Website: http://www.barcelonamarato.es/eng/index.html

General Summary:
Marathon number 82, ninth country.

Things Done Right:
Ran well within myself early on and throughout the race. Never pushed.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t run fast enough.

Any Other Stuff:
The course goes through the fabulous city of Barcelona, past sights such as Gaudi’s famous “La Perdrera,” Casa Batllo, and the cathedral Sangrada Familia.

The joy of a wonderful nine days in Barcelona was extinguished on my return when I learned that my companion and best friend, Sam the Wolfdog died while I was gone. Noble friend, he lived a full life. I will take his ashes to the top of the two 14ers he never made it to the top of and scatter them. In that way he will have been to the top of all 54 14ers of this state.

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Carl Touchstone Memorial 50 mile — DeSoto National Forest, Laurel MS — March 10, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: PR
Results: PR’d! 8:33:48 Second place overall woman, 9th overall finisher
Website: http://www.ms50.com

General Summary:
The Carl Touchstone 50 mile endurance run is held in a long-leaf pine forest. I was amazed by the amount of damage that still remained by hurricane Katrina. It was very humid, with fog so thick at the start it dripped from the trees. It made for a beautiful, surreal start when the sun came up and it all seemed to glow. Later in the day it became very hot as well, which slowed down a lot of runners. Good training for Badwater though.

Things Done Right:
I pushed early on, knowing it was going to get hot and humid. Drank lots and took in extra electrolytes, which paid off later in what turned out to be a second place finish in the women's division. I wasn’t sure for a while, as I was trying hard to stay ahead of a really strong woman from MS who had a lot of experience with running in the humidity. Her decision to change her shoes half-way in the race worked in my favor, even though my quads were still sore from trashing them at Old Pueblo 50 mile the weekend before.

Things Done Wrong:
Arrived tired to the start, from getting lost trying to find my motel, the race head quarters, getting a smoking room because my reservation got screwed up, etc.... they’re like, “ we’re right by the Waffle House.” But everything was by the Waffle House! There seemed to be on every corner.

Any Other Stuff:
A loop course, well organized, nice finisher’s wards, and trophies for the top three men and women. Very good pre-race and post race food. I love the way those southern boys talk down there too!

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2007 U.S. National Snowshoe Championships — Maple Grove, MN — March 10, 2007

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: around 50 minutes; high age-group finish; possibly medal
Results: 52:57 5th in age group
Website: http://www.2007snowshoenationals.com

General Summary:
Racing on the groomed ski trails was a guarantee of faster times and perhaps some advantage to the true road racers with quicker leg turnover as opposed to those used to powering up steeper slopes and negotiating more technical terrain. The course was very challenging and interesting, non-the-less, with some short stretches of single-track thrown in for additional variation.

The start saw an extremely fast pace and I immediately found myself struggling with the prospect of going anaerobic too soon! Needless to say the second loop was not much fun for me as I slowly drifted back from my early position and out of contention for the medal I had hoped for.

There were some excellent performances on the day in all three championship races — 5K Junior, 10K senior women, and 10K senior men races were each competed separately. Check out the link to the race web page for a list of all results.

Things Done Right:
Able to train for several weeks on snowshoes after a very late start to winter (mid-January for adequate snow). Had a great time training on snow and enjoyed the weather on race day.

Things Done Wrong:
Perhaps expected too much from myself so soon after struggling with chonromalacia throughout the fall and beginning of winter. I was unable to run during late November and all of December. Running on snow seemed to help me begin to recover and I’m sure I started much too fast for my current fitness level.

Any Other Stuff:
The race course consisted of a series of loops on groomed trails. Spectators at the Visitor Center were able to view the races at the start, finish, and intermediate points. A fully snow-covered course was guaranteed thanks to an extensive system of snow-making equipment. There was sufficient natural snow, due to two blizzards in the two weeks prior to the event, for competitors to run two 5K loops as opposed to four 2.5K loops.

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The Pueblo Chieftain’s 29th Annual 10 mile— Pueblo — March 4, 2007

Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 70 minutes (up to 70:59
Results: 71:00
Website: http://www.chieftain.com/springrunoff/

General Summary:
The weather was beautiful for this race. It was cool, sunny, and no wind. The course is basically flat. However, there is a significant portion of the race on concrete.

Things Done Right:
This was an excellent short, fast training run for my marathon training. I had a close to even split — 35 minutes for the first half and then 36 minutes for the second half.

Things Done Wrong:
I was fooled by one of the mile markers and may have slowed down too much the next mile.

Any Other Stuff:
This course was much faster than the 10m GOG and the third race of the Winter Series (the only other 10m runs I have done).

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Lakewood Mug Run 10K — Lakewood, CA (not CO) — March 10, 2007

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 10K - flat & fast course
Goal: Qualify for a bib that starts with B at Bolder Boulder 10K. Get from downtown LA to Lakewood, CA tim
Results: 45:12
Website: http://www.runnersimage.com/showresults.php?race_id=748

General Summary:
I had to go to LA for a conference - thought it would be a great chance to do a race at sea level on a flat & fast course. It was the week after the LA Marathon so pickings were limited but the Lakewood Sheriff Mug Run 10K fit the bill. Flat as a pancake course. The race started and ended at a shopping mall, most of race was on the roads of Lakewood. Event was well organized. There must have been a screw up on marking miles 3 & 4. After doing miles 1 & 2 at just under 7:20 I was shocked when my split for mile 3 was 6:45. I tried to ask the couple runners by me about the odd split, but they were “tuned out.” Mile 4 was “slow” by an equal amount so someone just screwed up placing the mile 3 marker...meanwhile I started looking around and realize I was the only one running without an iPod. I thought “Oh my god this is an iPod 10K, I am going to be DQ’ed.” Seriously I would guess 70+% of the runners had iPod’s; welcome to the Southland aka SoCal.

Things Done Right:
I left the hotel in downtown LA and headed for the freeway on ramp with the lyrics from Jerry Jeff Walker’s song in my head:

Pack up all your dishes, make note of all good wishes
Say goodbye to the landlord for me, Sons of bitches always bore me
Throw out those L.A. papers, moldy box of vanilla wafers
Adios to all this concrete, gonna get me some dirt road back street...
If I can just get off of that L.A. freeway without getting killed or caught
Down the road in a cloud of smoke for some land that I ain’t bought...

I got to the race with time to spare.

I ran even splits with a time that qualifies for a BA bib for the upcoming Bolder Boulder.

Things Done Wrong:
In my log it says “A+ effort” so I guess I got all I could for where I was at; that said, I could have done more speed work, I could train more consistently, I could be 10 pounds lighter or 20 years younger.

Any Other Stuff:
I wore my Incline shirt for the race (I always wear an incline shirt at out of state races - you never know what interesting discussions it might lead to!!! BTW: sure could use some new cool max Incline shirts (hint hint). Anyway through the Incline shirt met Dan & Vicki Adams who had “successfully” entered the Peak March 1 and were planning their tactics for early the upcoming Tuesday morning when we did it all again - I have not checked to see if they got in. I also met a couple trail runners and a 50 state runner due to Incline shirt - one was a massage therapist - nice bonus!

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Catalina Marathon — Santa Catalina Island. Avalon, CA — March 17, 2007

Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Under four hours
Results: 4:08:12
Website: http://www.pacificsportsllc.com/CatalinaMarathon/athlete.htm

General Summary:
My first marathon!! The day stated by getting up at 3:30 am and catching a boat from Avalon to Two Harbors where is where the race starts. I felt really good in the first nine miles, but by mile nine I began to cramp. I was able to overcome the cramps by mile 13 and I just continued to keep my focus.

We couldn’t have asked for better weather! It was overcast and foggy. The humidity kept it really cool, but from about mile 18 to mile 21 or so we came out of the clouds and the sun and heat were relentless.

What a great place to run my first 26.2! Most of the views were covered by the clouds but there was a couple of ocean views that were just spectacular!

Thanks “coach,” John, Scott, Clark, Tony, Brian and all of the Tuesday and Thursday winter running crew. Without all of you this wouldn’t have been possible! Your companionship on this journey was fantastic!

Things Done Right:
Trained hard, tapered, and stayed healthy!

Things Done Wrong:
I need to figure out my diet and work on taking care of my “business” before the race!!

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Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: P.R. and sub 3:30
Results: P.R., 3:34:21
Website: http://www.pacificsportsllc.com

General Summary:
This was my 7th consecutive Catalina Marathon, and each year I forget how tough the hills really are. Runners World recently dubbed it the best trail marathon in the country, and it’s been hailed as the toughest sea-level marathon. I don’t know if that’s true, but it’s always a humbling experience for me. This year, I had the pleasure of bringing out 3 first-time marathoners (fellow ICers Tim Steffens & Scott Perry, as well as my brother-in-law), along with 2 other experienced runners (fellow ICers John Gardner & Clark Sundahl), and we had an absolute blast. The race also coincided with St. Patrick’s Day, which added to the revelry. We spent about 11 hours “re-hydrating” after the run. :)

Things Done Right:
The weather was perfect for a marathon... overcast and cool until about mile 19. I thought I had hydrated well, although I had some minor leg cramp issues in the final few miles. This caused me to slow down my pace and sacrifice my sub 3:30 goal time, but I was happy with the overall race. I still managed to eke out 3rd place in my age group and Clark took 2nd (with a time of 3:21). I bested my P.R. for this marathon by 10 minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
May have gone out too fast, but I think I would have hurt at mile 23 regardless. So, in essence, I heeded the first part of the Incline Club motto. Go out fast. Problem is, when it hurt, I couldn’t go faster. I also ate a greasy, nastily delicious In&Out Burger (Double Double, animal style) the day after the race. In hindsight, this was a bad idea.

Any Other Stuff:
The bars in the town of Avalon on St. Patrick’s Day are out of control. Since the town is about the size of a college campus, there’s no need to drive, hence people tend to get a little wild. The highlight of the weekend was watching a rather robust, middle-aged white dude at the karaoke bar doing the greatest rendition of “Funky Cold Medina” I’ve ever heard. I’m hoping he’ll be back next year. I know I will.

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Run Through Time (Turret) Marathon — Salida, Colorado — March 17, 2007

Tom Kelecy reports:
Distance: 26.2?
Goal: Finish on 2 legs
Results: Finished on 1.9 legs (4:10:15)
Website: http://www.salidarec.com/ccrc/results/2007-Turret-Marathon-Results.htm

General Summary:
Found out about this race on Wednesday, made the decision to run it on Thursday, tapered on Friday, ran it on Saturday — a training run (for SJ50) I told myself — spent Sunday hobbling up and down the several thousand feet of stairs in our house. A little cool at the start (upper 30’s low 40’s), but warmed up nicely for a beautiful day. The race started and finished in Salida which has an elevation of around 7000’. The net elevation gain was about 2000’, but the cumulative was 3800’+. The outbound leg was to the old mining town of Turret, and after a little climb back out of the valley the town resides in, we branched off for an alternate route back to Salida with around 9 miles to go. This last 9 miles had some pretty good climbs, not much snow but a some judiciously placed mud, and some very steep and rocky downhills over the last 22-24 miles. Tried kicking off the tip-top inch or so of a billion tons of Rocky Mountain on the downhill so I wouldn’t have to lift my leg s so much, but couldn’t get them

to accommodate. Hobbled in the last half mile or so to the finished on the same section we started on. There were 96 starters (I finished 15th overall), with the top male finishing in 3:09:21, and the top female finishing in 3:55:51.

Things Done Right:
Kept a good, reasonable pace for most of the race. Did the Ute-Waldo-LRR double the previous Sunday, rather than the day before the race. Does swimming chest deep in snow count as cross-training? No weeks of pre-race anxiety by deciding to run it 1-2 days before the event.

Things Done Wrong:
Bonked a little at the end, in spite of the whole day of rest I got. The 3 gels I downed were probably not enough, and I should have drunk more fluids along the course.

Any Other Stuff:
A wonderful, small town atmosphere, with lot’s of nice runners and volunteers. Though the age group awards went only to the top person in each category (I finished 3rd in mine), I did win a $15 coupon to a local pizza parlor at the raffle. Lucky wins out over good, yet again!

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Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: Trail Marathon
Goal: Finish before the awards ceremony at 2 p.m.
Results: 4:23:21; 3rd woman

General Summary:
Gorgeous day for a run in the mountains. Nice, low key event, great awards (hand drawn framed art by the race director), friendly runners & volunteers. Very challenging course — lots of climbing and lots of tricky downhill. Nice shirt, good door prizes.

Things Done Right:
Had no real expectations going into this race, except to get in a good training run in preparation for the San Juan 50. Did some long-ish runs on all kinds of terrain, so figured I could finish.

Things Done Wrong:
No taper, can’t run downhill on loose rocks, need 1/2 size bigger shoes & gaiters (my feet got a wonderful exfoliation)!

Any Other Stuff:
We decided to run this race 2 days before; it just sounded like it would be a fun event and a good way to see what kind of shape I’m in. We ran with the half marathoners until their turnaround point, which was mostly uphill. They turned around and we continued on to the ghost town of Turret. There continued to be plenty of climbing and at one point we crested this hill and the most magnificent view of the Collegiate Peaks opened up and I felt like singing (OK everybody: The hills are alive...)! At the 17-ish mile aid station we took a trail that was pretty rolling, with lots more uphill than I expected — it just kept coming! Then the trail started downhill, steeply, on some really loose rocks. I had been 2nd place woman until then, but because I run like a girl on that stuff, I got passed by one woman, and several men. We finished back at the park where we started. I was excited to see the finish line! I was very proud of Tom who ran an excellent race!

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Under 4:00
Results: 3:41:25
Website: http://www.salidarec.com/ccrc/results/2007-Turret-Marathon-Results.htm

General Summary:
A dirt road/trail marathon in the mountains around Salida. The first 17 miles are primarily on dirt road with the first 12 miles leading to the ghost town of Turret. After turning around at Turret the course goes back down the raod 5 miles to a trail. The final 9 miles are unaided on a trail back to the start/finish line.

Things Done Right:
This was to be a long training run, so I did not taper. After the first 6 miles I was feeling strong and pushed the pace up to the high point at mile 8. Overall, I had a strong race.

Things Done Wrong:
I pushed hard on purpose and once I came back down to the trail portion (last 9 miles) I was little tired and slowed a bit. I normally don’t use GU and took some at the turn around I think that led to some stomach irritation.

Any Other Stuff:
After the high point around mile 8 the next 4 miles to Turret are hilly and some parts steep with Turret being at the bottom of a hill. The trail portion is very rocky and steep in some spots with some mud, but no snow. The temperature at the start was 29 degrees, but that was perfect.

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4 hours
Results: 5:33:48 time to taper!

General Summary:
A low-key marathon, the course reminded me a lot of the Collegiate Peaks races in May. No frills, spartan aid stations, well organized, nice volunteers, a good taper run before the Umstead 100 in two weeks.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy, obviously with a time of over 5 1/2 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
Took it too easy. The slow pace I was moving at made me tired. Took too much caffeine before race,( I didn’t think I could do that). I drank a can of Spike, that contained 300mg of caffeine, along with 6 cups of coffee, trying to wake up while driving out the morning of the race.I bonked pretty bad 7 miles into the race. I also forgot my Little Debbies. However, from the looks of things, Dr. Rocket and his partner in crime must have been downing lots of Little Debbies, as they both finished in respectable times.

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Jon Teisher reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish in time to drink some green beer!
Results: 4:28:26
Website: http://www.salidarec.com/ccrc/index.htm

General Summary:
Race is too early in the season for me to ever hope for a good time, but it serves as a really good training run. Very hilly, the course runs from Salida out to the ghost town of Turret, then returns along the same route until 18 miles, where you jump off the dirt road onto some fairly technical singletrack.

Things Done Right:
Conservative start helped evade the inevitable crash I knew I was gonna have. Figured I’d hit the wall at 20 miles, but it wasn’t until around 22 miles that I really fell apart.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough early season long runs!

Any Other Stuff:
The race is now in it’s second year, and is a really fun low key event. They also have a half marathon.

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Bob Mishler reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Finish Comfortably
Results: 5:43

General Summary:
County roads from Salida to Turret, last 9 or ten miles more primitive road. Low key run in a great place.

Things Done Right:
Went out at a reasonable pace that I could sustain

Things Done Wrong:
Could have gone out a little faster

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Roma Marathon — Rome Italy — March 18, 2007

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: Marathon: 42.195Km
Goal: Do a 26.2 mile (42.195 km) running tour of Rome. Complete marathon #90; 29th year in a row to do one
Results: 3:53:34
Website: http://www.tds-live.com/wtrpg/race.jsp?id=1254&locale=2057

General Summary:
I was planning to run a March marathon and was already registered for the National Marathon in Washington DC, but my wife wanted to go to Italy for her 60th birthday. Sounded fun to me, so I looked for a different marathon in March, possibly just before we planned to go - imagine my delight when I found that the Rome (Roma) Marathon was scheduled during the time we planned to be in Italy.

So I did a marathon through the streets of Rome: start and finish in front of the Colosseum, ran past all the tourist spots — Circus Maximus, Pantheon, Vatican/St. Peters Basilica, Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps, etc. etc. etc. It was a big city marathon, over 12,000 starters, streets closed - NO traffic issues, very well organized. Runners in Italy approach aid stations like they drive, no queuing, just blast in and blast out - he who hesitates gets bumped in the rear!!

Things Done Right:
I ran a marathon in Rome, Italy, WOW it was awesome!! My first marathon of 2007, my 29th straight year of running one or more marathons and my 90th marathon overall (do not count the Peak - it is a lot of things - a marathon is not one of them).

The marathon went well, settled into pretty even pace once I quit thinking about miles (only Km’s marked on course - 42 of them, plus an extra .195 Km - blame the Queen of England). I had slightly negative splits (1:57:34/1:56:00). I spent the rest of the day after the marathon wandering around the Forum, Colosseum, and Palatine Hill - lots of walking, time on feet. My wife was very impressed - I told her it was much easier than a doubling :-). I think all that walking actually cut muscle soreness from race in the days that followed

Things Done Wrong:
I did not learn my Km pace chart. I was not focused on a specific time, but I did not want to go too fast or too slow. Early in the race I was trying to figure out what my km splits worked out to in miles - I was confused!!!

I probably did not prep for race properly: the days before the marathon I was in tourist mode, lots of time walking and standing (my legs ached), I probably did not get enough sleep, I included Italian wine in my hydration routine, sometimes I had no idea what I was eating, but hey how often do you get to Rome!!

Any Other Stuff:
I wore my Incline shirt for the race (I always wear an incline shirt at out of state races - you never know what interesting discussions it might lead to!!!). Only one person commented on the shirt/Peak - a Yank with ties to Colorado. That is by far the fewest comments - well maybe there were other comments but “Non capisco Italiano” (or German, French, etc.)

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Bataan Memorial Death March — White Sands Missile Range, NM — March 25, 2007

Scott Suter reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi.
Goal: 4:30:00
Results: 4:07:19
Website: http://bataanmarch.com

General Summary:
The race was made up of roughly 25% civilians and the remainder were all military personnel. The Death March is to honor all those who served, died, were tortured, and were taken captive during the defense of the Bataan peninsula in the Philippines during WWII.

The course was made up of roughly 8 miles of pavement and the rest was on desert jeep roads and trails. Between miles five and twelve was a steady uphill grind and the IC training on Rampart really paid off for me. There was roughly 1,810 total vertical feet of climbing with stretches of sandy washes and arroyos to negotiate along the way.

Things Done Right:
I had a great time talking with others during the march. I stopped and took pictures along the way and enjoyed the beautiful desert scenery which backed up to the San Andres Mountains. At the aid stations I took time to stop and thank the POWs that survived the real Death March and Japanese prison camps of which many were starved, dehydrated, tortured, and decapitated along their 65-100 mile march before reaching the prison camps.

Things Done Wrong:
I stayed well hydrated...so I thought, and I got some serious muscle cramps around mile 20 and had to stop and stretch a couple of times. There were plenty of aid stations along the way, so I hammered down some much needed fluids to get me home.

Any Other Stuff:
I slept in the back of my truck with other campers at a park that was adjacent to the staging area. The comradeship was awesome! At 4:30 I woke up to bagpipes playing at the staging area signifying that the continental breakfast was open and things were underway. At 6:00 a prayer was said and a ceremony was held with a roll call of the few remaining Bataan soldiers and of those that were no longer with us. I along with many others started the race with a big lump in my throat and tears in my eyes. At 6:00 the cannon went off and the march started. Several POWs sat along the starting area and it was moving to see them as I shook their hands before crossing the timing mat. It was still dark as I ran the first few miles and it was a great to time reflect and give thanks to all the men and women who have bravely and honorably served this wonderful country we live in. Soon the sun started to come up and the morning sunrise across the desert and adjacent mountains was just breathtaking! Marching with our men and wo men in uniform was quite a moving experience that I’ll never forget.

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Platte River Half Marathon — Littleton, Colorado — April 1, 2007

Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 13.11
Goal: sub- 1:24:00
Results: 1:21:41
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com/

General Summary:
I decided to do this race at the last minute. I figured I’d be doing my usual Trophy Series race with the Rocky Mountain Road Runners but I also knew I really needed to get some distance in one way or another and since I couldn’t travel down to Manitou this weekend this would have to suffice.

Not a bad showing. I set a new CPR (Comeback PR- after a 12 year layoff) for this distance. The results of this race was even faster than my time last year at the Rock N Roll Half Marathon in Phoenix at only 1000 feet in altitude. First mile however was wayyyy too fast (5:45). I settled in behind Jay Survil for about 5 minutes and since we run about the same time during first miles I thought I was being conservative. NOT.

Second mile was at 11:51, third at 17:57, 5K around 18:30(which I have only run 18:49 up here at altitude so far. Four came at 24:00 and then because of the hills going up and down from then on my splits started slowing a little. I missed 5 but was still around 30:15-30:30. From miles 6-9 I was much slower and started wondering when my friend would be passing me. We came up and over a bridge between 9 and 10 that allowed me to look back but I couldn’t see anyone. I had started feeling my legs getting heavier and heavier between 6-9 but tried to hold it as much as possible.

Hit 10 at 1:01:50 and knew if I could hold this I would easily run much faster than my planned 1:24 and maybe even below 1:22 but it would be close. Hit miles 11 and 12 with fairly consistent splits but then I saw the climb over the aqueduct. I knew they said there would be a good climb from miles 12 and 12.5 and they weren’t kidding! At about 12.25 there was a nice and continuous climb up and over the aqueduct. I pushed it up and over, then flew down and made the left and up toward mile 13. I kept looking at my watch to see when 1:21 would pass. I wanted to be at 13 no later than 1:21:15 so that I had a chance of breaking 1:22. Just before I made the final turn at 13 I saw 1:21 and passed 13 around 1:21:08. It was just a matter of hauling it down to the finish. I heard the announcer call out 1:21:15 for the runner just ahead so I tried to hold it until the finish. Then I saw that I could easily break 1:22 by a comfortable margin but this time I wanted to break my CPR of 1:21:52 that I ran down in Phoeni x. Hit the tape in 1:21:40 and was very relieved and a little shocked that I did so well.

Therefore I was glad to have been talked into doing the run. What started as a training run where a sub-1:24 would have been more than welcomed; I ended up setting a new personal record for the distance. I’ll take it for sure.

Tough, stacked race for masters. Fortunately for me, they took the first 3 masters out for their own overall placing which left me in third for my age group. $20.00 gift certificate to the Buckhorn Exchange and a visor.

Good start to the season. Hopefully along the way there will be some improvement. This was my first year in this race so I didn’t know what to expect. Pleasantly surprised.

This is getting to be a very competitive race. Based on this year’s time, I would have placed 10th overall but instead placed 26th. I wonder what it will be like next year! I better hope to break 1:20.

Things Done Right:
Had a good amount of fuel in my stomach to sustain me for the length and speed without bonking.

Refusing to give into the heaviness of my legs. I knew that by constantly driving my knees up and extending my legs forward instead of backing off during the last 2 miles would help me finish stronger than I had been running during the middle portion of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Getting caught up in the heat of the first mile. I planned to be at the first mile no faster than 6:00-6:10. I’m sure that my time would have been below 1:21 had I not gone out too quickly. I am fairly good about hitting negative splits during longer races so this was not a good example of how to run a negative-split race. However, if I decide to do this race next year, the experience from this year will help hold me back from going out too hard.

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Pablo Najera reports:
Distance: 13.1 Miles
Goal: 1:40
Results: 1:35:57
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com/

General Summary:
I think I did ok, I was pushing for one hour and half after I was feeling good and I was able to maintain a good pace, but the last mile was hard for me, I guess I have to train harder.

Things Done Right:
I was able to maintain a good pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Star tapering one week late.

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Jon Teisher reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 1:35:00
Results: 1:42:06
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com/

General Summary:
Decided to head up north for my first road race in quite some time. Pretty nice course, paved walkway along the Platte River from Lakewood to downtown Denver. Good support along the course, really nice post-race shindig.

Things Done Right:
First half went very well. Started conservatively and was able to hold sub-seven minute miles until the halfway point.

Things Done Wrong:
As this was just a training run, I didn’t really prepare the way I normally would for a race. Stayed out a bit late the night before, could definitely feel that the second half of the run.

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Rick Isaac reports:
Distance: 1/2 Marathon
Goal: 1:57:45
Results: 1:55:34

General Summary:
First race of this length in 18 years. Really enjoyed the day. Didn’t realize how much I missed it. Good first training race for BTMR and PPA this summer.

Things Done Right:
Entered the race. Started conservatively and reached goal of sub 9 min. pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Got carried away Miles 3-8 and ran 8:20-8:30 pace, then paid for it the last 3 miles.

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Scott Suter reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: 2:15
Results: 2:17:12

General Summary:
It was a beautiful morning to have the race as the weather had been questionable the previous day. The trail was frozen with areas of light snow. Overall, the course was fun and enjoyable.

Things Done Right:
Paced myself well and didn’t go out too hard.

Things Done Wrong:
I thought I kept myself hydrated and fueled with gels, beans, etc., but I ended up cramping in my quads and hamstrings at about mile 11. Had to stop and stretch out a bit but was able to keep moving on.

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Diane L. Repasky reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 1:51:30
Results: 1:51:37
Website: http://www.platteriverhalf.com

General Summary:
Race run along the Platte River from Littleton to the Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant. Mostly bike paths, mostly flat course.

Things Done Right:
Training going as planned. Used this race as a long run for Boston and to see how my training was going. Right on target, hoping for a 3:45 in Boston. Dressed for the weather, carried the right amount of gels.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have drank more water this week and carbed up better but felt good after the race.

Any Other Stuff:
I know it is a public bike path but there were a lot of close calls with bikes going way to fast and runners trying to pass and almost getting taken out.

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Umstead 100 ultramarathon — Umstead State Park, NC — March 31 - April 1, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: PR
Results: barely. 22:41:42
Website: http://www.umstead100.org

General Summary:
I was hoping to run this race under 21 hours, however, not having a crew made it tough, as I kept having to go inside the main lodge to get my gels, food, etc. However, despite the heat and blisters, I managed a PR by about 15 minutes. Not as good as I was hoping, but still a PR. I think having good crew as compared to pacers, which can actually distract you, is very important. More important than pacers. This was a training run for the Badwater Double I am running in july.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t do the drop bag thing at any of the other aid stations other than the main race headquarters. If I have a drop bag at an aid station, I tend to stop and get something out of it, weather I need to or not and waste a lot of time. Brought along lots of “ultra-crack,” Little Debbies, and devil music to listen to, which kept me going and in a semi-decent mood.

Things Done Wrong:
Went into the race tired. Didn’t do anything close to even splits on the eight loops that the course consists of; what the hell happened?!Forgot electroltyes during the hottest part of the day and got dehydrated. Wore old shoes. Really bonked on the second to last loop. Didn’t recover well, as I had to drive eight hours to PA five hours later, and ended up getting lost in the bad part of Washington DC for three hours. Life was definetly not dull!

Any Other Stuff:
Umstead State Park is beautiful.Lots of flowering vines and trees. You can smell the wisteria in the air. It is very runnable, but the endless climbs will catch up with you later in the race if you don’t watch it earlier. Sadly, the park is being surrounded with more stupid oversized houses being built. The sound of birds was replaced with bulldozers in some areas, much like what is happening in Manitou, with people moving into superficial “McLofts” with concrete parking garages, and all the waste and greed associated with it.

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Rockin K Trail Runs — Kanopolis State Park, Kansas — April 07, 2007

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Run 50 miles
Results: Finished
Website: http://www.ksultrarunners.info/rkpage.html

General Summary:
Technical single track trails, 1st mile is on pavement. Two loops for the 50 milers; 1st loop of 26.4 loop for marathoners had snow, ice and 18 degree temps. Rocky with steep, short ups and downs, creek crossings and one river crossing up to my belly.
2nd loop is mainly the same with a cut-off at mile 36 to remove 2 miles from the course so the 50 milers run 50.77 miles. with warming into the low 40s, the trails became muddy, slippery and sometimes a quagmire.

Things Done Right:
Ran 50 miles...finished.

Kept my sense of humor and enjoyed the run

Things Done Wrong:
Lots of stuff. My camelback tube froze before I even had my first sip and it didn’t free up till mile 20.
Ran the first loop with some marathoners and probably ran the 1st loop a little fast.
Got lost on the second loop in the first mile. I ran this 5 hours earlier, how stupid!
Should have eaten more at the manned aid station that we pass 4 times.

Any Other Stuff:
At the finish was chili a warm fire and beer.

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Greenland Trail 25K — Greenland Open Space, Larkspur, CO — April 14, 2007

Jason Callegari reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: 2:00
Results: 2:05 Website: http://www.greenland50k.com/

General Summary:
The Greenland Open Space was a beautiful location for the start of the trail running season. The trails were covered with a fresh dusting of snow which quickly turned to mud for the 2nd lap of the course. The terrain was relatively mellow with a number of rolling hills.

Things Done Right:
Ran slow because I knew I didn’t have the appropriate training in order to really compete in the race. Was mentally tough on the hills and in the mud which slowed the course as the day warmed.

Things Done Wrong:
Ate a hefty dose of Mexican food the night before which caused some stomach discomfort for the first half of the race. Got stuck in the back of the group at the start forcing me to weave my way through the maze of runners for the first 2 miles.

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Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: Under 1:51:00
Results: 1:50:51, 3rd overall, 1st masters
Website: http://www.greenland50k.com/

General Summary:
I wanted to run faster than last year and preferably better than 8th place. Had the rangers felt the running conditions were unfavorable, the race would have been cancelled. Fortunately we didn’t get as much snow as anticipated.

I went out comfortably the first lap and held it fairly well throughout. The first 3 miles or so had a small amount of snow — 1-2” at most — but nothing to really slow us down much. After the third we started to climb and found several most inches of snow which significantly slowed us all down. Until we got to the top of the hills did we have better conditions to run. I ran steadily until the turn around for the second lap in 6th place overall when I saw only two other runners making the turn around. The rest were running the 8 mile and were on the way to the finish line. The two ahead were in the 25K like me, one being Daryn Parker and the other Dave Mackey. Little chance of catching them.

The second lap started uneventfully and as I made my turn around, Tony Krupicka made his turn for the 50K. I ran behind him for most of the first 3 miles then passed him for a few minutes before he passed me on the hills. The snow was tramped down but we then had to contend with mud in certain areas, although it never got too bad during the second loop. We pretty much ran together until about a mile and half to the finish when I figured I’d better pick it up to finish hard. For most of the second lap there was a runner gaining, which I figured was another 25K runner. Turned out to be Johannes Rudolph of Boulder in the 50K. I was able to leave him once I started picking it up.

I finished nice and strong and felt good afterwards. A few seconds faster than last year but on a course that was definitely slower. I think I could have at least run another 2 or 3 minutes faster had the trail conditions been better but I’m please with my performance. It means something is going right with the beginning of the season.

Things Done Right:
I found that eating a few granola bars before the race allows me to fuel up nicely without the heavy feeling some other foods cause. So, I did just that.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much, just a little warm during the second lap.

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Rick Isaac reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: 2:40:00
Results: 2:40:03

General Summary:
Beautiful day and setting for a run. Trail was snow packed w/ decent footing first loop. Footing was slippery and sloppy on 2nd loop. Good long run as this was longest run in 18+ years, after a hard week of training w/ 1/1 hard easy on Mon., Farlek run of 65 min. on Tue. and Tempo run on Thur.

Things Done Right:
Started conservatively. Only 1 runner passed me on second loop. Worked on brisk walking technique up a couple of the hills on second loop, esp. where there was poor footing.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t get a good night's sleep the night before race and didn’t eat a good meal the night before. Took kids to McDonalds and wasn’t thinking about race next morning. Back of Left shoulder really started hurting at 5 mile mark. Didn’t reach goal of negative split — Ran second half, plus 1:40.

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Greenland Trail 50K — Greenland Open Space, Larkspur, CO — April 14, 2007

John Cassidy reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Finish
Results: Finished

General Summary:
Race began with 100% snow coverage, ending with 0% coverage — looked like a different world. 4 laps of about 8 miles each. 1st lap was snowy, 2nd&3rd were muddy, 4th was dry.

Swag:
Tech shirt
Medal
Socks
Heed
Pizza & Beer

Things Done Right:
Paid for it so I wouldn’t find an excuse not to run. Did not stop after 3 laps when other were finishing.
Rick Crawford helped me acting as crew chief — he was there for Anita

Things Done Wrong:
Got low on water and was pushing thick blood. 1/2 hour after finishing my heart rate was still 120.
DRINK MORE WATER

Any Other Stuff:
Some guy was playing Paul Revere and running his horse along the course. Upon hearing the horse approaching from behind I thought, “That sounds like Matt.” Heavy breather, fast approaching speed = Matt

Amy Moore was a volunteer

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 K
Goal: Beat previous time of 4:49:58
Results: 4:06:55
Website: http://www.coloradorunnermag.com/results/Greenland_2007.html

General Summary:
Trail races located at the Greenland Open Spaces trail area. The 50K race is 4 loops on the Greenland Trail loop.

Things Done Right:
Once again, this was a long training run and I did not taper for this event, but I did take the previous day off. The first time I ran this race I went out too fast and it killed my race. This time I paced myself and did run the entire race while slowing a little on each lap. Hydrated well.

Things Done Wrong:
Everything went well.

Any Other Stuff:
There was concern of snow and mud like the 2005 race, but there was not very much snow. It did get muddier during the subsequent loops, but not nearly as bad as 2005. The starting temperature was around 30 degrees, which was perfect.

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Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: 5 hours
Results: 5 hours 17 min

General Summary:
Gorgeous day for a long run. Race directors were thinking of postponing the race for 2 weeks due to the snow and cold that was predicted, but didn’t need to. This is a loop course and runners could choose between 1 loop (8 miles), 2 loops (25K) or 4 loops (50K). I felt the event was well organized, the 50K-ers got a nice canvas tote bag along with the OK high-tech white shirt. Heed was the drink offered at the aid stations.

Things Done Right:
Showed up, kept moving forward, soaked up some sun, splashed in the mud, finished. Learned a lot about what I need to do before the San Juan Solstice! Wore trail shoes (along with my new gaiters) that were 1/2 size bigger and my feet were happy!

Things Done Wrong:
Probably overdressed. My original plan was to wear shorts, long-sleeved shirt and tie a jacket around my waist, but when we left home it was 19 degrees at the AFA so figured it was going to be COLD. The sun was shining and no wind, so it was warm enough for shorts. Started out too fast (felt really good on the first 2 loops), passed several women who ended up passing me on the 4th loop. Didn’t get enough fuel in during the run. Haven’t done enough long trail runs to be ready for this distance.

Any Other Stuff:
Good training run. Even though it was 4 loops, it didn’t require as many mental gymnastics as I expected. The aid station volunteers were wonderful. We were really fortunate with the weather.

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Tom Kelecy reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Finish in less than 5 days
Results: finished in 0.2159722222222222222222222222 days
Website: http://www.greenland50k.com/

General Summary:
Others have provided a pretty good description of the course and weather description in their previous R reports. I was hoping to run more even paces than I did (first 2 fast, the third slower, the fourth a forced march). I definitely noticed when I exceeded my longest previous run of the season (26 miles). The concept of training like you plan to race certainly has some merit, at least as much as possible/practical where distance is involved.

Things Done Right:
Took a gel at each of the 2 aid stations (one at 3.5 miles and the other at around 7 miles). Used a handteen bottle which made it easier to drink more regularly, something I knew I needed to work on doing from previous longer races.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably ran the first 2 laps too fast. Might have done a little better spacing a few well placed walking breaks earlier. Ended up walking 1-2 miles of the last loop. Should have done more training on the course ahead of time. Also, should have used sunscreen on my arms.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice shirt, and there was a lot of good food afterwards, though I didn’t have much of an appetite (too full of gel).

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Horsetooth Half Marathon — Fort Collins — April 15, 2007

Julie Denise Crist reports:
Distance: Half Marathon
Goal: 2:20:00
Results: 2:08:57
Website: http://www.horsetoothhalfmarathon.com/

General Summary:
This was my first half marathon, actually it was the longest distance I have ever run. (Prior to that it was 11 miles)

Things Done Right:
I trained well and kept a good attitude.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t keep the best diet.

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Boston Marathon — Boston — April 16, 2007

Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Finish in the top 10 overall; backup goal — finish faster than last year
Results: 4571st place; I achieved the second goal, time 3:26:12, 5 minutes faster than 2006.
Website: http://www.bostonmarathon.org/

General Summary:
It was a dark and stormy night...

The forecast for Monday’s run was not much better.

The most up-to-date weather forecast calls for a predicted Spring storm on Monday, including heavy rains (potentially 3 to 5 inches), with the start temperatures in the mid to upper 30’s. Wind will likely be East (in the face of the participants for most of the race) in the 20 to 25 mile per hour range, with gusts to as much as 50 miles per hour. This will produce a wind chill index of 25 to 30-degrees Fahrenheit.

There was a steady hard rain all day Sunday, Sunday evening and Monday morning walking to and waiting for the bus. On the bus ride to Hopkinton we went through a heavy downpour. By the time I got off the bus, the rain had slowed down some. A large number of us huddled under a large tent in an attempt to stay dry and warm before the race. It was still raining during the walk to the starting line and during the wait for the gun to sound. However, by the time the race started, the rain had slowed to a light drizzle. And shortly into the race, the rain stopped! It only lightly sprinkled a couple times during the first half of the race. The road was dry by the end of the race! The temperature was in the low 40’s. Nearly perfect running conditions. There must have been a head wind since the lead Kenyan was off of his time by 7 minutes from the previous year. Still I was 5 minutes faster than last year.

It was another dark and stormy night...
It rained very hard Tuesday in the Boston area.

Wow. What a great time!

Things Done Right:
I dressed properly for the weather. I was able to stay warm and dry before the race. I was able to strip down to a comfortable level for the near perfect running weather. My shoes felt dry during the entire race!

Things Done Wrong:
I set my primary goal to big.

Any Other Stuff:
Although the crowd was still out in large numbers, I concentrated on the run. Boston is a tough course with the hills. My legs were trashed the last four miles.
A great experience. I will be back next year.

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Christa Lloyd reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: run fast & have fun
Results: 3:23
Website: http://www.baa.org

General Summary:
What an awesome race! Not a trail race, but the history, enthusiasm, and gorgeous course make for a memorable race. Of course, my first year running involved a good steady rain and a headwind, but the puddle splashing added a bit of fun. The temp was around 45 at the start.

Things Done Right:
I abandoned my goal of running a PR when I heard the weather forecasts and just went out to have fun. Good decision, as I would have been disappointed otherwise, but I only ran 4 min. slower than my PR. Smeared Vaseline on feet beforehand and didn’t even have any hotspots. Having oatmeal cooked for me on the stovetop that morning was a nice touch, too!

Things Done Wrong:
Wore a windbreaker throughout the race, which added to my wind resistance--but not much, and it definitely helped keep me warm and relatively dry. I probably could have done without, though.
I also decided to take my orthotics out of my shoes-- BAD idea. The extra 1/4-inch of lift they provide does make a difference, and my calves started hurting at mile 6. By mile 22 my legs felt like 2x4’s, and it was all I could do to focus on just keeping them in motion. What a newbie mistake...

Any Other Stuff:
I would recommend that every runner do this race. There is something going on every step of the way--I don’t think there was a spot on the course without someone cheering. The women at Wellesly were amazing, and I had to grin at the college kids with kegs in their yards and beer in hand yelling for the runners. The race really is more than just another marathon, and I think everyone should experience it!

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Diane L. Repasky reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:45:00 before I saw the weather report
Results: 3:56:26
Website: http://www.bostonmarathon.org

General Summary:
It’s Boston! Hopkinton to Boston. It’s amazing all 26.2 miles of it!

Things Done Right:
I trained hard and I trained smart all thru this nasty winter and spring. I ran lots of miles on the treadmill and just as many out in the cold and snow. I carb loaded and drank lots of water. I ate a good diet.

Things Done Wrong:
Mother Nature! You can’t change the weather so you just get out there and do the best you can. It was better than predicted and I probably overdressed but was glad I had a wind/water resistant jacket. The wind and rain mostly had stopped by the start of the second wave but picked up again around Natick. It was nasty for about 15 minutes or so and the jacket came in handy. The wind got increasingly stronger as you approached Boston. The hills I am used to but it’s where you hit them in Boston, miles 16 to about 21 when you get to the top of Heartbreak Hill. That’s a great feeling getting to the top of that. Then it’s mostly downhill into Boston but by then your hamstrings and quads are aching and the cold and dampness has made them not want to work like they should. Athletes Village had several inches of standing water out on the fields so you were wet from the start. My feet felt like 2 ice cubes for about the first mile or so. Hard to get stretched out and warmed up. My first time so it w as all kinda overwhelming the way they herd you to the start. Afraid of missing a port-a-potty opportunity, trying to find my coral, etc... Stayed on the busses as long as they would let us.

Any Other Stuff:
Boston is amazing, the crowds of people cheering you on makes it all worthwhile. I did a Marathon tour the day before so I knew what landmarks to look for which was fun. The Wellsley Girls are so much fun, you can hear them cheering so far out and it seems to go on forever. The ground actually trembles from their cheers. It was a hectic weekend with weather on both ends, flight delays and almost cancellations(getting there),worries about race day, possible hypothermia with earlier reports of the weather. Now that it is over I can’t wait to go back and do it again. It was very emotional, I fought tears as I crossed both the start and the finish lines. Tears of happiness because I never thought I would make it to Boston.

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Springs Desert Ultra — Fruita Colorado — April 21, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 5 hours
Results: sucked!

General Summary:
Scenic course. Great trail run, if you like technical rocky trails.

Things Done Right:
Found lots of good food out on the trail! One of my many stupid coping mechanisms for dealing with a race course I struggle with is not to eat during the race. That way I can hopefully feel so bad that I quit. But I don’t quit, so this is a really stupid, pointless thing to do. I got so hungry and wasted that I ended up picking up food that other runners dropped on the trail, which really helped my energy levels. It is amazing what you can find if you are running along at a snails pace. For example, I found bunches of dark chocolate M&M’s around mile 14. Judging by the colors of them, they were obviously left-over Easter candy that some evil parent probably robbed from some poor child’s Easter basket. I poured a little water on them to get the sand and grit off, and they were just fine. I’d say I had about 200 calories of M&M’s during the race, that I found on the ground. Later though, I really hit the jackpot. Sharkeys! I love Sharkeys, and there were four in perfect conditio n laying besides the trail just a

mile later. A little spit to get the dust off, and down the hatch. But the trail gods weren’t done bestowing their blessings on me yet. As I neared the final aid station, I spied something red lying in a clump of grass. Was it a broken piece of a bike reflector, or could it be a Jolly Rancher? You guessed it...it was a Jolly Rancher, and cherry flavor, my favorite! A passing cyclist looked at me as I bent over and picked it up, with a look on his face that said, “you’re not actually going to eat that are you?” I asked him if it belonged to him, and he said no. Then I ate it.( the Jolly Rancher, not the cyclist)Now all I wanted was some Gold Fish crackers. I also wanted five million dollars in my bank account, a 23 inch waist, and peppy 36C’s but I couldn’t find any of that on the last six miles of the race, so I probably won’t be running this race again!

Things Done Wrong:
Have you ever had one of those races where you try and cover up your running number as you approach the finish so that the announcer can’t tell who you are and say your name over the speakers for all of humanity to hear just how bad you sucked? That pretty much sums up my race.

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Copper Crawl 13K — Miami, AZ — April 22, 2007

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 13K
Goal: Course Record
Results: 55:30 (CR)
Website: http://www.miamiboomtownspree.org

General Summary:
The Copper Crawl races are a part of the Boomtown Spree local to Miami, AZ. Miami is a town adjacent to Globe, AZ known for its copper mining. The Boomtown Spree has 3 running events, the Copper Crawl 5k and 13k and the Keystone Stair Climb. Since all three were scheduled to start at the same time my plan was to run the 13k. The 13k gains 1500 ft above the town of Miami and then drops back down to the city. The 5k does the first 1.2 miles of uphill on the 13k course and then travels along the ridge for a little while before dropping back down into the town for the finish.

I left on Friday night due to a 7:15am start the next morning. Camped outside of Superior, AZ at the Oak Creek Campground in Queen Creek Canyon. The next morning I woke and it was pouring rain! I assumed the races would be run rain or shine, so I arrived at 6:15am at the staging area.

I joined the race organizers huddled underneath a canopy discussing whether to postpone due to the rain. I was rather shocked about this considering that I had never run a race that was canceled/postponed due to weather, especially rain. The word was that it would be postponed until 1:30pm. I figured this might turn out ok, because I could run the Keystone Stair Climb that traditionally was run during the same time as the Copper Crawl. While waiting for the stair climb I decided to run some of the course to get a sense of what the first couple miles would be like. I was impressed at the grade as the first mile went from a start at 5% gradually increasing to around 10% with an eventual 15% grade as it left the paved road.

The stair climb, postponed till 10:00am, only gains a couple hundred feet and the record was 45 seconds. It’s essentially stairs in the town that climbs up a hill to access homes further up on the hill instead of having to take the switchbacks on the road. The record for my age group, 30-39, was 55 seconds. It’s run as a time trial, one person at a time. I figured I would take a shot at it since I had the time. I took a strategy of a moderate effort to half way and all out for the rest of the time. When my turn came around I followed the plan and towards the top pushed to the limit. This execution ended up giving me a 48 second time. This was enough to break the age group but not the course record.

Finally 1pm came around and I started warming up for the 13k. The course record for the 13kat the staging area was advertised at 57:58. The 5k and 13k started off together with the firing of a pistol. A local track and cross country runners took the lead from the start. We started heading up the road. When the 10% grade started Adam Hunt took the lead. Adam is a local Phoenix runner that specializes in hill/mountain runs marathon and under. I followed directly behind. Adam put on surge and I let him gap me about 15 yards. He when we left the road and began our 15% grade Adam faded. Sensing weakness I kept the same pace passing him and gapping about 20 yards. The 5Kers were behind a ways at this point. After the 5k turnoff the course went back to around 6%. Adam maintained about a 20-30 yard deficit. I had a real issue concentrating at this juncture, but I knew that I needed to put the race away on the uphill. Finally after about a mile of 6% I was able to focus and start pushing hard. I ended up putting at le ast a minute on Adam by the turnaround. The downhill was fast and furious and I ended up adding to the lead. Past a few 5Kers at the bottom and finished at 55:30. This was good enough to break the course record. Adam came in two minutes later also under the course record. Third place was a local track runner slightly above the course record, but underneath an hour.

Things Done Right:
Race preparation, training

Things Done Wrong:
Went a little fast at the beginning

Any Other Stuff:
Received a $50 gift certificate to REI for 1st place

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Free State Trail Runs (26.2m/40m/100k) — Lawrence, Kansas — April 28, 2007

Darrell Weaver reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi.
Goal: Finish
Results: I finished (4:09:16)
Website: http://psychowyco.com

General Summary:
Three trail races were run simultaneously on a 21 mile loop course. Single-track trail through dense woods,winding along a lake shore. A lot of up and down, short-steep stuff. The trail was well-marked and over all, a little rough: fist-sized rocks and roots and a lot of slippery, shoe-sucking, sticky clay mud, often ankle-deep. Some water crossings. Weather was sunny and warm.

Things Done Right:
I hadn’t run a marathon in 12 years or over 15 miles in the last year, so I took it out slow and tried to run with even effort overall.

Drank a lot, pushing the fluids, 4-5 water-bottles, since it was very warm.

Things Done Wrong:
I considered this a training run (in conjunction with a family trip-to get my Sunday IC *) so I guess nothing went wrong, although my finish time was pretty miserable. On the other hand, it was good to get a reminder early in the season how much the Ascent will hurt, so I can prepare for it.

Any Other Stuff:
Contrary to common belief, Kansas is not all flat, and there are some pretty gnarly trail runs back there. Check out Bad Ben’s psychowyco.com website.

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Pine Line Marathon — Medford, WI — April 28, 2007

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Collect state #44, under 4 at least, maybe even under 3:40
Results: 3:47:47
Website: http://www.centralwinews.com/starnews/news4.html

General Summary:
A very low key, no frills event. Pine Line is a rail to trails trail: out & back course, flat and straight on a dirt surface mostly good footing. Head wind going out, got a bit warm last few miles. Aid stations adequate (some folks complained not enough of them, plenty for me, fruit was nice. No gels or the like).

First mile maker was at 1.2 miles it said: 25 miles to go, the countdown followed. In the early miles I would rather know how far I had gone, not how much was left, but was nice when it got down to 3-2-1 mile(s) to go.

Worn incline shirt which lead to running with couple from Canada for a number of miles: Gay is doing the double and Mike the ascent - they had lots of questions. I told them not bad - only 1 hill ;-). I also told them to buy Matt and Jim’s book (waiting for my commission check :-).

Things Done Right:
Effort level about right, even splits until about mile 23. Good focus. Had good training base, so not sure why faded a bit at end.

Things Done Wrong:
Not relaxed during first 5-6 miles, not sure why I took so long to get in flow. Faded last 2-3 miles: was it heat, wind, not relaxed enough. Maybe need to warm up a little.

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Big Sur International Marathon — Carmel, CA — April 29, 2007

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 3
Results: 3:09
Website: http://www.bsim.org/

General Summary:
The Big Sur International Marathon is advertised as the “most scenic marathon.” Yes, it is spectacular as it winds along the rugged California coast from the pseudo-town of Big Sur northwards for 26 miles to the art gallery mecca of Carmel. Viewing the coast and the spectacular homes and occasional beaches in slow motion for better than three hours one gains a splendid appreciation its beauty. Though I’ve now run 83 marathons, the marathon distance is still daunting and though it was as close to sea level as one will ever get the repetitive rolling hills took its toll… I ran the entire distance, but the final six miles were in excess of 7 minutes each with at least one poking above 8 minutes. There was one overly long uphill that took us from about mile 11 to the halfway point on the famous Bixby Bridge. To add to the fun we ran into a stiff headwind on this 2-mile uphill. Fortunately I found someone willing to trade drafting advantages up this long slog. I had bought a $25 pair of sunglasses i n the expo which is about the high end of what I will willingly pay for sunglasses because they were advertised as “anti-fog.” Well, let me tell you in the fog and low clouds we ran through on this Sunday they fogged up and I had to stash them in my back pocket.

Rebekka and I rounded out our “mini-vacation” with a wonderful two days with miles of walking in San Francisco, including up and over Nob Hill, Russian Hill, Telegraph Hill (Coit Tower) and along the Embarcadero and China Town then back to Cathedral Hill.

Things Done Right:
Ran the whole way.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran too hard on the early downhills.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a must run for every marathon tourist. Spectacular scenery and very interesting course.

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Collegiate Peaks Trail Run 25 Miler — Buena Vista, CO — May 05, 2007

Marilyn Goodloe reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: Under 4:30
Results: 4:24:13
Website: http://collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
Beautiful trail run on the east side of Buena Vista climbing to 9400 feet. Outstanding views of the Collegiate Peaks. 25 milers do one loop. 50 milers do the 25 mile loop as well and then turn and do the loop counter clockwise. Today the weather turned out to be perfect. We had overcast skies and cool temps.

Things Done Right:
Did not go out too fast. Ate well the day before and the morning of. Hydrated early and often during the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably could have tapered a little more. Just took off one day from my normal training schedule.

Any Other Stuff:
I highly recommend this race for those training for PPM and/or ultras. It’s a good run early in the season to get you used to distance trail races, but it doesn’t tear you up. You can recover quickly and get right back into training.

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William Keller reports:
Distance: 25M
Goal: 5:00 hours
Results: 4:58:14
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
My first trail run over 20M and on unfamiliar territory. Also the first trail race since (my lame newbie finishes in) the PPRR Fall Series. Many thanks to Ted Bidwell, Gordon Barnett, Tim Edwards and Rich Muzzy for course briefings and confidence building in advance of the run. Beat my goal time, barely but finished strong and no bonk. Overall was 88th but not sure how many entrants there were (maybe around 200?) in the 25M. Given where I am in my running training, I (started late last year) I was pretty happy about completing this distance. Could’ve given just a little more, but that is only hindsight.

Things Done Right:
Trained with Incline Club all winter to get my mileage up and get consistent about the long runs!

Stayed hydrated with grape Cytomax (I’m picky about my fluids) the first 1/2 and switched over to water and gels (caffeinated Gu and crank e-gel) for the last half. Since I am not a caffeine consumer, those gu’s made a huge difference to me. Also used Saltstick pills to keep electrolytes up. Never felt like I would bonk or was running down. Ate banana halves at 11.7 and 21.8.

Started out slower than the pack for the first climb that put me +3:00 on my first split, but came in with negative splits except for power walking the long climb out of the valley (see things done wrong). I was able to make it up on the downhills between 18M and the finish. Paying attention to the splits helped me beat my goal, even if only by a little bit.

Didn’t need the first aid station and was running behind, so I picked up about 10 places there. Never saw most of that gaggle again. Longest aid stop was for water to wash down a gel and fill my platypus pack was around 1:30. The others were about 30 seconds each.

Was pleased to pass about 10 people in the last 5 miles, with only 2 of those on the 50M route.

Everything used in the race had been tested in training runs and thus no surprises. I did go out on a limb with having run only about 15M in new shoes, but was blister free and they felt great (Sportiva Fireblades).

Things Done Wrong:
Since this was a new distance and course, I had no firm idea where I could push or where I needed to hold back. I ran at an avg HR of only 77%, which was below my goal rate to keep it at 80%. I beat my time goal but finished with a little bit in the tank despite running in from around 18M to the finish. Will be thinking about where I could’ve expended that energy for next year. Probably that second long uphill out of the valley between aid stations 3 and 4 at 14.6M and 17.9M respectively. I can get 12 minutes there if I alternate run/walk a lot more. Combine that with seasonal improvement for next year and other negative splits from this year and I should be able to get into the 4:30 to 4:40 range. We’ll see!

Any Other Stuff:
Overall weather was cloudy with intermittent spits of flakes in the first two hours to partly sunny with temps varying from 30-45ish and a light wind. 5 aid stations (5.7M, 11.7M, 14.6M, 17.9M and 21.8M) were stocked with halved bananas, cookies, pretzels, chips, water and Gatorade. Volunteers were very helpful and friendly and got a bunch of thanks from everyone. Thanks to Anita Fromm’s recent race report, every pretzel, jelly bean, chip and gummi bear I saw on the ground I wondered if she would pick up.

The course was a loop east of Buena Vista on a combination of established 4 wheeler, fire roads and singletrack. The profile involves about 2500 total feet of climbing, but after seeing the rollers versus the profile, I’d bump that to 3,000’. Maybe it just felt that way. There is a fairly continuous rolling climb through the first 12 miles, then a descent followed by another climb, then a gradual downhill (with a few arroyos thrown in where the RR used to have a bridge to flat railroad grade. At the very end, it drops into a steep descent and singletrack along the river, with a bridge crossing to the finish at the community center.

This run is part of the Trailrunner Trophy series and has The North Face as the main corporate sponsor.

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: Good training run for spring and summer ultras
Results: Finished; didn’t race and ran an extra 5 miles after
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
Wanted to use this as a long training run. Ran 25 in 4:09 and went out for 50+ minutes to get a 5 hour run on my legs.

Things Done Right:
Started conservative and walked the early steep hills and ran the two long gentle climbs later in the course.

Things Done Wrong:
For a change stayed within my running plan.

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Gordon reports:
Distance: 25 Miles
Goal: 5 Hour Training Run
Results: 5:12
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
Loop course (clockwise 25, ccw 50) through the foothills north and east of Buena Vista. Although the weather threatened, we lucked out (at least those of us running the 25 ‘fun race’) with only a few brief periods of blowing snow pellets. The wind gradually intensified throughout the day, making the 50 more challenging.

Things Done Right:
Treated this race as a long training run.

Prepared for adverse weather, tied a light tyvek jacket around my waste... didn’t need it.

Used a 10 oz hand-held hydration bottle with my own electrolyte solution, had the aid stations top it up with water only.

Vitamin “I” and micro brews at the finish.

Stayed to cheer in the 50 mile finishers. Watched the amazing performances of winner TonyK (smashed both the old & new course records), HarryH (3rd) and RickH (5th).

Jonathan and Mary-Clare, Ted, Carole and I stayed over Saturday at Mt. Princeton Hot Springs to soak our weary bones.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing really.

A dormant Plantar Fasciitis reared its ugly head at mile 12 making the next 13 challenging painful.

Any Other Stuff:
Interesting discussion with Tom & Laura K post race about the lack of altitude training so far this season.

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Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: 3:45 — 4 hours
Results: 4:02

General Summary:
Nice event — you could choose from a 25 mile loop or turn around and do the loop the other direction for 50 miles. We had perfect weather in the morning: cloudy & cool, a light snow, then sunshine. The course is roly-poly enough to be runnable. You don’t go uphill so much that when a downhill section comes along, your muscles haven’t forgotten how to run downhill. Race proceeds benefitted the Optimist’s Club and all the volunteers were extremely friendly and encouraging.

Things Done Right:
Had a good taper week before the race. Much better pacing than at Greenland. I passed a few women in the early/middle of the race and they never passed me back! I tried to be a little more aggressive on the downhills and, miracle of miracles, no one passed me! I was running behind a guy who was doing the 50 and he had an excellent pace going so I figured I should try to stay with him since I got to quit at the turnaround/finish line and he had to turn around to do it again. Used this race as a hard training run enroute to the San Juan Solstice.

Things Done Wrong:
No speed training so my time was slower than I had hoped. This may sound like an excuse, but since I’m trying to prepare to finish a 50 miler, I’m trying to learn ultra pacing — it’s a totally different animal! I also need to figure out what to eat the night before — not beans!

Any Other Stuff:
Fun to see lots of Colo Spgs folks at this race. Can’t wait to read Anita’s R report...

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Tom Kelecy reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: Finish under 4 hours
Results: 3 hours 58 minutes
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
I’ve run both the 25 and 50 miler in the past and so sort of knew what to expect, though there were some new segments of trail they have incorporated since I last ran the 50 in the year 2000. There were pretty much 2 significant climbs in the 25, ranging from a low of 8,000’ at the start to a high point of around 9,400’, with a nice 6 miles of down-hill to the finish (last 1/4 to 1/2 mile to the finish/turnaround is a slight uphill). What I like about this course is that it’s not either “all up-hill” or “all down-hill"; you get some nice breaks in the varied terrain along the way. The weather was a concern the night before, but ended up being very nice with temps in the 50’s with a mix of clouds and sun, and an occasional light snow shower mixed in for ambience. There were moments when we had some awesome views of the higher peaks across the valley. Still lots of snow up higher.

Things Done Right:
Worked out the 4 hour finish split times at each of the 5 aid stations ahead of time, and stayed on a pace pretty close to those. Stayed well hydrated (Gatorade) and energized (gels). Didn’t over-dress for the weather conditions for once. Managed a pretty good taper the week or two before, with a cut-back on volume but maintaining intensity on the shorter runs.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much I can think of. Training a little more specific to this course and distance would have netted a better finish time, but this was designated a “training race” (for Lake City 50 miler).

Any Other Stuff:
Well organized race, and nice volunteers, but the entry fee was perhaps a little high ($60) for a 25 miler.

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Peter A. Tonsits reports:
Distance: 25 miles
Goal: Sub 4:30
Results: 4:44:16
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
All in all I felt reasonably good about the run despite not achieving my goal time. My training has been a little hit and miss thus far this year, so I’m not where I want to be yet. Took it out very easy....basically started slow and then tapered off....strategy was to run the first half slow and pick it up in the second half since I felt completely spent towards the end of this race in both 2004 & 2005. Ran easy and held back until hitting the 2:15:00 mark (half of my goal time) and then cranked it up from there all the way in. Picked up a ton of places from the 2:15:00 mark on and didn’t get passed myself the whole way in. May have either gone out too slow or waited too long to put the pedal to the metal because despite running hard from 2:15:00 on I was well off my overall goal. I guess I need to get a little more scientific next year and calculate what my splits should be from aid station to aid station to keep the race from getting away from me.

Things Done Right:
It’s definitely more fun to feel strong in the 2nd half of a race than it is to just fade and get passed left and right in the final miles. I was able to run many of the sections in the second half that I’ve normally struggled with in years past. Also hydrated well (maybe too well....see things done wrong). Did get in some nice long training runs for this race including two on very varied terrain which definitely helps on this up and down course. Also tapered well for this race as far as cutting back on running (not so much on sleep though....again see things done wrong.)

Things Done Wrong:
Did not get nearly enough sleep the week leading up to the race, including a 3am alarm the morning of in order to make the drive from Colorado Springs to Buena Vista for the 6:30am start. I need to try staying overnight in Buena Vista next year as I think the drive is a little stressful and takes quite a bit out of me. I need to drink my fluids well before the start of the race and then give my body time to process it..... had to make 5 pit-stops in the first 2:15:00 and just one in the second 2:29:16.

Any Other Stuff:
It was great seeing the turnout from Incliners! We were very well represented! The views from the course are spectacular especially on years when the sun is out, and if you’re not running Boston in mid-April you should be up here running this in early May!

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Collegiate Peaks Trail Run 50 Miler — Buena Vista, CO — May 05, 2007

Timothy Edwards reports:
Distance: 50 miles (turned into 25)
Goal: finish my 1st 50 mile race
Results: finished 25 just before the 50 cutoff, stayed put

General Summary:
It was fun trying!
My left knee gave me trouble at mile 15 and never let up. I finished the 25 mile loop (at 5h:40m), an hour past my goal, but I am happy that I kept running and finished 25 miles.

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated and fed, tried to stay warm.

Things Done Wrong:
My pace was too slow for the cutoff time for running the 50 mile loop.

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: under 8:00
Results: 7:43:20
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
25 miles loop course in the mountains surrounding Buena Vista. The course is primarily 4 wheel drive road with great views of the Collegiate Peaks mountain range.

Things Done Right:
Another long training run, although I did take the previous day off prior to the race. I took my time knowing that any troubles that I would have would be during the second loop and the 7-8 mile hill that starts that second loop. I hydrated well and ran a smart race.

Things Done Wrong:
If this was a serious race for me, then I would have tapered for it. Since it wasn’t, I did have some soreness in my legs early in the race and that prevented me from catching the 2nd place runner in the end.

Any Other Stuff:
Once again, great cooler temperatures at the start with a few snow flurries during the race. The course was in very good shape.

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Barry Oelrich reports:
Distance: 50 (turned into 25)
Goal: 9 hrs
Results: 5:30’ish 25 mile
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
A loop course. The first loop is ran clockwise and has a nice mix of up’s and down’s. Great views of the Ark valley to the west. A loop course. The first loop is ran clockwise and has a nice mix of up’s and down’s. A couple short steeper climbs. Great views of the Ark valley to the west.

Things Done Right:
This was to be my first ultra. I trained well and had built up a great mileage base. I did my last long hard run two weeks ago, tappered, went in feeling very fresh and strong. I’ve been training on a trail which is much more technical and has more climbing than the CPTR course. First 12 miles, I kept too my plan of run/walking the flat sections, walking the hills and running the downhills.

Things Done Wrong:
Injured my knee during the race, had to walk/limp to the finish from the 11.7 mile aid station. (Bashed my right knee against the top tube of bike while scouting the course the weekend prior, may have weakened my knee and it wasn’t able to take running the downhills after the first 10 miles of the race). I could run the flats okay, the uphills there was no pain at all, but I could barely walk downhill. Maybe LCL strain/tear? I’ll find out later this week. Pulled from the race at the 25 mile finish.

Any Other Stuff:
I wanted to thank the nice women who let me use her compression band on my knee, the results have not posted so I don’t know her name. Also thanks to the “Angie’s” who let me run with them the final three miles, you girls kept my mind off my knee, thanks.

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Anton Krupicka reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Win, break 7hrs
Results: Won, 6:53:18
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
I entered this race after not being able to run my planned last two races (American River 50 and Zane Grey 50) because of a recalcitrant hamstring. I’d been eyeing this race for the past couple years, though, and had actually planned on it being my first ultra a year ago, so I was happy to come check out the course---plus, I love the Buena Vista area.

The night before the race was a little woolly as I picked up a friend from a concert in Denver after 10pm and then drove to Buena Vista through intermittent snowstorms in the mountains southwest of Denver. In the end, we weren’t snuggled down into our sleeping bags in Buena Vista’s city park until nearly 1:30am, which meant that I only got four hours of sleep. Good training for the upcoming Bighorn 100, I guess (with its ridiculous 11am start, I’ll certainly be running through the night with some sleep deprivation).

Anyways, the race course itself consisted of a rolling 25 mile loop of mostly jeep roads and ATV trails starting and finishing down by the river at Buena Vista’s Community Center. The 25 mile runners did one clockwise loop, while the 50 milers finished up with a counterclockwise loop, essentially doing an out-and-back. Overall, the 50 milers had about 5000’ of climbing with a high point around 9400’ that offered incredible views of the Collegiate Peaks across the valley.

I started off at a relaxed pace with Harry Harcrow, Rick Hessek, and Tania Pacev on the initial, flat 2.7 mile portion of mostly paved road. At this point, there were at least a dozen runners in front of us---mostly 25 milers---but I was surprised at how quickly people were starting. Once we hit the gravel, though, and the road turned uphill, most of the chatting stopped and I started to quickly move through the pack. After a fun, winding section of ATV trail, I caught up with Paul Sullivan and we climbed gently to the first aid station at 5.7 miles in a relaxed 50 minutes. Sully caught back up to me on the downhill after the aid station, but then had to make a pit stop and I fell in with Jeff Beuche of Montrail (he was doing the 25 miler after apparently having a rough time out at the Fruita 50 a couple weeks ago). We ran together for quite a while on a gentle climb until I had to stop and pee, but I caught up to him and another runner on a very steep climb after the creek crossing. We chatted some more unti l we hit the next aid station (11.7 miles) in 1:36 and he dropped me on a long, extended downhill.

This downhill continued to the 14.6 mile aid station (1:58) when a 3.5 mile climb to the high point of the course started. Someone on an ATV told me I was in 6th place at the bottom of this climb, but I passed two runners on the very runnable grade (there were actually a couple short, super steep sections) and topped out at the 17.9 mile aid station in 2:30. From here it was a long, long downhill that even had some nice sections of singletrack where I passed another runner to move into 3rd place overall (out of the 25 milers), and then I just ran as comfortably as possible down a long section of gravel road, onto a riverside trail, and then across the river and up into the parking lot to finish the first loop in 3:23.

I grabbed five more gels and a full water bottle at the turnaround and took off back up the trail to start the 7 mile climb back up to the course’s high point. My legs were definitely a little tired as I started the second loop, but I got into a nice rhythm on the gravel road and was still moving pretty well on the first sections of singletrack. However, the last couple of miles of climbing to the 32.1 mile aid station were tough. The sun was coming out and the road was just plain steep. It wasn’t a terrible climb, but it definitely took it out of me to the point that I wasn’t able to run quite as hard as I’d wanted to on the next 3.5 mile downhill section. Eventually, though, the legs loosened up and I got moving pretty well until the 35.4 mile aid station when the course turned back uphill again.

This was the part of the race that was the hardest. I was by myself and the next 5-6 miles had a lot of ups and downs with some really steep ups and downs that did a great job of making me feel like crap. However, with about an hour left in the race there was an extended gradual downhill that did a lot to get me rolling again, and when I got to the last aid station (44.3 miles), I downed a cup of Heed and was able to run pretty hard over the fairly technical ATV trails to the last three miles on the paved road. This last section was straight into a headwind and it started snowing/sleeting, but all in all it was a decent run. My legs were pretty shot immediately after finishing, but a couple hours later I was getting back to normal. Also, there was a lot of CRUD representation at the race; it was fun to see some familiar faces out there.

Things Done Right:
Carried a water bottle so I didn’t need to stop at hardly any aid stations. Only did an easy, flattish 2hrs the day after the race so that the recovery has been good. Ran the first few miles relaxed--didn’t get caught up in going out too fast.

Things Done Wrong:
Not sure. Maybe should’ve gotten more sleep the night before, but I don’t think that really affected my race. Should’ve stretched more immediately after the race.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a nice early season race. There were actually quite a few entrants, but with a big-name sponsor like The North Face it seems that the race could maybe come up with some decent prizes... couldn’t really see any evidence of TNF sponorship other than a big banner hanging in the community center. Overall, a fun race on a nice course.

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Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: sub-10
Results: 10:24:51
Website: http://collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
I used this as another training run for my upcoming Badwater Double. It was very cold and a snow storm greeted my dismally slow arrival to the finish, so no heat training. Either you train to race, or you race to train. I am definitely doing the latter.

Things Done Right:
Brought my own food and gels! There was little food to be found out on the trails, unlike my previous race in Fruita. I also wore long tights under my running shorts, which came in handy after my shorts fell off.

Things Done Wrong:
Wore old, decrepit running shorts. The drawstring to keep them in place broke 17 miles into the race. Time to rub on the “Fat Girl Slim Cream” on my butt. ( yes, there really is such a product!)

Any Other Stuff:
Great scenic course, beautiful and tough, friendly volunteers.

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Pilot Knob Trail Race — Forest City, Iowa / Pilot Knob State Park — May 5, 2007

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 15K
Goal: Maintain my status as a top 5 finisher here/ check the status of rehab of knee pain
Results: 5th overall; 1st in age group in 1:16:03
Website: http://www.pilotknobtrailrace.com/

General Summary:
Very beautiful and challenging course in a state park. I started rather reserved along with perennial winner, Chris Jensen (who finished 49th overall at Boston Marathon this year), and a couple other runners that usually put this race on their calendar. After the 1st mile I realized that I had better become more comfortable with my pace as I haven’t been able to run much lately due to knee pain caused by patello-femoral syndrome. I settled into a steady pace that I was able to maintain. A couple of times a runner would catch me from behind as I walked to relieve the tightness in my knees but I would pull away again when I recommenced the run. I was able to stay reserved in 5th place throughout the remainder of the race.

Things Done Right:
Ran the race in a manner to help assess how well my exercising is helping reduce the knee pain.

Able to participate in the race again to make it 10 out of 13 for me since its inception in 2000. (Since 2002 its been offered as a 15K in the spring and 5M in the fall.)

Things Done Wrong:
Took some poor advice regarding no longer using rigid orthotics that have helped me deal with plantar fascitis the past few years. Midway through the race my left arch began to sting a bit and I was limping in the evening following the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Over 9.3 miles of incredible dirt, and grass trails that wind you through a beautiful forest in Pilot Knob State Park. The terrain is the result of the glacial retreat and the moraines that were formed by deposited glacial debris. Twice you run up and around the “knob” which is the second highest area in Iowa with an elevation of 1450ft. (Where Iowans can go for alti"d"ude training for the PPA/PPM.) This course goes over stone bridges, through twists and turns, up and down inclines and declines of all angles. The course is set and marked by experienced runners and is as accurate as possible by using a measuring wheel.

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Colorado Mini Marathon — Fort Collins — May 6, 2007

Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 15 Miles
Goal: Under 1:30:00
Results: 1:34:29
Website: http://www.ftcollinsmarathon.com/

General Summary:
Great course along the Poudre River Canyon, then through to the center of Fort Collins. The marathon started higher up in the canyon and the mini marathon started a few miles from the end of the canyon. The race course was a good rolling course with nothing too difficult, either down or up.

Race went well in spite of my expectation prior to driving the course. I was able to maintain a good effort level the entire way and felt strong on any up hills. A good breeze was coming into our faces for a while which probably slowed us down but it was never unbearable. I was happy with my time.

Kara Roy ended up running an Olympic qualifying time with the third fastest time in Colorado’s history, as well as the fastest American time in Colorado.

Things Done Right:
I never exceeded my comfort level, even on the downhill portions which saved me for the last half of the race. I also got a good night’s sleep the night before and ate well prior to the race. Also, driving part of the course was beneficial so I wasn’t going to be too disappointed when I ran slower than I wanted.

Things Done Wrong:
I have to remember that elevation profiles aren’t very a very accurate way to gauge the speed of a course. My expectations were too high due to the rolling nature of the course.

Any Other Stuff:
I saw that Anton won the 50 mile at Collegiate Peaks which made me feel like I needed to start putting in some real miles. :)

Now that this race is over I really need to concentrate on going UP more! Pikes Peak is pretty much right around the corner.

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Crimestoppers Azalea Run 10K — Savannah, GA — May 12, 2007

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: get in some quality miles
Results: 46:12 10K - tha is quality for me
Website: http://www.savystrider.com/pages/results144.html

General Summary:
I was at a conference in Savannah, GA (Fraud and Forensic Accounting Education). After a couple of days of sitting in workshops all day I was chopping at the bit. I found a 10k that was being held less than 2 miles from the hotel, so I skipped first morning session on the last day of the conference to go do the 10k.

The early morning run from the hotel to the race was awesome; there was a shroud of fog, the air was heavy and still, just tremendous! By time the race started the fog was gone but humidity was still about 100%, and it sure felt hot.

The event was a small local race (Crimestoppers Azalea Run 10K), put on by the Savannah Running Club. Setting was beautiful; flat and, fast course through Savannah, tree lined streets, complete with Spanish moss.

I got a medal at the race (won age group :-)) that said “Crime Stoppers 10k.” The other conference participants were amused when I told the story - came to a fraud conference and got an award for being a crime stopper.

Things Done Right:
Skipped a conference panel discussion to do 10K (I was not on panel :-) but I did have to make a presentation later that morning.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not train in heat and humidity - slower by 45 seconds for second half - quads heavy and lactic, sweating like a pig (Note: I really do not know how pigs sweat since I am a city boy).

Any Other Stuff:
Savannah a beautiful city - great downtown: small parks every few blocks, very nice.

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Bishop High Sierra 50 mile ultramarathon — Bishop, CA — May 19, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: PR
Results: 11:05:49 ( a PR)
Website: http://www.bhs50.com

General Summary:
Awesome race held in the scenic Sierra Nevada mountains in Bishop CA. I had a little trouble finding the race start from Vegas though.....(WARNING! Non-running related material included)

Things Done Right:
You know how it is. It's happened to all of us. You're out driving in the Nevada desert, trying to find California, when finally you get over yourself and admit your lost, and decide to ask for directions from the friendly locals. Nevada has some funky sounding places in it, like Parump, and Creech, so it’s easy to get lost.I pulled up to this nice white building with a sign that said “ Cottontail Brothers” ( or so I thought).What a cute name for a convenience store! There were no cars parked out front, so I was able to pull right up to the front door. I wondered why so many truckers were howling at me, as I stood beside my car, map in hand, when I realized that the sign said Cottontail Brothel. Time to get my parump back in the car. Eventually I did find CA, after the friendly patrol officer pulled me over for going 95 mph, (he gave me directions and no ticket!) and had a successful race. Fortunately I had been heat training in my infrared sauna which I heat up to 135 degrees, because it got u p to 99 on the cours

e! I was able to eat plenty at the aid stations, so my energy levels stayed high.

Things Done Wrong:
Wore crummy old shoes.

Any Other Stuff:
Bishop High Sierra has to have some of the best aid stations of any race I’ve ran. There was hummus and guacamole, and chocolate dipped strawberries at some of the aid stations. Great pre-race drawings too!

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Colorado Colfax 1/2 Marathon — Denver — May 20, 2007

Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 1:34
Results: 1:35:37 placed 42/1695
Website: http://www.coloradocolfaxmarathon.com/

General Summary:
The 1/2 marathon started at City Park in Denver. The race was west on Colfax Ave. At one point the race diverted around a park with a lake. The only other detour off of Colfax was right at the end, with the finish line in the Colorado Mills shopping center. The weather was perfect. No wind, cool start at 6am.

Things Done Right:
I paced myself throughout the race and stayed hydrated. I was able to pass other runners the second half of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t realize the overall vertical gain was about 450 feet. I lost some time climbing.

Any Other Stuff:
It took me about 1/2 hour to walk and slowly jog back to my hotel, about 2 miles away. Perhaps this was good for a cool down.

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Medicine Bow 1/2 Marathon — Lincoln Memorial, Laramie Summit, I-80, Wy — May 27 2007

John Mills reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: 2 hr
Results: 2:15
Website: http://www.angelfire.com/wy2/marathon/

General Summary:
Great race! Simultaneous start for 1/2, marathon, and the double marathon. Course for the 1/2 was all dirt road, 4 mi+ downhill, 2+ uphill, then reverse to the finish. Climb to the finish is steep. Water and Gatorade furnished but no cups furnished. Any littering disqualifies the participant. A runner’s dream 5 K also — downhill course and a ride back to the start line!

Things Done Right:
Trained on hills.

Things Done Wrong:
Motel too close to the train tracks in Cheyenne the night before.

Any Other Stuff:
Beautiful course and scenery. Finishers received a medal and a screaming yellow t-shirt. Pretty low key race. No trophies or age-group awards.

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Madison Marathon — Madison, WI — May 27, 2007

Theresa Pitman reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:40 (Qualify for Boston)
Results: 4:10

General Summary:
Beautiful day for Memorial Day weekend in the Midwest. The course is great, I went to school and Madison and it is where I trained for my first marathon so it was nostalgic. The fans are great as usual in Wisconsin.

Things Done Right:
I thought I had done everything right but apparently on race day it wasn’t my day. Almost all of my long runs were with the Incline Club 3-4 hours in length, but most of my other runs and speedwork were done on a treadmill due to my work schedule.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train on road. Halfway through the race my quads and inner thighs felt like they were on the verge of cramping and the only way I would make it to the end was slowing down. My goal and all of my training was geared towards running a 3:40 and getting to Boston. Two weeks before I did the LRR to Barr Camp route (my last long run before my taper) and twisted my ankle coming down. So I ran very little the two weeks before the race, I just couldn’t find my race legs. I think I’m better at altitude and going uphill I guess. Next time I’m doing more road training so my muscles are ready for the pounding.

Any Other Stuff:
Again, great course, rolling hills but mostly flat, lots of lakes and great people!

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Rocky Mountain Double marathon — Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming — May 27, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 52.4 miles
Goal: win women's race
Results: won woman's race, third overall 9:16:06

General Summary:
I wasn’t sure how well I’d do, given I’d done a 50 miler the previous weekend. But I went in relaxed, using this as another training run. The weather was perfect.

Things Done Right:
Took lots of ultra-crack through-out the race. Hydrated well early on, ran the hills, and decided to chick as many guys as possible. What’s the worse that could happen? I could throw up, bonk, feel like crap for a while, suck it up and finish. I didn’t pass the guy who was in third place until I had four miles to go. He and I duked it out the last 13 miles, but I knew I’d get him on the four mile climb to the finish.

Things Done Wrong:
Got a little dehydrated, and didn’t eat well after the race. This really affected my recovery, and I still had the Squaw Peak 50 in six days to run.

Any Other Stuff:
This course can be used for a lot of different training purposes. There are long boring road sections, there’s sand, relentless climbs, and the mental challenge of having to do the same stretch four times. Great volunteers and a very nice finishers buckle for the double marathon runners, and a nice medal for the marathoners. However, if you need a race that has huge crowds cheering you on, a heroes welcome when you cross the finish line, clowns and balloons and bands along the way, then this isn’t the race for you. Lots of great views, and neat rock formations, which the Native Americans claim are inhabited by human and animal spirits.

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Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run — Orem UT — June 2, 2007

Anita Fromm reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 13:17:26 a PR
Website: http://www.squawpeak50.com

General Summary:
One tough race. This was my seventh SP finish, and it never gets any easier. But what else would I do on the weekends?

Things Done Right:
Hydrated days before the race and heat trained in my sauna.( yes, I hold down a job) It was calling for hot weather, and the toughest part of the race comes for me during the hottest part of the day. Took in enough calories early on in the race, because I knew I wasn’t going to feel like eating the last two hours.

Things Done Wrong:
Took a 20 minute nap at the 33 mile aid station. My legs felt tired . The volunteers were great, and waited on us hand and foot. They made it hard to want to leave. I also took another 15 minute nap on a downed tree. After straddling what seemed to be the thousandth tree due to all the avalanche activity in the previous winters, I got half way over one, and just stayed there, arms and legs dangling over each side until some other runners showed up and I had to move my parump.

Any Other Stuff:
Great, tough course, well organized, and well marked, but the hardest part is the one mile climb/bush-wacking ordeal that comes after running 38 miles. Good swag too.

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Kettle Moraine 100 Mile Endurance Run — Kettle Moraine State Park, Wisconsin — June 2-3, 2007

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: Finish under 24 hours
Results: 21:24:47 — 9th overall — 1st Senior Master
Website: http://www.kettle100.com/

General Summary:
KM100 is run in the southern Kettle Moraine State Park about 30 miles east of Madison, Wisconsin.

12,005 feet of vertical climb and loss; altitude all below 1200 feet; warm and humid.

Well organized, yet low-keyed races, with the 100 mile run they also offer a 100K, a 38-mile Fun Run and a 100-mile 4 person relay, so you’re never out there alone.

The course is two out and backs on the Ice Age Trail. The 1st out and back is run north for 31 miles and then returning to the start/finish line to end the 100K and then a 38+ mile out and back on the southern section. Plenty of aid is available, 9 well stocked stations and a few unmanned stations with water and bug repellant (mosquitoes and ticks can be a problem).

Things Done Right:
Tapered for the race, ate properly and slept well the days before the race.
With the heat and humidity I hydrated constantly before and during the run

Things Done Wrong:
I should have walked the early hills as there is a 10 mile stretch between 15 and 25 and again at 37 to 47 that is all run able. By mile 46 I hadn’t eaten any GUs for awhile and felt a bonk was coming on, so I spent a little time in the aid station eating and drinking more. The same thing occurred at the turnaround at 62. The key thing is I strapped by hydration pack back on and got out of the aid stations!

With the heat and humidity my feet swelled and my toes took a beating, which usually doesn’t happen in the cooler, drier climates, I should have considered thinner socks.

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Casper Marathon — Casper Wyoming — June 3, 2007

Craig Hafer reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:19 to 3:24
Results: 3:22:47 13/144 overall, 3/34 age group
Website: http://www.runwyoming.com/

General Summary:
The race start was at the Casper Events Center. This was a wonderful start with plenty of warm indoor space and lots of bathrooms. The weather was perfect with no wind and a cool start at 6:30am. The race started with a loop on the bluff overlooking Casper. At mile 5 and 6 the course dropped down to the North Platte river and an asphalt trail along the NP. The course followed the NP 9 miles to Paradise Park where it looped back on the same trail. At mile 20 the course left the NP to loop around a golf course with an additional 2.5 miles. The course finished down river at the host hotel (Holiday Inn).

Things Done Right:
Although the first mile was way too fast (6:46) downhill, I slowed down to a sustainable pace. I felt tired about mile 12 and started drinking the Powerade. I had a second wind about mile 16 and was able to pick up the pace for an even split overall.

Things Done Wrong:
I think I could have hydrated more during the first half of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
This was the friendliest race I’ve been in. The finish line was right in the host hotel parking lot. The race group served fruit, berries, pizza, sandwiches, juice, and sports drinks including beer. I felt like I knew most of the runners by the end of the race. It was a fun little party at the end.

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San Diego Rock & Roll Marathon — San Diego CA — June 03, 2007

John Cassidy reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: Beat old PR (5:09 ADTM 2003)
Results: PR’d 4:49:36
Website: http://www.rnrmarathon.com/home.html

General Summary:
Roll & Roll’ed with 25K other runner’s. Sea level running is easier. There were lots of spectators along the course. The last mile they had grandstands 20 rows deep. Finish was at the Marine Recruit Depot next to the airport. Run though Balboa park, downtown, on a freeway, around Mission Bay, Sea World. Over 50+ Elvis’s ran the race. Cheerleader squads every mile helps you keep going.

Things Done Right:
Signed up the last minute when I had an unexpected trip to SO CAL. Had fun. Did not PR the 1st 1/2. Drank allot.

Things Done Wrong:
Walked some the 2nd 1/2 when I didn’t need to. PR was in the bag so I dogg’ed it. Did not eat very much to prevent bathroom issue’s (long line’s at the port-a-john’s). So I did run low on energy.

Any Other Stuff:
I missed the downhill 13M from Pikes Peak. I like running downhill.

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Cytomax 10K Trail Run Championship — Vail, CO — June 3, 2007

Jamie McMillin reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Beat last year’s time of 1:44:35
Results: 1:32:38

General Summary:
This mountain trail run is characterized by its lack of switchbacks. The runner (?) is asked to run up the mountainside or down the mountainside and then up the mountainside and then down the mountainside and then… The surface? Grass / scree / mud / hard-packed dirt depending on the corridor, i.e. service road, single track through the woods, or straight uphill /downhill on slopes that you paid $90 to ski down last Winter.

Things Done Right:
Since 11/26/2006 I’ve completed seven Waldo Canyon loops, Six Longs Ranch Road excursions, seven Rampart Range Road up and downs, three Section 16 up and backs and two trips to Barr Camp. And, that’s just on Sunday.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing. I left it all on the trail (s)

Any Other Stuff:
As time fills the void between last Sunday and the present, my mind is becoming more and more inclined to call this experience fun. For all the hard-core, sadists of the IC, I totally recommend it.

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Deadwood Mickelson Trail Marathon — Deadwood, S.D. — 06/03/2007

Martina Ritchie reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish
Results: did, hooray!!
Website: http://www,deadwoodmickelsontrailmarathon.org

General Summary:
Runners are bused to start of trail. Then it’s 13.1 miles up a 3% grade on mostly a graveled trail and 13.1 miles down the other side into Deadwood; small amount of mud towards mile 20. Beautiful scenery, especially towards the end.

Things Done Right:
--ate a bagel & drank an electrolyte drink before starting. Am glad I’ve been running hills as a lot of runners were complaining about the 3% grade. I thought if felt flat (thank goodness for the club). Kept a constant pace going up; tried to eat at all aid stations (bananas, pretzels, M&M’s).

Things Done Wrong:
-was running with someone from Alabama going up as his pace was perfect. When we started down though, I didn’t realize he was going too slow and my knee began aching at mile 15. Tried walking-that hurt more-ending up sort of shuffling into an aid station where someone gave me two Advil-which allowed me to start running.

Comments on Calculator:
-didn’t use

Any Other Stuff:
--the aid stations had PowerAid, which I generally use for cool downs. Too sweet; hurt my stomach.. Should have taken my own electrolyte drink. Also no Gu at any of the stations. Cut off is 7 hours which is more than generous. Spaghetti dinner had nothing to drink but water (so bring your own if you go)

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Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: Faster than last year — 1:06:26
Results: 1:04:56
Website: http://www.gardentenmile.com/

General Summary:
Beautiful weather this year. Had an adequate warm up after driving down from Denver. Felt stronger with each passing mile and was able to pass quite a few people from 5 miles on to improve my time from last year by 1:30.

I really enjoyed the course and where it started and finished. I really hope it can remain there in the future.

Things Done Right:
Started conservatively and slowly moved up more and more throughout the race, with the latter half being run much harder.

Things Done Wrong:
Not getting in line for the porta potties earlier. Had to leave to make the start of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Most people reading this know this course very well... :)

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Garden of the Gods 10M — Colorado Springs — June 10, 2007

William Keller reports:
Distance: 10M
Goal: 1:30
Results: 1:28:14
Website: http://www.gardentenmile.com

General Summary:
Ran steady effort through the whole course, kept my HR right around 90% no matter if it was uphill or downhill. Ran faster than any training run pace I had done for a road race at this distance, so that felt good.

Things Done Right:
Trained on the road in the garden for 10 days in the last 10 weeks to get used to the course and the pace I could sustain. Wore a GPS/HR and was able to watch my HR, distance and avg pace the whole race...kewl. Definitely helped me keep on task to beat my goal time.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have done more speed work to get a bit more turnover in my legs. I still need to work on running hills better (doesn’t everyone or am I the only one?? lol).

Any Other Stuff:
For my ability, this was a challenging course. Can’t wait to take 10-15 minutes off this time for next year, lol.

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Michael Everson reports:
Distance: 10 Mile
Goal: Run with Gary
Results: Ran with Gary

General Summary:
Nice day. Warm. Good Support from schools.

Things Done Right:
Ran with my friend Gary the entire run. Basically used this as a training run. I ran the entire course--no walking!

Things Done Wrong:
Ran Incline Club Run the day before the race (not quite, but did 12 1/2 miles on Barr on 6/9/07).

Any Other Stuff:
I like the new layout for the course. Also, I never had a popsicle on a run until today. The “Martians” served me one at mile 9 and I loved it!

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Mireille Cameron reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Under 2 hours
Results: 1:42:05
Website: http://www.gardentenmile.com/

General Summary:
Nice course! Good aid station support and quick results.

Things Done Right:
Not starting out too fast and maintaining a steady pace.

Things Done Wrong:
I think I watched the pavement a lot more than the scenery. I needed to look around and enjoy the experience more.

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David Hatfield reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:40:00
Results: 1:41:19

General Summary:
Pretty hot that day and recovering from a hamstring tweak. Felt ok with it.

Things Done Right:
Showed up.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t drink enough water and forgot the salt tabs.

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:30
Results: 1:40
Website: http://Pikes peak Marathon.org

General Summary:
Nice day for a change.

Things Done Right:
n/a

Things Done Wrong:
Not too much went right.

Any Other Stuff:
n/a

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Rick reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:10:00
Results: 1:12:40

General Summary:
Perfect day for a race through the Garden of the Gods. I’ve lived here since Oct. 2006 and have not visited the Garden till the race. Was a few minutes off my goal, but still pleased with the effort. The course was a little harder than I expected. I kept a strong effort the last 2 miles and that was very important to me.

Things Done Right:
I hit the 5 mile marker at the time I wanted to and ran the 1st half of the race at the pace I expected.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not know the course very well, and I almost never run on pavement. I may have been a little too conservative on miles 1-5, was pushing really hard on miles 6-10 to try and make up some time.

Any Other Stuff:
Was glad that the course was harder than I expected. I like the challenge and I liked the effort I had to put in at the end to try and make up some time.

Also, I’m a father of a 1 yr. old girl and an, almost, 3 yr old boy, my wife and I cannot say enough about having the start/finish at the Park where the kids can play and the parents can relax. Thank-you!

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Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 10 mile
Goal: break two hrs
Results: not quite but close enough

General Summary:
Things went well and had a great time running with Brenda

Things Done Right:
Ran the course several times during the weeks leading up to the race

Things Done Wrong:
Could have run the downhills a little harder.

Any Other Stuff:
Race was very well organized and it is one of the most beautiful runs in Colorado. This was the first time I’ve volunteered and run the same race.

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Andrea Cichosz reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: under 1:50
Results: 1:45

General Summary:
I like the new course!!!!!

Things Done Right:
Trained in the Garden in the month before. Remembered, just because you leave the Garden of the God’s, you are not done with the race. I realized in training, that this could be a loooong last mile if not done right.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t use Glide in the morning. If it wasn’t for a generous soul from the Colorado Running Company, I would have remembered this race even more painfully.

Any Other Stuff:
I liked the gender separated start, even though a lot of “guys” didn’t seem to get it.

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Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: under two hours
Results: 2:08:57

General Summary:
Race went pretty well. Had help with pace from Joe. It helped to be familiar with the course.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well several days prior to the race. Practiced running the course also helped.

Things Done Wrong:
I probably could have pushed harder the second half of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
Volunteered before the race and I thought things were very well organized, people were friendly, and I really enjoyed this race.

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Diane L. Repasky reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:28:00
Results: 1:31:05
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Road race thru the Garden of the Gods.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated, carbed up, well rested with a slight taper.

Things Done Wrong:
Train more hills, drop a few pounds.

Any Other Stuff:
Good weather, a little warm. Felt good, could have maybe pushed a little harder but with a new course was unsure of what I would have left for the final hills. I like the new course.

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: Not to sleep in and meet Fred at 2.5 / 7.5 by 6:00
Results: Looking for a “V”

General Summary:
Great race, great new course, great day.

Things Done Right:
Volunteered, great thing to do especially when tapering before the slog-feast at Lake City on 16-June

Things Done Wrong:
Notta

Any Other Stuff:
Great volunteers!

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Michael Hartley reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 79.59
Results: 81.10

General Summary:
great race

Things Done Right:
hydration

Things Done Wrong:
finished with energy

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Bighorn 100 — Dayton, Wyoming — June 15, 2007

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: 24 hours
Results: 27:34
Website: http://www.bighorntrailrun.com

General Summary:
I failed in my attempts to enter this year’s Western States 100 and Hardrock 100 mile races-turned down flat because I had not yet completed a 100-mile race. Though three years ago I ran the 87-mile version of the Leadville 100, I was forced to drop out after my knees refused to carry me any further. Bottom line: I needed to run a hundred miles and the Bighorn 100 in the Bighorn National Forest near Sheridan Wyoming with no set criteria for entry met the bill. The race did eventually fill up, but that took a couple of months. I was in from the start.

Rebekka and I drove up from the Springs Thursday morning, the day before the race. After picking up my race packet in Sheridan we headed up Highway 14 to scout out the first crew access point (Dry Fork Headwaters Aide Station) and to find a camp site. We settled on a National Forest Campground a couple miles before Burgess Junction called Prune Creek. I had just about got the tent set up when a one-armed lady motored up in an ATV and unceremoniously told me we would have to move. “They were going to have to cut down trees due to the recent heavy rains and it would be unsafe for us to stay there.” I thought, well okay, assuming they would be working over a period of a couple of days. Just when I had dragged the tent over to a new site the workmen came up in a truck to start cleaning up the trees. One of them came over and said they would be finished in fifteen minutes and we could move back to our original site, which we did.

The race advertises itself as “Wild and Scenic” which is an understatement. The scenery is spectacular. The rock formations on the canyon walls date back to the Permian extinction with all subsequent geological eras represented. Know-nothing creationist bible thumpers eat your hearts out. The spectrum of our geological heritage is on display in the layers along these gorgeous canyons.

The race began along the Tongue River Canyon, then turned sharply uphill. My training partner Harry Harcrow and I ran together. Starting off conservatively we let a dozen or so runners take off ahead of us. On the uphill portion above Tongue River we steadily overtook 6 or 7 of them. Harry remarked, “This is a heckuva lot easier than the Incline,” referring to our staple training ladder of the old Incline tracks that climb steeply for 1.06 miles above Manitou Springs. Once you have done the Incline everything else pales in comparison. I pulled in to Dry Fork, 13.4 miles, a few minutes ahead of Harry in 2 hours 28 minutes. Over the next stretch we mostly ran together all the way to Foot Bridge at 30 miles (5:30). I wasted too much time there changing shoes, losing and finding my watch, and general dilly dallying. The first woman pulled in to the aid station and left before I did. I finally left after 14 minutes, but Harry and Darcy Africa were long gone.

Along the three and a half miles to the next aide station, The Narrows, it was wet where the trail hugged the Little Bighorn River... I had little hope of catching Harry again, so I settled into a slower pace, but hopefully fast enough to reach the turn-around at 48 miles before it got too dark... After the Narrows the next aide station would be Spring Marsh. About halfway to Spring Marsh Jamie Gifford caught up and passed me. He later finished 5th overall. I kept him in sight and I think he was surprised when I caught up to him again at Spring Marsh. A lady at Spring Marsh told me I was in seventh place, but I had been keeping count and by my reckoning I would be in 11th at that point unless some people had dropped out. After the next aide station, Elk Camp, came the snow. There were about 8 or so patches of 25-50 yards of snow to plunge through over about a mile. The first and second place runners came by about this time separated by about 3 minutes. 30 minutes later and about five minutes before I reached

Devil’s Canyon Road (where Rebekka would meet me) Harry Harcrow was in solid third. At Devil’s Canyon Road (47 miles) I dropped off everything with Rebekka, including my flashlight! It was getting dark... fortunately it was light enough that I was able to run the mile out and mile back to the turnaround at Porcupine Ranger Station. Back with Rebekka at Devil’s Canyon Road again I put on jacket and gloves in anticipation of the long night ahead. It was a beautiful night--full starlit night, no moon--no wind, no rain. But it was a long night. I reached the Narrows just before 3 A.M. and Footbridge about 20 minutes to five. I forgot my flashlight at Footbridge and had to backtrack 100 yards to retrieve it. It was still too dark! The next three and a half miles to Bear Creek is the infamous “Wall,” a steep uphill. Though it was hard, it was actually a resting time, because of the slower pace--I walked it.

After Bear Creek with the sun in the sky and 8 long miles to Cow Camp...lapsing into small hallucinations and in and out of consciousness I talked myself into allowing just stopping on the side of the trail for one second and closing my eyes for one second. I stopped, sat down, closed my eyes for one second--I am pretty sure it was only one second, got up and continued... I was not going fast... Where was everyone? Someone should surely have caught me by now. Only two runners had passed me from the turnaround until here... Then I saw three runners a couple hundred yards back...one would turn out to be a pacer, one was a woman, and the other was Paul Schoenlaub, who Harry had introduced me to very early in the race... They caught up and passed me before Cow Camp. When I reached Cow Camp they were all still there--I grabbed some food and left fast--they wouldn’t catch back up to me for a couple of miles... then the long slog in the hot sun to Dry Fork and the next meeting point with Rebekka. Turns out she had n

ot gone back to our camp site, but had driven straight to Dry Fork and slept in the car waiting for me. I think she expected me earlier, because she had run down to meet what she thought would be me 2 or 3 times already... My feet were a mess of blisters and hot spots... My ankle had started hurting the instant I had put on my second pair of shoes at Footbridge (mile 65) — it was now red and swollen... 17.5 miles to go... I knew I would finish, but it would be hell... The sun was hot... I forgot to put on sunscreen... Rebekka ran back to get some... I was going slow enough that it was no problem... Now the 30K runners came from behind--they would run the same course to the finish... On the trail they would come behind me and say “excuse me,” to which I would reply “which side,” , I politely taught quite a few of them proper runner’s etiquette — simply say “on your left,” and the runner can adjust and let you by. If you say “behind you” or “ ;excuse me” that is not enough information... I was not mo

ving very fast. Next up was “The Haul,” a steep climb prior to the four-mile downhill to the Tongue River. Paul had told me about it and that it would only be about 20 minutes--I timed myself in 15 minutes--uphill was a lot easier than downhill at this stage...Oh the downhill... was excruciating...The Lower Sheep Creek Aide station would be at the bottom-- I hallucinated turning a big rock into an aide station tent--later a 30K woman came behind me and told me the aide station was just ahead--I didn’t believe her even though she pointed out the tent--I thought it was another hallucination...

Rebekka met me again at the trailhead to pace me the final 5.3 miles to the finish line. 5.3 miles of flat gravel road. I had to walk. My left knee was shooting pain every time I tried to run. Where was the 1 mile to go sign? Was it around that bend? No. How much farther than that bend? Long ways. Rebekka kept me going at 15 minute walking miles. I wanted to get the deed done! She kept look out for any 100 milers coming up behind, though it didn’t do any good when one did pass me. Nothing I could do about it. Finally with about half a mile to go the gravel road turned paved and when I tried running the pain was gone and I was able to run in to the finish... in 27 hours 34 minutes. My first 100-mile race.

Upper Sheep Creek 1:42:35 1:42:35

Dry Fork Headwaters 46:00 2:28:35

Out 2:32 2:31:08

Cow Camp 58:14 3:29:22

Bear Creek 1:25:57 4:55

Footbridge 25:00 5:30

Out 13:52 5:43:52

The Narrows 47:09 6:31:01

Spring Marsh 1:41:33 8:12

Elk Camp 59:35 9:12:10

Devil’s Canyon Road 1:29:04

Spring Marsh 2:48:47 13:30:02

The Narrows 2:11:41 15:41:43

Footbridge 1:09:35 16:51:19

Cow Camp 3:46:18 20:37:37

Dry Fork Headwaters 1:59:40 22:37:18

Upper Sheep Creek 1:35:08 24:12:27

Lower Sheep Creek 1:18:26 25:30:53

Out 2:54 25:33:47

Trailhead 39:22 26:13:09

Finish 1:21:21 27:34:31

Things Done Right:
Ran easy

Things Done Wrong:
Bad shoes

Any Other Stuff:
Magnificent scenery. Very remote.

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Santa Cruz Mtns. Trail Run — Santa Cruz, CA — June 16, 2007

Lori Hawkins reports:
Distance: 10k,21k,29k,50k
Goal: 29k in 4 hours
Results: 4:14
Website: http://www.pctrailruns.com/Santa_Cruz_Mountains.htm

General Summary:
Pacific Coast Trail Runs puts on “Runs that Aren’t Races in Beautiful Places” and with a backdrop of the California coast, who’s to argue? Except us here in Colorado. Well organized race, great snacks and support, very friendly runners--reminded me of IC people! Ups and downs but nothing extreme, with 2 river crossings thrown in. Foggy day, overcast, perfect for running (not perfect for fans who went to the beach to kill time).

Things Done Right:
Ate well early, kept shoes on for river crossing, kept the nose to the grindstone, even when the grindstone was wearing me out. Kept a good attitude. Got my parents to drive me from Stockton so I could veg on the way home.

Things Done Wrong:
Biggest mileage week in months (taper, what’s that?), didn’t bring enough gels.

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Mt Evans Ascent — Idaho Springs, CO — June 16, 2007

Trish Hagan reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: 3:15
Results: 3:28

General Summary:
What a beautiful day! (The big horn sheep at the end thought so too!) Paved road course starting at Echo Lake (10K elevation) and ending near the summit (14K elevation.) The views are breathtaking.

Things Done Right:
Kept up with hydration and calories well during the race. Dressed appropriately (not overdressed for once!)

Things Done Wrong:
Attended a meeting in Chicago the week before, flying back the night before the race--not enough sleep after questionable nutrition and training for the week! Also, didn’t spend enough time running on pavement before the race or at altitude (because of the snow on the Peak.) Felt great until mile 12 then the higher altitude got me!

Any Other Stuff:
The PA system at the beginning didn’t work well so I never did hear the directions. Also, it was hard to get used to running on the left side of the road and avoiding the motorized vehicles.

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Darrell Weaver reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: 2:45
Results: 2:54
Website: http://www.racingunderground,com

General Summary:
14.5 miles on pavement from Echo Lake (10,000 ft)to the Mt Evans summit parking lot (14,000+). Except for a flat/slight downhill stretch of about 400-500 meters at Summit Lake (at 9 miles), it’s a steady uphill grind. Weather was perfect, maybe even a little warm. Not a lot of air up there.

Things Done Right:
Started slow. Tried to hold a steady pace, which got pretty hard to do toward the end.

Things Done Wrong:
I had no business running this thing. Insufficiently trained. The altitude toward the top really hammered me.

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Mireille Cameron reports:
Distance: 14.5
Goal: Beat the cutoff of 4.5 hours
Results: 3:26:52
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevans

General Summary:
What a great event! The weather was perfect, the sponsorship and aid stations were great (loved the Hammer products). I highly recommend this race.

Things Done Right:
Good nutrition for several weeks before the race, resting before hand, staying at the hot springs spa afterward, and not worrying about the weather.

Things Done Wrong:
Thinking I was recovered enough to continue training so hard the week afterward (ooops — forgot how hard it is to bounce back after pushing that hard at altitude the first few times each year).

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Fred Baxter reports:
Distance: 14.5 Miles
Goal: 2:30:00
Results: 2;24:52

General Summary:
Very Little Down Hill A Lot Of Up Hill
Very Nice Day
Nice White Vans To Bring You Down
If You Like Running The Pikes Peak Ascent Run This One

Things Done Right:
Ran A Lot Of Up Hills

Things Done Wrong:
Did Not Run Enough Up Hills

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Lloyd Takeshita reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles (14,264ft.)
Goal: Finish within cutoff
Results: Finished with minutes to spare

General Summary:
First race over 13,000ft. since leg injury last summer resulted in cancelling rest of years runs and off for almost 6 months. Goal was to see how far I’ve come.

Things Done Right:
Wish I could think of something

Things Done Wrong:
Developed leg cramps 9 miles into run..was a real bummer but was able to keep from totally going zonk. Considering I was hydrating and taking gel.

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Eddie Baxter reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: Win age group 50-54
Results: Won age group 2:17:32

General Summary:
Perfect day for running. First time running this race
won’t be the last.

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated before and during race. Didn’t go out to fast so I felt strong to mile 13 then slowed a bit.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have got more altitude training .

Any Other Stuff:
Great race. Not too crowded.

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Charles Scheibe reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: Under 3:00:00
Results: 3:05:55
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevans/index.html

General Summary:
Scenic course; paved roads; from 10,000’+ to 14,000’+.

Things Done Right:
Conservative pace, using checkpoints from previous race. Despite falling behind at the 4 mile mark, maintained plan and finished 6:25 ahead of PR!

Things Done Wrong:
Insufficient preparation overall; especially on hills and altitude above 10,000’.

Any Other Stuff:
Highly recommended! Great preparation for PP Ascent.

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Andy Kovats reports:
Distance: 14.5M
Goal: Sub 2:30, top 25 OA
Results: 2:24:12, 17th OA
Website: http://www.racingunderground.com/mtevans/index.html

General Summary:
The course is 14.5 miles on paved road starting at the toll gate and finishing a hundred feet or so below the 14,256’ summit. The grade is about half as steep as Barr Trail and there are a couple nice downhills to open up on. The extra snow this year made the scenery all the more spectacular. It is good to see this race revived and growing though it is capped at 300 entrants by the Forest Service. I recall in the 80’s when this race competed with the Pikes Peak Ascent in size and prestige, which only points out how lucky we are to have PPA/M in our back yard. Thanks to Danelle Ballengee and more recently Racing Underground for bringing back this race! After missing an age group award by 18 seconds in the Garden last week it was good to place, and the Incline Club was well represented by awards going to Darrell Weaver, Eck Zimmerman, and the ever-tough Baxter Brothers.

Things Done Right:
Slept at 9100’ the night before. Paced about right (i.e. very slow to first aid station) as the race starts at 10,600 feet and my heartrate was in an elevated panic just standing around at the start. Switched from a steady run to a hard run for about 1/4 mile followed by about 30 paces walking not long after hitting steep sections above Summit Lake. This tactic allowed me to move up at least 4-5 places the last 3 miles of the course. Hydrated more than usual before and during the race and dressed in a tank top due to warm conditions.

Things Done Wrong:
Still a bit tired from Garden 10M the previous Sunday and had no very-high altitude running time yet this year. The aid stations were spaced about right but I was denied a 2nd cup of water a couple times so starting with a water bottle might have been a good idea.

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Lake City 50 — San Juan Summer Solstice 50 — Lake City Colorado — June 16, 2007

Gordon reports:
Distance: 50 Miles
Goal: Finish and not end up in the hospital
Results: Finished and didn’t end up in the hospital
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/index.htm

General Summary:
Pre Race

This was to be my third consecutive Lake City 50. Up to now I had been extremely fortunate as far as weather and course conditions were concerned. This year looked like it was going to be different. Given the late spring conditions with recent snow fall and course reports forewarning of “larger than usual snow fields,” and course marshals assuring runners “the course will be wet, snowy, and slow.” Updates on the web page http://www.lakecity50.com/index.htm gave us the latest conditions. The weather on race day predicted excellent temperatures with highs in the 70s and lows in the 40s.

We arrived at the Towne Square Cabins around 4 PM and saw that the Veteto brothers and Mary-Clare had also arrived at Cabin 8. They had planned to camp, but were fortunate to acquire Judy Dewitt’s cabin as unfortunately she pulled due to a hip injury. We strolled over to the Amory to check in and take in the mandatory pre-race meeting. It was great to see familiar faces, one of the race directors welcomed me back. It was a good omen, from my race packet I pulled my bib number 9 — same number as last year! It was reassuring to hear that the snow pack had continued to melt during the week, so much in fact that course changes wouldn’t be necessary — although there were several “modifications” in the Divide section above treeline. Skipping the pre-race meal, Jonathan, Jared and I met up with Carole and Mary-Clare for an excellent pasta dinner, entertained by the restaurant owner with stories of Ferraris and Joe Pesci. After depositing our drop bags for the Carson aid station, it was back to the cabins and an earl

y night.

Woke before my 4:00 AM alarm, and got ready prior to heading back out over to the Amory for the final check in. Walked past Scott Jurek — who we heard might be running. A few minutes before 5:00 all the runners headed over to the starting line in the early morning darkness. With clear skies and stars, it looked like it was going to be a perfect day!

Race

Alpine Gulch didn’t disappoint, with the bone-chilling creek crossings that flowed much faster than I remembered. My feet were like blocks of ice, I didn’t regain feeling again until well up the trail to the top ridge. After crossing a snow field I bent down to remove rocks from my shoes, when I looked up startled by a “runner” coming back up the trail towards me. The runner turned out to be Scott Jurek who told me he was training to get altitude for the upcoming Hardrock 100.

One of my biggest concerns was altitude, as snow had prevented anyone getting much time above treeline. Jonathan and I had hiked up above the Craggs on Pikes Peak the weekend before, camping out at 11,500’... would it be enough?

I remembered the course description on the web page, “the snowfield ascent just above the Alpine Aid Station is difficult crossing with hard snow and a steep grade. Runners may consider carrying something to assist snow crossing and which can also be used to arrest a slide.” After traversing to the top of the ridge, we started our descent into Williams Creek. This is where the course changed from previous years. We came out of the trees at 15.7 miles and into the Williams Creek campground instead of the trailhead, a revision to alleviate traffic congestion on Cinnamon Pass Road. It was great coming into the aid station to cheers and the happy faces of Carole (best support crew ever), Mary-Clare and Jared. Back out and up the county road and onto the Wager Gulch jeep road, starting the long haul up to the Carson aid station at treeline. I caught up to Dana Kingston who looked strong, she had been training hard and was bound and determined to get to the finish line, we exchanged words of encouragement as we cli

mbed up and up. Coming into Carson aid I saw a familiar face, fellow Cruder and local “renown back-packer” John Teisher “J.T.” A bit of a mix-up getting drop bag 19 instead of 9, made for a few anxious minutes, but in the end my bag was located, and a much needed change of socks and shoes. J.T. and I headed out about the same time Dana was coming in.

Next “up,” the Divide along the Colorado Trail. We approached one of the course modifications, instead of going around the east side of Coney Peak, it was up and over it to avoid a huge snowfield... oh goody more climbing. As J.T. and I headed up, off to the south I was concerned to see some rather ominous dark clouds forming. It was in this section that I ran out of hydration last year, I was not going to make that mistake twice, and had the excellent support crew at Carson fill up my camelback with 90 ounces of a 50/50 combination of Cytomax and water. I had plenty of fluid, but now I was worried that I came away without something just as important — gear for inclement weather. I made the mistake of trusting the weather forecast, now as the clouds darkened and approached I would have given almost anything for the poncho and long-sleeved shirt that were in my running bag back in Cabin 4 (Crawl Inn). I gave myself shit, after all isn’t this springtime in the Rockies, and to be prepared for anything? As we mad

e our way along the Colorado Trail at 13,500’ it started... BOOM! Lightning strikes all around, to my left and then to the right, glare reflecting back in my sunglasses with an instantaneous explosion of thunder. I looked around at the streaks of lightening, wondering if it hurt to get hit? As runners we are warned to get off the ridge and down as quickly as we can, nothing like a little thunder and lightning kicking you in the ass to pick up the pace. A runner who was using hiking poles threw them off the trail away from him. In turned out the metal poles were humming and starting to vibrate! The wind increased, then the sleet started, stinging my face. What next? Wait for it ...hail. Post-holing along through another snow field made for slow going. It wasn’t too bad as the snow was crusty and we walked across, but then the surface would give way and you’d end up to your waist in snow, feet in ice water. Just before we descended on the roped snow slide, J.T. exclaimed that he had made up his m ind for th

e same weekend next year... the Sailin’ Shoes 5 km! “I would have been finished hours ago and be drunk by now!” With the lightening streaking all around, I took off, not to see J.T. again until the finish line.

After which had to be the longest 10 miles, I started to descend off the Colorado Trail ecstatic to see trees and the yurt complete with snow cat in the Divide aid station at mile 31. Heading out of the aid station I sank up to my ankles in a shoe-sucking boggy muck. The muddy sections continued. I was surprised, as I started down Slumgullion Pass road, that my shoes were picking up heavy sticky mud, making each Montrail Mesai feel like 10 pounds of dead weight. Running down through the rocks, I passed Tim Edwards who looked beat up. “Nothing left in my legs” he said, hang in there man you’re at mile 40! I always like coming into Slum, not only because it’s crew accessible, but it’s only 10 miles to the finish. Carole was ready for me, quick change, downing Mountain Dew (nectar of the gods), across the highway, and down the trail climbing over trees that had fallen a week or two earlier during a horrendous wind storm. Throughout the course there was a huge number of downed trees, and this would continue all t

he way to Vickers. After heading down, it’s up 1,700 to 11,000, before reaching the final aid station on a high mountain pasture covered in wild flowers. I picked a purple day lily and tucked it into my old school Lake City 50 visor. I approached the aid station, when asked what I needed, I replied “beer.” The wonderful lady — who I found out was volunteering at the race for the first time — bent down and produced a beer. I laughed and said I had a ‘few” cold ones waiting for me 5 miles down the trail, and better not.

Down onto single track and the Waterdog Trail, a few little uphills here but for the most part it’s all downhill seeing Lake City through the trees. More rocks, more mud and fallen trees, until the skree sections with about 2 miles left to go. I felt much stronger here than in previous years, passing 5 or 6 runners. Entering town, you pick up the buzz from the park and the finish line. The earlier storms had moved out, leaving clear skies again, and a gorgeous Colorado evening! Turning onto Silver Street, I saw a familiar figure jumping up and down, arms waving, it was Carole urging me to the finish. Clapping, cheers, tears, hugs and high fives, crossing the finish line with quick circle around the tree. I finished 15:00, 20+ minutes off my previous times, but given the conditions I was more than happy. I presented Carole with the wild flower I had picked for all she had done.

Post Race

JT collapsed with a beer in hand across the finish line, Dana showing incredible guts and determination crossed the finish line after the cutoff, but ran an incredible race. Once again, the whole CRUD team was there cheering until the last runners came in.

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated and fueled.
S-Caps timed to take one every hour on the hour.
Met Scott Jurek.
Opened my heart.

Things Done Wrong:
Made a rookie mistake by not preparing for stuff above tree line.

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Timothy Edwards reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: 15:57:57
Results: 15:37:31

General Summary:
What a great course for my 1st 50 mile ultra. I loved the scenery and the very high altitude challenges.

I had a blast until my legs cried out about 2/3 of the way. But with aid station help at mile 40 and a mental boost I was able to run the last ten miles with gusto to cross the finish line 22 minutes before the cutoff.

Things Done Right:
Kept eating and drinking. Brought a rain jacket along, which saved my tail along the Continental Divide.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t push hard enough during the rain-snow-lightning storm.

Any Other Stuff:
The many creek crossings of ice cold, rushing water was rather fun!, but and the countless snowfields got a little old after hours on end. Dry shoes helped mentally but soon thereafter — more water and deep mud to forge through. Spectacular scenery with 5 fourteener mountains and many thirteeners in immediate view.

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Tom Kelecy reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Finish with my wonderful wife, Laura
Results: 14:18:23 / Finished with Laura, still my wife (and still wonderful) after 50 miles
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/

General Summary:
Course: Fifty miles of jeep road and single track, numerous stream crossings early on, 3 significant climbs, two up to and over 13,000’ and the last one a 1,600’ or so climb in the last 10 miles of the race. Significant snow field crossings above tree line, and significant mud field crossings thanks to snow melt and thunderstorms that moved in that afternoon.

Weather: Sunny early in the day, then the thunderstorms moved in mid to late afternoon. They cleared out for a nice sunny finish at the end.

Aid: 6 aid stations, all pretty decently stocked with the usual fare, and great volunteers. Three of the 6 stations were designated for drop bags, and the volunteers had them ready for us as we entered each aid station.
Race: The primary goal was to run with Laura and finish in pretty decent shape. We had looked at a sub 14 hour finish, and had the splits worked out for all the aid stations and the top of the 3 significant climbs, but never referred to those during the race. When I checked our splits after finished, we were right on track up to the last downhill segment. Lot’s of rocky, steep descents (not Laura’s forte). The stream crossings were a hoot, thought there were a couple where the current was a little brisk. The snow field crossings ended up not being as bad as we had originally anticipated, thanks to the warmer weather the week before. The highlight probably came right after the second climb when we got to slide down a steep snowfield decent on a rope. The rope, however, only extended to about half the distance of the decent, and so we had to slide down the remainder of the decent in whatever way was the most convenient (my butt). The lowlight came shortly after when thunderstorms moved in while we wer e

still traversing the continental divide portion of the trail. We were fortunate in our timing, in that we could see several of these storms developing around us, some on the course ahead, and some on the course that we had just passed behind us, but never had one right overhead. The final couple of miles back into town were steep and tedious descents on rocky trail surfaces. Once in to town though, we mustered enough energy to run the remaining half mile or so in to the finish, where Laura and I crossed the finish line holding hands. OK, so maybe there was one more highlight (WARNING: the following may result in sudden illness, nausea and vomiting): Laura and I crossed the finish line holding hands (What were we supposed to do? Cross the finish line holding our feet?) Everyone at the finish line made a big deal about it being our wedding anniversary. We had worn orange ribbons on our wrists to commemorate the now legendary wedding proposal I made after crossing the finish line at Leadville nearly seven years ago. No one proposed to anyone after we crossed the finish line at Lake City, not that we weren’t delirious.

Things Done Right:
Pre-race: Trained as well as possible, considering the local trail conditions. We started in January, and got some longer runs under our belt, in spite of the persistent snow. Ran a couple of shorter trail races (26.2 mi, 50K and 25 mi) as tune ups, and helped to learn better pacing control. Got in some altitude training (close to 13,000’) within the last few weeks before the race. Did a pretty good job of tapering. Learned to eat and drink on the go, including learning what works and what doesn’t. Prepared for just about anything with our drop bags.
Race: Did a good job pacing ourselves early on, and stayed pretty consistent throughout the race. Drank regularly from my CamelBak and took electrolyte tablets every hour or two.

Things Done Wrong:
Almost made a crucial mistake, like several others I talked to, I believed the weather forecast that it would be sunny and dry all day. I had rain gear at the Carson aid station just in case, but did not take it with me on the second climb above 13K and traverse of the Continental Divide. When the storms moved in, all I had was my Tyvek jacket. Had we really gotten dumped on with precipitation, I might have been in trouble. Got lucky this time.

Any Other Stuff:
A lot of good raffle prizes after the awards ceremony the next day. Nice touch, also providing breakfast. Again, can’t say enough about the great organization of the race and great volunteers. Post race recovery is going well, thanks to our training and conservative race strategy.

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Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 50 Miles
Goal: Run & finish w/Tom & stay happily married
Results: Check
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com

General Summary:
They threw a bit of everything at us during this run — rushing river crossings, snow traverses, steep snow descent on a rope, then sliding the rest of the way down when the rope ran out, thunderstorm, sunshine, two climbs to 13,000’, one climb to 11,000’ (after going 40 miles already), gorgeous scenery.

Things Done Right:
Got in some long runs and entered a few races to learn pacing and fueling(Run Thru Time Marathon, Greenland 50K, Collegiate Peaks 25 miler). Improved and learned something with each one. Spent the weekend before Lake City up at Barr Camp to acclimatize a little. I was very happy with all my gear — hat, hydration pack (Intensity by Nathan, sized for women w/ front pockets — I highly recommend it and I saw many out on the course), shoes & socks. Was prepared for a long day in the mountains. This course allowed us to use our climbing strength. Ate, drank and paced myself well, with Tom’s support (watermelon is my new favorite aid station food). Had no lingering aches or pains afterwards.

Things Done Wrong:
I can’t run downhill, especially on anything loose, and there was a lot of that on this course. I can’t believe I didn’t win the “Ugly Feet” contest.

Any Other Stuff:
Race committee and volunteers were exceptional. Good dinner on Friday and excellent breakfast on Sunday. Lots of door prizes.

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Bighorn 50K — Dayton, Wyoming — June 16, 2007.

Linda Aiman reports:
Distance: 30K
Goal: To finish before the deadline.
Results: Finished in 5 hrs. 59 min. (11 hours were allowed.)

General Summary:
This is the first time I have ever gone this far in a race. It was billed as “Wild and Scenic,” and it certainly was. The outstanding venue added to the enjoyment of the race. I did the race with my brother, Gary, and we did our best to walk quickly and jog wherever we could. I enjoyed it very much and would happily participate again next year.

Things Done Right:
Dave, John, and I drove up on Thursday so as to have time to look around and rest up before the race on
Saturday. As for the race dogged persistence got me (and my brother) through the race much faster than we had anticipated; we were pleased.

Things Done Wrong:
We carried too much water and a few other things because we didn’t know how excellent the aid stations were going to be. I haven’t done many races, but these were the best I’ve ever seen, and the people were superb.

Any Other Stuff:
I would recommend this race to anyone. It includes a 30K, a 50K, a 50-miler, and a 100-miler--something for every skill level.

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Bighorn 50 miler — Dayton, Wyoming — June 16, 2007

John Cassidy reports:
Distance: 52 Miles
Goal: Finish
Results: 34 Miles in 10:10 (cutoff was 10:00)
Website: http://www.bighorntrailrun.com/

General Summary:
8 hour drive to Dayton WY. It’s 9 miles south of Montana. Course ranges from 9100 to 4200 feet. Meadows, snow, trees, 1,000,000,000 flowers, moose, elk, deer, snakes, rabbits, bugs, streams, creeks, rivers, marshes, trails, roads, horses, aid stations. All can be seen within 3 feet of the trail. I have no clue what's beyond the 3 feet left and right of the trail because the 3,145,584,997 rocks that are on the trail required very close attention. Lots of stumbles, only one trip.

Four races in one weekend, 100M, 50M, 50K, 30K all finish in Dayton at 9:00 PM (they stagger the starts by location and time) Only the 100M is an out-and-back.

Things Done Right:
When registering — get the bus ticket. It’s a pain to go get your car 80 road miles away (that is if you have a second car to get to the first). If you are a 50K or 30K racer it’s 50 road miles to the start.

Things Done Wrong:
LCD. Lowest common denominator. Ran with a friend, slowed when he suffered. Likewise, he slowed when I suffered. Its 50 miles at some point everyone suffers and slows. We both gave at least 10 minutes waiting on the other. We both got 2nd winds (but at different times) Guess what, we were 10 minutes late at the second cutoff.

GPS locked-up at 3:17 into the race. I had no idea of time remaining to next cutoff.

Any Other Stuff:
Very wet, rocky, muddy course. They call in wild & scenic and it is. From the knees down you will be covered in mud. Drop bag should have sock and shoe change available.

You must check in on Friday and watch a movie about the rules. Miss the movie guarantees you will miss the start, race, finishing, everything.

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David Hendrix reports:
Distance: 50 miles.
Goal: To finish.
Results: Did not finish.

General Summary:
The race started at 6am with an 18 mile down hill run through snow, mud and water. The next 16 miles starts with an 3 mile up hill and fairly flat for the next 13 miles to the 2nd cut off. This is where I was forced to quit because I missed a cut-off time. After that there was a 18 mile run down hill to the finish.

Things Done Right:
I drank a lot of water and ate frequently at the aid stations. I also had ecaps and ibuprofen.

Things Done Wrong:
The main thing done wrong was I ran with a friend. When he was fast I was slow and when he was slow I was fast. This was not a bad thing but what was is that we waited on each other and we missed the cut off.

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Bighorn Mountain Wild and Scenic Trail Run — Dayton, WY — June 15, 2007

Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: 22 hours
Results: 22:43:22
Website: http://www.bighorntrailrun.com/

General Summary:
Beautiful out and back course in the Bighorn Mountains in Northern Wyoming. The course is primarily single track trail with some portions on 4 wheel drive roads and the final 4 miles on a dirt road through town. The race starts at 11:00 am, which means that everyone runs throughout the night.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy during the first 13 miles to the first major aid station. After that it was another 17 miles to the next major aid station. I was still feeling fresh at that point and was able to push the next 17 miles of almost entire uphill, passing a few other runners. My goal had been to get to the turnaround before darkness, which I did.

Things Done Wrong:
Doubted myself at times.

Any Other Stuff:
The race started with cloud cover and humidity, but it was cooler than I had expected. After a few miles on a dirt road through a canyon, the course goes steeply uphill until a rolling portion which ends at mile 13. The next 10 is on a 4 wheel drive road and finally 7 more on a very muddy, rutted trail which really sucked. After mile 30, the course was much more runnable even though it was all uphill. Near the turnaround there were some huge snow fields and lots of marhsy, muddy terrain. I changed my shoes at the turnaround even though my feet would be soaked within another two miles. I had to change them since my right shoe had basically ripped apart across the toe box. I had looked forward to a runnable portion once we were back in the forest, but at night it seemed very rocky. After the aid station at mile 65, the next 4 miles were a very steep uphill, but I hiked that portion strong. During the next 6 miles I was very tired and could not run. I was done. I planned my DNF, but the only problem was t

hat the next aid station was not where my wife would be, so I was not sure what to do about that. With about a mile to go to the aid station the sun rose and I felt strong (considering). So I ran. I ran into and out of that aid staion and most of the way to the next aid station. After that it was only another 17 miles and I had nothing else planned, so I continued on. At one point there is a very steep downhill leading into a canyon. This part sucks and I had a hard time getting down. Near the end of the hill I thought I saw someone closing in on me, so I ran hard. I ran hard for the next 8 miles to the finish line. I never saw that person or know if that person ever existed. Probably the best racing experience that I have ever had. Things were looking bad for me and I continued on especially when I did not want to. I know there are many runners would say that I was having a great race and should stop whining. They are right! I have to say that disappointing my wife and son played a great deal in

to me continuing on. The fact that I was able to finish strong made it even better.

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Estes Park Marathon — Estes Park, CO — June 17, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub 4 hours
Results: 4:14:03

General Summary:
I ran this race the day after running the Mt. Evan’s Ascent in 3 and a half hours. High elevations warm temperatures made it a nice training run.

Things Done Right:
What is it with people wearing gobs of ungodly smelling perfume and body spray during a race??!! If I am ever a RD again, I swear I will disqualify anyone who wears perfume. Anyway, I worked so hard to pass and stay ahead of this one smelly chick, that I came in 7th overall woman in this moderately difficult course.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t break four hours like I wanted to. This race was harder than i thought.

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Slacker Half Marathon — Loveland Ski area to Georgetown — June 23, 2007

Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 13.1 Miles
Goal: Around 1:20:00
Results: 1:20:15, 2nd overall
Website: http://slackerhalfmarathon.com

General Summary:
Not completely a trail race, but not completely a road race so I’m not sure if this counts for an ‘R’ so I’ll submit it just in case it is.

This was one of those races where I felt good pretty much the entire time. These kinds of races don’t come every day so I better enjoy them when they present themselves.

Things Done Right:
Like in the Garden of the Gods race I started out conservatively and was able to make my way further up in the pack until I reached second place. Had there been another half mile I would have caught the guy in first and passed him. He had a good 4-5 minutes on me by mile 7 but continued to fade.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much during the race but I really should have had a hat and long sleeve shirt afterwards because I got some good sunburn standing in the sun for hours after the race during the expo. All that standing and I didn’t even win a solar powered garden gnome. Oh well, I don’t even have a yard since I live in a condo so I think I can live without one. :)

Any Other Stuff:
Starts at the Loveland Ski area at 10,650’, and follows a rocky, dirt non-motorized road for 5 miles until it reaches Bakerville where it jumps out onto a service road. From there it travels down to Silverplume and onto a bike path, and from there makes its way to the dirt roads of Georgetown, meandering the rolling hills to the finish.

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Double Dipsea — Stinson Beach California — June 23

Karen reports:
Distance: 13.7
Goal: sub 2:40 (age graded 2:24)
Results: 2:28 (age graded 2:04)
Website: http://www.doubledipsea.com/

General Summary:
13.7 mile handicap race starting at sea level and climbing 1400 ft in the first 2.5 miles with a slow descent back to 100ft over the next few miles only to climb another 800 ft in a mile and dropping back to sea level again using a bajillion wooden steps. Then it’s time to turn around and go back to the start.

I love this race for its camaraderie and sense of community. Everyone is so friendly and the trails are gorgeous. The beach supplies a nice relaxing end to the race and the ice-cold soak in the ocean was a plus.

Things Done Right:
Started out so slowly that 6 miles into the race another runner and I were accused of talking too much. This is not a race you want to hot dog in the first half. I placed 24th overall (The Dipsea measures success in overall placing without regard to gender or age) and 3rd in my age division. My age division was tough as we were among the top five women.

Things Done Wrong:
Perhaps I could have pushed the pace a bit more on the return trip. I lost some ground to a runner who knew the course better than me, so I didn’t run as hard as I could have in the last three miles. I ended the race feeling like I could run another several miles.

Any Other Stuff:
The handicap aspect offered a new perspective to racing. I loved to see so many runners finish at the same time--regardless of age. The oldest male runner was 80 and the oldest female 68. A 9 year old boy was the youngest finisher.

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Race for the Mountains — Breckenridge, CO — June 24, 2007

Rick Merriman reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Go Hard
Results: Went Hard
Website: http://www.mountain2mountain.com/race.php

General Summary:
10 miles on the ski slopes, 2 major climbs, steep ascents/descents. Very tough course all run between 9,600’- 11,200’ (above 10,000’ most of the time). Great training for BTMR and PPM/PPA. 100% of race entries will benefit CAI. This race was so well organized and run on race day I never would have thought it was a new race.

Things Done Right:
Went out hard on the first climb and was able to hold a strong effort throughout the whole race. I’m a weak downhiller so I wanted to get as far ahead as possible on the climbs. I was in the top 10 on the climbs, but was passed by 5-6 on the last, steep downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
I thought the course was 5 miles up and 5 down. I was really hurting on the 2nd climb. I was not expecting it and when it started I thought for sure it was going to be short, not at all!

Any Other Stuff:
The course was very well marked, almost all was single track, and, of course, the scenery was great if you could catch your breath and look up.

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Double Trouble 15 & 30k — French Creek State Park, PA — June 24, 2007

Chandra Lloyd reports:
Distance: 15k
Goal: To finish without dying or passing out
Results: 1h40min
Website: http://www.pretzelcitysports.com

General Summary:
Very fun race, extremely well organized, and shady to stay out of the 90-degree heat. Plys, this was definitely the hilliest course I’ve ever run aside from Barr Trail. Pennsylvania has gained new respect in my eyes!

Things Done Right:
Went out slow (after the start, we immediately converged onto a narrow trail. resulting in a mile-long bottleneck), then pushed the rest of the way. Walked up some of the steeper hills.

Things Done Wrong:
This was by far the longest, hardest run I’ve done since being injured, so my body is DEFINITELY telling me off today.

Any Other Stuff:
After the race director lined the 15k and 30k competitors up face-to-face and led us in an insult-shouting match (15k: “You are obsessed, and likely compensating for unusually small body parts,” 30k: “You are pansies, I have people like you at home that do nothing, like my 90-year-old grandfather”), we set off down the trail. It was a beautiful course, mostly rocky singletrack winding through (and up and down) dense forests. We stayed cool since it was mostly in the shade, and I got in some good hill training- there was a mile-long uphill to the 4.5-mile water station, which also ended up being a mile-long screaming downhill at the end, with a nice little uphill finish. The best part was that the park let us use their swimming pool showers, and there were great mugs for the finishers, plus cookies, bagels, and hot dogs for post-race food. If I end up still being stuck here on the east coast next year, I DEFINITELY plan on doing it again!

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Ironman Coeur d’Alene — Coeur d’Alene, ID — June 24, 2007

Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2m run (+2.4m swim, 112m bike)
Goal: sub 12hrs
Results: 11:36
Website: http://www.ironmancda.com

General Summary:
Scenic lakeside course (for the run); huge crowds, great volunteers, and aid stations every mile (complete with wet sponges, chicken broth, coca cola, and the usual stuff).

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated and fueled during the bike course in the hopes of running a fairly strong marathon. As a result, the marathon felt great, and while not superfast, I ‘ran’ it in 4:15.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably could have run the 1st half of the marathon faster, but I was trying to conserve energy for the 2nd half. I was anticipating a bonk that never came.

Any Other Stuff:
I realize this is a running R-Report, but I’ll mention it anyway... the swim was crazy. 15-20 mph headwinds turned Lake Coeur d’Alene into a washing machine. When you add about 100 boats along the outside of the course, then release 2300 swimmers at the same time, it turned the lake into a serving of “people soup"-- absolute pandemonium. It was quite fun. :)

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Run With the Devil 50 miler — Henderson, Nevada — June 30, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish under 11 hour cut-off
Results: 10:46:25 first woman overall
Website: http://calicoracing.com

General Summary:
When you have runners drop out of the half-marathon version of a race at the three mile mark, you know it is a tough race. Only 13 out of the 30 who started the 50 mile distance of the inaugural Run With the Devil 50 miler finished. I used this as a final long training run for my upcoming Badwater Double. It was perfect training conditions: some reported temperatures of over 113. Some park rangers said 122.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated, and was able to keep calories in at about 300 an hour. The slow finish time allowed my legs to feel good the next day.

Things Done Wrong:
Went out WAY to hard. I started at 8 am, the “competitive” start. (there was a 6 am start too) I was the only woman, surrounded by a bunch of good looking, testosterone filled men. Can you blame me for wanting to stay with them? It’s not my fault. I ended up running the first 26 miles around 4:30, which may sound slow, but when it is 110 degrees, it’s not. It only got hotter, and I got “bi*#!-slapped “ by the desert heat, taking over 6 hours on the return trip. This was much hillier than the first 50 miles of Badwater, and I paid for my stupidity and arrogance, especially at mile 36, where I just laid down on a towel for 30 minutes on the ground, making deals with the devil for a finish.

Any Other Stuff:
The volunteers were amazing. Very well organized and supported. There was plenty of ice, electrolytes, salt, gels, cold wet towels, which I wore throughout the last half of the race, and the volunteers had sprayers to cool the runners down. It was almost like having a crew of my own. I would recommend this race for anyone even considering running Badwater. However, it is not a good first time 50 miler, Boston qualifier, or course to underestimate. 17 of the 30 fifty mile starters didn’t finish. Great prizes for those who did manage to finish.

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Mt. Marathon Race — Seward Alaska — July 4, 2007

Eddie Baxter reports:
Distance: 3.5
Goal: 50.57
Results: 54.59
Website: http://seward.com

General Summary:
This race is run on July 4th every year in beautiful
Seward Alaska. Starts in town goes, half mile to the
base of the Mt. then the fun starts. Up a steep cliff
to the trails. Small trails branch off the main trail
and you just take whatever one you can. Passing on the trials on the lower Mt. are almost impossible.
So having speed is nice to get to the Mt sooner than later, something i need to work on.
Then at the top you run back down to town hopefully without breaking anything. Trip down is on loose scree, loose rocks, down a drainage with a couple small waterfalls back down the cliff and back to downtown Seward.

Things Done Right:
Tapered, hydrated, showed up.

Things Done Wrong:
May have not tapered soon enough? Felt a little tired once the race started.

Any Other Stuff:
Average angle of trail 38 degrees.
steepest slope of trail 60 degrees.
Elev. at start 30 ft.
Elev. at top 3022 ft.

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Shawn Erchinger reports:
Distance: 3.5 miles +/-
Goal: sub 50
Results: 50:51
Website: http://cityofseward.net

General Summary:
The 2007 Mt. Marathon Race got off to a shaky start for me. After arriving at the starting line with Eddie Baxter and finding a spot toward the front to start the race took an interesting twist. The starter announced that anyone who hadn’t registered needed to find one of the race volunteers and get signed in. I ignored the first announcement but the second announcement really got my attention. With about 1 minute before the start of the race it was announced that if you hadn’t signed in TODAY at the starting line that you needed to go NOW and find a volunteer and get signed in. As I looked around people started leaving the starting line and heading toward the back of the pack in search of the volunteers. There appeared to be two volunteers with clipboards signing people in. So I got in line and proceeded to wait for my turn to sign in. It turned out to be a big mistake. First off because I assumed they wouldn’t start the race until everyone had signed in and secondly because I unfortunately go t in th

e line of the volunteer that had the list for the second wave of the race which would start 5 minutes after the first wave. Anyway, I was in line waiting to sign in when I heard the gun go off. I turned to look and was absolutely in shock when everyone started running up the street. I did learn a valuable lesson and I won’t make that mistake again...EVER.

The race starts in downtown Seward which is at sea-level and you run uphill on paved streets for almost 1/2 mile before hitting a dirt road which leads to the trailhead and the base of 3,022’ Mt. Marathon. The first wave consists of 150 runners and the second wave consists of roughly 200 runners. The race was limited to 200 runners in the past but due to it’s increasing popularity they run two waves and allow about 350 runners to race.

When I heard the gun go off I shouted my name and bib number to the volunteer with the clipboard and bolted to try and catch the first wave of runners. I’ve never been much of a sprinter but I took off really fast and once I hit the top of the first hill where the road flattens out I was in the pack and starting to work my way toward the front. It was then that a very sharp intense pain shot through my right leg between my knee and my hip. I had strained or possibly pulled a muscle and I backed off a lot to evaluate how it would affect the rest of my race. When I sprint I run only on my toes so I slowed and used a normal heel strike and reduced my stride to see how I’d feel. The pain was still there but it wasn’t sharp or intense and thus I made it to the base of the mountain where the real test would begin. I was farther back in the pack then I would have liked but I wasn’t impeded by very many slower runners as I began to climb. The base of Mt. Marathon is a bottleneck and it’s wise to try and be in

good position at the base in order to avoid having to literally stop and wait of other runners to start up the trail.

The trail is to steep to run and even at it’s easier portions so it’s mostly a power hiking event with rapid leg turnover if you can call it that. I tend to hike up the mountain at somewhere around 100 steps per minute. My leg felt numb which was weird but I wasn’t in pain and I even passed runners early on. The trail is narrow so passing is somewhat difficult. I tend to stand up and run for about 20 steps in order to get around a slower climber. At this point I don’t call anyone “runners” since we are just scrambling up the trail which is very steep. Most people are bent over with their hands on their knees pushing down with their hands in order to assist your legs in carrying you up the mountain. Many people choose to climb on all fours. I do both.

I reached the summit of Mt. Marathon in the top 20. The decent is tricky since you just spent in my case over 36 minutes going uphill. The transition can be difficult. The mountain’s downhill is so steep that it could be easy to fall and many people do. I usually spend the first couple minutes running down the trail conservatively to avoid falling on the scree. The loose shale rock has some give to it which is nice but there are many very hard spots as well. A fall anywhere could end the race. The downhill portion to the halfway mark isn’t to bad but once you go below halfway the trail gos down 3 or 4 waterfalls and the rocky terrain is hard to navigate with a lot of speed. As you approach the base of the mountain you must climb down a very large cliff that’s been the downfall of many a runner. The good news is the local hospital is only a block to two away but I advise checking out the trail and finding a safe route down the cliff. The fastest runners go right down the face of the cliff but I& #146;ve al

ways chosen to take the trail off to the left and work my way around the cliff. It’s longer but safer.

I finished the race in 50:51 which was good enough for 15th place.

My time didn’t do justice to the amount of training I did so I’m hopeful that I can run under 50 minutes in 2008 by a couple of minutes.

Things Done Right:
My training was adequate to accomplish my goal of running a sub 50 and my pre-race plan was well thought out and would have resulted in my running a sub 50.

Things Done Wrong:
I should never have left the starting line. It wasn’t part of my pre-race plan so I should have ignored the announcement since it was clearly incredibly stupid to have people sign in a minute before the start of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
In the future I’m going to stick to my race plans and not let anything cause me to loose focus on what I plan to accomplish in any race.

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Leadville Heavy Half Marathon (15.5M) — Leadville, CO — July 7, 2007

William Keller reports:
Distance: 15.5M
Goal: 3:10
Results: 3:06:46 (unofficial)
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/

General Summary:
This out and back starts at the old gym on 6th St in Leadville and follows paved road for about a mile, then to dirt road for about 3 miles and the rest of the outbound on rocky and uneven jeep trail to the top of Mosquito Pass (13,100).

Things Done Right:
Barr Camp (and sometimes above) every week for the past 6 weeks helped for the climbing and descent, although 3/2/1s would be better practice but for the late snow. Hydrated and ate well before and the morning of the event. Started slow and watched many people who were way ahead of me blow up during the climb above 12,000’. Also passed a few people on the downhill. Beat my goal to the top by 10 minutes (1:50), my overall time by a few minutes and placed pretty well (for me!) for the overall standings and my age group (35-39) (official results not out yet)

Things Done Wrong:
Not sure my body was coordinated today at the higher altitude. My HR monitor showed me staying at 149 avg, which isn't very high, but the oxygen to get my legs moving just didn’t seem to be there. I tried to get my heart rate up at the top but my legs were like jello. I also just started running with contacts and on the downhill the wind was about 30mph most of the way resulting in some dry eyes and blurry vision. Going to have to carry some drops. Probably should’ve drank more since I only went through about 25 oz or so the entire trip despite two gels and two salt caps. My calves were cramping a bit the last two miles but still managed to accelerate to the finish.

Any Other Stuff:
The bulk of the climb is above 11,500 and some is pretty steep. I can’t say enough how rocky the top 3rd is. Descending fast will draw blood (I saw 3 in front of me go down, one hard). Since the marathon and half are done at the same time, I spent all of my descent taking crummy lines avoiding the 400 or so marathoners working their way up (no fault of theirs). Very friendly crowd with lots of chatter and encouragement both up and down. Aid stations were fantastic with grapes, watermelon, chips, pretzels, powerade, water and other light fare (but I only got water twice). Very nicely done short sleeve performance shirt and a really nice “heavy half” medal when you finish. Well organized by the same pros that bring you the Leadville Trail 100. Wanted to get out of the altitude and didn’t stick around for the 5pm awards or Mexican buffet.

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Leadville Trail Marathon — Leadville, Colorado — July 7, 2007

Tibor Kiss reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 5:00
Results: 4:49:04
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
I was a little sick and did not taper, so I set my goal less ambitious. I thought my time last year plus 10 minutes was reasonable.

Things Done Right:
I started doing speed training this year. I still can’t get out Thursday nights with the club, but I did it once a week on my own. It made me strong on the way up, I shaved 7 minutes off of my time to the turnaround point compared to last year — and I felt I really did not push it hard at all.

Things Done Wrong:
Three 21 mile training runs do not make up for the lack of a 26 mile training run. I should have had at least one really long 25+ miler. At around 21 miles I got really tired and lost all the 7 minute advantage I had accumulated to the top. I ended up with essentially the same finishing time as I did last year.
Something was off with my hydration as well. I did drink enough Gatorade and water mix, but it just made me sick. I had cold and congestion, that may have been part of the deal.

Any Other Stuff:
Downtown Leadville (about 10100ft) to Mosquito Pass (about 13150ft), total elevation gain nearly 6000ft, mostly on jeep road, covered with loose rocks.
This race is tough on the legs and joints. Your feet get ‘tenderized’ real well by the small rocks on the road by the time you finish. Trail running shoes might be a good idea. Good preparation for PPM, although quite different since there is about 3 miles of uphill running between miles 17 and 20 and a couple of short but steep uphills thereafter.

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Summer Roundup — Bear Creek Park, Colo Spgs — July 8, 2007

Michael Everson reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: Run the whole course
Results: Ran the whle course

General Summary:
Nice day, fairly cool at start. I never ran the course before. Some pretty good hills for first 3.5 miles (especially mile 3). Start was bad because of the bottleneck at the trailhead.

Things Done Right:
Slept good, took one energy gel, and relied on the volunteers for water.

Things Done Wrong:
Started back in the pack. Couldn’t get rolling until about 1.25 miles in to the race.

Any Other Stuff:
I like the trails we ran on, but to try and get 600+ people on to an 8 foot wide trail in 1/4 mile is impossible. The hills were good, and I could definitely see myself training on this course.

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William Keller reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: Finish (ran Leadville Heavy Half on July 7)
Results: Didn’t embarrass myself 1:12:36
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com/

General Summary:
Out and back in Bear Creek Park and High Drive with 1,000’ climbing.

Things Done Right:
Trained on the course with the PPRR folks on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the past 5 weeks. Ran my own pace on the way up rather than getting caught in the fray. Pushed where I could on the hills, knew the course very well. Was steady and accelerating the higher up High Drive I got. Just let loose and ran really fast on the downhills to make up time. Used others around me on the course as targets to reel them in on the uphill and downhill. Had good success motivating myself with that strategy, particularly on the downhill. Established a good goal to beat for next year. Good pre-race warm up.

Things Done Wrong:
Must...get...lead...out..of..pants...on...uphills

Any Other Stuff:
Made the mistake of registering really early for the Leadville Heavy Half as a goal race before I was fully aware of the TCR dates other than the Ascent and the BTMR date...cramming all of these together is pushing it a bit for my experience level. On the flip side, after BTMR — Ascent is the only focus

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Fred Schrank reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: 1:30
Results: 1:19

General Summary:
This was my first race. Ever! The altitude is such a adjustment for a flatlander / lowlander. The temp. and humidity were great comparing to my norm.

Things Done Right:
I had a blast. Brought my camera and enjoyed the morning run and took pictures of scenery. Downhill pace was nice, good energy level, running form and strength. Passed a lot of folks. Lungs felt fine.

Things Done Wrong:
PreRun: Training for only few weeks which did not exceed 3 miles, live at 800 ft elevation. Had a party the night before in the Springs, got to bed late, not sure what to have for breakfast.
During Run: Started out in the back of the back, not aggressive mind-set to trust myself ability. (mental doubt mistake) So many people to pass the first two miles on the trail and then the trail goes to single file after mile marker number 2. Not sure how much energy to expend to pass on the way up, so my race started at High Drive uphill. Uphill pace was mostly walking trapped at the other’s runners jog. Had way to much energy at the end of the run.

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Diane L. Repasky reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: 1:15:00
Results: 1:13:52
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
A Trail Run along the trails of bear creek park, mostly uphill on the way out, mostly downhill on the way back. Beautiful views along the way.

Things Done Right:
Taper, hydrate, carbed up. Rested the day before.

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe could have pushed the uphill a little more, it was a great day for racing not too hot. A lot of shade up High Drive.

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Derek Engard reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: 55
Results: 55:32

General Summary:
Great race, especially since I caught a cold at the beginning of the week.

Things Done Right:
Good even pace, and let people pass on the up-hill. To catch later...

Things Done Wrong:
Got a head cold the week of the race!

Any Other Stuff:
I was surprised only water was provided on course?

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Fred Baxter reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1:02
Results: 59:52

General Summary:
Nice Run Most Of It On Dirt Trail Some Road

Things Done Right:
Pre Race Massage Sarah Altonen 719-291-1723
The Best

Things Done Wrong:
Should Have Went Out Faster

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Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: Finish
Results: 1:45

General Summary:
Overall race went OK. Paced myself well and felt this was a good wake-up call for the PPM.

Things Done Right:
Hydration two days prior to the race. Familiarity with the course also helped.

Things Done Wrong:
Lack of sleep week before race.

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Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: Get my knee through one more race
Results: Accomplished goal

General Summary:
Fun race. Always happy to see so many familiar faces.

Things Done Right:
Wore knee brace and it seemed to help on the downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
Forgot sunscreen

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Chris Bombria reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: Finish in under 90 min
Results: 87 min

General Summary:
Good run. Used as a training run. Wanted to maintain constant pace for uphill and downhill portions (slower up than down :). Also worked on cadence and keeping heart rate in a tight zone.

Things Done Right:
Things went well for me. Felt fresh after the run. Was able to keep to my goals for pace and heart rate. Keeping a quick cadence (~80) on the steeps, up and down, was the way to go. Kept me from getting pounded.

Things Done Wrong:
Hydration was good, used my own energy drink, Gator aid doesn’t agree with me. Need to up my carbs from ~35g per hour to ~60, last 30min were tough. I cycle a lot and I’m still working on proper fueling for running.

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: Faster than previous years.
Results: 1:02:34
Website: http://www.summerroundup.com/results.htm

General Summary:
I was really happy with my time this year! I really enjoy this run and what a great turn out!

Things Done Right:
Perfect attendance for all of the SRU training runs and consistent training all spring!

Things Done Wrong:
I feel as though I could have “given more” on the uphill portion of the race.

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Chaz Lalonde reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1 hour
Results: 1;00;49

General Summary:
mostly uphill on way out and of course downhill back. Except for a small section the course is trail. It is well known to me as I live in the area. I do prefer running section 16/Intemann.

Things Done Right:
Good 2 nights sleep.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have carried a small water bottle.

Any Other Stuff:
Pablo, Edgar and I ran[sort of] the top 3 miles of Barr Trail immediately following the race. No records for the top 3 though.

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Pablo Najera reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: 1:00hr
Results: 58:58

General Summary:
Good training race

Things Done Right:
Run the course 2times before the race

Things Done Wrong:
Hold back a little on the way up.

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Barr Trail Mountain Race — Manitou Spgs, CO — July 15, 2007

Timothy Edwards reports:
Distance: 12 rugged miles
Goal: Keep up with Glen Ash
Results: Glen beat my 2h:41m:52s

General Summary:
Went out right, had good pacing but as I drew near Barr Camp my feet started screaming with pain: toenails and blisters from shoes feeling too small. Had trouble getting down as the pain kept me from running full speed.

Things Done Right:
Hydration, and I kept a strong mental attitude that this race is a good reality check for the Ascent / Marathon — only 5 weeks away, folks!

Things Done Wrong:
Washed my shoes and they must have shrunk some when dried, or my feet swelled up! Tight shoes caused relentless pain, making it hard to concentrate on racing.

Any Other Stuff:
I really liked the smerfs and the toga outfits. Thanks for the water sprays too — it was way too hot for this Mtn Man. Thanks to all the volunteers — you folks are appreciated. It was a tough race.

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William Keller reports:
Distance: 12M
Goal: 2:35
Results: 2:31:55

General Summary:
Mooo Mooo Baaaa Baaaa in the Ws. That was fun. Pass and be passed. Hot temps but didn’t feel it like I did 6 weeks ago.

Things Done Right:
Went fast up and faster down (ummm, for me, not compared to Matt and the 166 people between us...) Took my own hand bottle with me and saved a lot of time running (yes, actually running!) through the aid stations by drinking on my own pace and time. Ran as much as I could on the way up in the right spots. Knew the course in my sleep. Set PRs the whole way up and down. Ran the whole way down, sometimes fast, lol.

Things Done Wrong:
Missed a plan gel intake at NoName in favor of blowing through the aid station to gain position on some people in the group I had been with. Blew through aid in the Ws also. Although I kept ahead of the group and passed a few more, maybe I could’ve been more energized the last 20 minutes.

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Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: Course record, win age group
Results: 1:56, won age group
Website: http://runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Before the race I was nervous, but quietly confident. I knew my main competition in the 50-54 age group for the 12-mile Barr Trail Race to Barr Camp and back would be the formidable Eddie Baxter. Eddie had won the 50-54 age group in the Pikes Peak Ascent last year in a jaw-dropping time of 2:44. But it wasn’t until I rechecked the entries on-line the morning of the race that I saw Senovio Torres from New Mexico had also entered. Senovio holds the records for the Pikes Peak Marathon for the age groups 45-49 and 50-54, and for the Pikes Peak Ascent, age group 50-54. Two years ago he set the record (beaten last year by John Victoria) for the Barr Trail Race (I also set the record that year, but finished 2nd to Senovio).

In the early going, keeping track of my competition, I reached the top of the W’s in the lead at 22 minutes and change-about where I needed to be. Rebekka handed me a bottle of Cytomax, which I sipped before dropping it at No-Name Creek. With the day’s forecast of blistering heat the extra hydration was critical but I didn’t want to carry any extra weight such as a camelback. My legs felt a little tight. Had I left my race at the top of the W’s? Eddie caught up to me in the flat stretch before the arch and smoothly passed me. Before I knew it he was out of sight! Man! -he must have hit the glide path!

In the easier portions of the trail near the 7.8 mile sign and beyond I fell in with Buzz Burrell. I didn’t know him but he looked like an old fart so I asked him for his age group. He started laughing. Thinking he must have misunderstood me I asked him again. He said he was laughing at my question. Finally I told him I was 52 and he realized that I was also an old fart and he told me he was 55. He ended up finishing just behind me, setting the course record for the 55-59 age group.

When I reached the ½ mile-to-go sign to Barr Camp a glance at my watch showed 1:07. Damn! Too slow for an age group record. I knew I had to reach Barr Camp in 1:11 to have a good shot at the age group record. That was not going to happen as the fastest I had run that last half mile recently was seven minutes. As I approached Barr Camp the next question was where would I see Eddie? Through the meadow, past the bench, I finally saw him coming down right at the fence next to Barr Camp. He had about 100 feet on me. I made the turn and coming down, right at about the same place on the fence up came Senovio. At the turn-around I was about 100 feet behind Eddie and 100 feet ahead of Senovio.

I caught back up to Buzz Burrell, and fell in behind him. We moved across the bridge and up to lightning point--then down to the slight up-hill leading to the 7.8 mile sign--I surged past Buzz-now it was time to turn on the “crazy legs” and see if I could make Eddie come back to me. I flew down the down-hills and pushed the up-hills until finally I saw Eddie ahead of me. He was coming back steadily. No need to push too hard-just let him come back. When I passed him I put on a hard surge. I looked back on the switchbacks above No-Name Creek, saw that he was a couple switchbacks behind, and relaxed the pace. Cruising down towards the top of the W’s someone was breathing down my neck-I asked him if he was ready to pass and the youngster blew by quickly and was soon out of sight - young fresh legs. About here I thought, “What about Senovio?” Maybe he was gunning for me! Senovio was a formidable down-hill runner-maybe he was closing on me! I couldn’t relax. The rest of the way I ran s cared, which is a good way to

run! Finally reaching the final stretch of pavement near my house I looked back and only saw Buzz Burrell about 50 yards back--no one else in sight. I could coast. I finished in 1hr56min. Eddie was 31 seconds back with Senovio another 7 seconds behind Eddie. And I would get a nice new pair of La Sportiva Trail Running shoes for my efforts!

Things Done Right:
Lots of training at altitude. Have run to the summit about six times this year.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t run fast enough.

Any Other Stuff:
Winner: Best Race Organization.

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 13 Miles
Goal: To help where needed
Results: Split Time Volunteer — No Name Creek
Website: http://runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
Carried several gallon water and Gatorade jugs to the first aid station at the incline overlook at which point Willie, Draper and I opted to climb the remainder of the incline to reach our race start vantage point. At the start of the race we headed up and over to No Name Creek to setup the timing station, surrounded by the Woodland Park High School Blue Man Group. Timing went smoothly, with Willie coaxing the all the Blue People to MAKE SOME NOISE!

Things Done Right:
Swept the course from No Name down to Top of the Ws, remember runners to drop trash on the trail, especially gel packs, most importantly gel pack tops!

Things Done Wrong:
Nada.

Any Other Stuff:
Once again a very successful race, thanks to everyone who raced or worked. A special thank you to Jeff and the Colorado Running Company for the ice-cold watermelons!

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John Mills reports:
Distance: 12 m
Goal: Sub-3:00
Results: 2:51

General Summary:
Great race.

Things Done Right:
Barr Trail training.

Things Done Wrong:
Leg cramps

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Michael Everson reports:
Distance: 12 M
Goal: 2:20
Results: 2:23
Website: http://RunPikesPeak.com

General Summary:
Everyone in IC knows course. It’s Barr Trail and it’s wonderful. Weather: A little on the hot side. Start line a little cramped, but who cares? it’s Barr Trail!

Things Done Right:
Banana before start. Gels left in car since they had them on the trail. Took a little water with me.

Things Done Wrong:
Slept on couch (my daughter was sick and slept in my place). Didn’t get much sleep. Listened to crappy seventies music all night on XM and couldn’t get it out of my head. Why couldn’t they play Fleetwood Mac?

Any Other Stuff:
I love the water stations. The kids do a great job of competing to win the aid station challenge. I espcially like the cheers from the Incline station on the way down. I haven’t run this race since 04 and I want to keep doing it.

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Dan Turk reports:
Distance: 12.85 miles
Goal: beat last year’s 1:59:48
Results: 1:55:07
Website: http://runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
I had fantasies of trying to set a new age-group record for the 44-49 male age group, but that was a pie-in-the-sky dream! My second goal was to do about 1:53 (I’d done 1:59:48 last year), and I thought this was realistic. I knew I’d have to see how iI felt as I ascended the W’s, and go from there, since making 1:47 would have required me to do around 11:30/mile (1:09 to Barr Camp) on the ascent and around 6:20/mile (38 min) on the descent — pretty fast compared to my times from last year!

Well, I didn’t make either of those goals, but still ran fast enough to win my age group again this year and to improve by about 4:30 over last year’s time, even including a roll I took on the way down at about the 11 mile mark. To run a 1:47 will require some *serious* training, if I even have it in me to move that fast anyway... :) Besides, Bernie is in my age group next year, so the competition just jumped up an order of magnitude, and he’s already running 7 min faster than the 44-49 year old male course record! :)

Things Done Right:
Held the pace pretty good on the way up, and was able to “fly” on the way down.

Rolling instead of sliding when I fell at the 11 mile mark made my scrapes much less than they could have been.

Things Done Wrong:
Took a roll on the way down at about the 11 mile mark. I don’t recall the specifics, but know there were hikers on the trail at that point, and I may have run into them as I tried to avoid them and at the same time negotiate the uneven trail in that section.

Any Other Stuff:
Too many hikers on the trail who didn’t all get out of the way for the downhill runners. (Most moved aside for us, but some did not.)

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Rick Merriman reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2:00:00
Results: 2:22:00

General Summary:
Great race. Loved watching the leaders come flying down the trail.

Things Done Right:
Can’t really find much to say here.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not taper. I kept feeling better and stronger on runs the past 2 weeks and just kept training. My body decided to shut down on race day. Won’t make that same mistake in August.

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Derek Engard reports:
Distance: 12mi
Goal: under 2 hours
Results: 1:54:50

General Summary:
Great race as usual!

Things Done Right:
Kept a good even pace and broke my goal. No ankle sprains this year!!

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe could have pushed the last mile into Barr Camp harder.

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Pablo Najera reports:
Distance: 12miles
Goal: 2:05
Results: 2:03

General Summary:
Great Race!!!

Things Done Right:
I did pace myself pretty good on the way up.

Things Done Wrong:
Cramp 1/2 mile to the finish.

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Larry C Miller reports:
Distance: 12.8
Goal: volunteer and live
Results: managed it all

General Summary:
hot, but nice cool wind, made it over a good race day, and it went off real nice. it show in 5 records for the race.

Keep Running

Things Done Right:
great, High school at finish area they did a sweet job

Things Done Wrong:
one problem one runner down at incline, my hair turn gray, whenever I hear a runner is down, no matter whom it is.

Any Other Stuff:
if only the first runner’s would sweep off the rock in the trail it would be faster for the rest of the field,
And the last runners puts them all back.

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Jon Magistro reports:
Distance: barr camp and back
Goal: be most improved
Results: was most improved

General Summary:
What a great race this year!! I accomplished everything I wanted to for this year!!!

Things Done Right:
Trained and tapered. I bought Matt’s book this past winter on training for the Ascent & Marathon and was following it closely till my accident (more on that below). I spent more time training for the downhill and was able to lose additional wieght this year.

Things Done Wrong:
I broke my toe about 2 months before the race and that caused me to have to ditch running and take to the road bike for 6 weeks straight. before the broken toe my goal was to break 3 hours for the first time but then it was just to be the most improved. I came close to the 3 hour mark and was most improved this year (22:44 faster).

Any Other Stuff:
I just love this race!! the kids at the aid stations are fantastic and the committee gives a ton back to the community. It is well worth my almost 2 hour drive just to come down and support this race.

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Stephen Martin reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2hrs :20mins
Results: 2hrs :24 mins

General Summary:
Felt pretty good about my overall time. Uphill into Barr Camp was a bit slower than I thought it would be. It Didn’t feel too hot running up the W’s, in fact didn’t really feel the effects of the heat until hitting the lower W’s on the way down.

Things Done Right:
Kept an even pace going into Barr Camp.
Stayed hydrated throughout.
Felt like I pushed as hard as I could on the downhill, from No Name to the finish.

Things Done Wrong:
Behind goal time into Barr Camp.
Could have been faster down from Barr Camp to No Name.

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 12m
Goal: Beat last year's time.
Results: 2:15:43
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/index.htm

General Summary:
What a great run/race. Was it ever hot coming down though!

Things Done Right:
Lots of training.

Things Done Wrong:
I wish I could have ran Thursdays with the IC.

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Vicki Martin reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2hrs 30m.
Results: 2 hrs 39m.
Website: http://runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Race was Great as usual. I do love this race for all of it’s good will I experience.

Things Done Right:
Felt ready to go, well rested and hydrated.

Things Done Wrong:
I don’t think I did anything wrong just wish I could have been faster.

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High Mountain 25K — Leadville, CO — July 15, 2007

Marilyn Goodloe reports:
Distance: 25 km
Goal: Time under 3:00 hours. Top three masters woman.
Results: 2:58, fourth masters woman, seventh woman overall.
Website: http://www.hminet.org

General Summary:
The course is a +/- 25-kilometer (15 miles) loop with 790 meters (2,600 ft.) of climbing on each lap. Elevation is from 10,000 — 12,000 feet. The first lap of the 50 km is counter-clockwise around Turquoise Lake, past May Queen Campground, up Sugarloaf Mountain, and down to the HMI campus. For the 50 km, the second lap is in reverse. There is a four-hour cut off for the first lap.

Things Done Right:
Ran a pretty even race. Hydrated well.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably did not push myself hard enough. Missed the third place masters by 4 1/2 minutes.

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High Mountain 50K — Leadville, CO — July 15, 2007

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: 6:30; finish
Results: 6:02: something
Website: http://www.hminet.org/page.php?pname=programs/events

General Summary:
Low-keyed race in Leadville with 100+ runners doing either the 25K or two loop 50K.

One runner GPSed the course at over 32 miles, but the added miles is more bang for the buck.

Things Done Right:
Went out easy on the first loop, about the same time as last year, but I’d run WS100 3 weeks prior to last years run.

I was faster up the Power Line this year helping take time off the second loop.

Stayed hydrated and eat gels every 45 minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
2 bathroom stops. I eat too much the night before.

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USAF Academy Half Marathon — Santa Fe Trail on USAF Academy — July 21, 2007

Marcus reports:
Distance: Half Marathon
Goal: Sub 1:30
Results: 1:23:50

General Summary:
The race started at the North Gate entrance to the Air Force Academy on the Santa Fe trail and proceeded south to Ice Lake, around Ice Lake, and back to the start at North Gate.

Things Done Right:
Ran hard at the start and kept running hard throughout.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran the first half a little too fast and started to die trying to gain elevation on the way back.

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Badwater 135 Ultramarathon — Badwater, Death Valley, CA — July 23-24, 2007

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 135 miles
Goal: set a PR for first 135 miles, go on to do double
Results: 42:53:08 a PR of 3 hours
Website: http://www.badwater.com

General Summary:
I had meant for this race to be an attempt to set a woman’s record for a double crossing of Death Valley, which means you run from the highest point in the continental United States to the highest. ( Badwater, 282 ft. below sea level to summit of Mt. Whitney, at 14,495 ft.)A nasty hail and lightening storm made my crew and I turn back less than two miles from the summit of Mt. Whitney, at mile 144, at 13,600 feet. I still finished the official Badwater course with a PR, as did many of the runners, with this year’s bizarrely cool weather. (cool for Death Valley, 110 degrees)

Things Done Right:
Trained obsessively, ran a ton of races all over the country to prepare. Ran it like I wanted to. Went out like an idiot, had fun doing it, didn’t listen to conventional advice: “don’t run so many races, gain weight, start out slow, blah, blah, blah...” I got to Furnace Creek, mile 17.4 under three hours, and got to Stovepipe Wells, (mile 42) in less than 8.5 hours. Even though it wasn’t as hot, it sure was humid. There were even a few drops of rain around mile 30. The 19 mile climb up to the top of Townes Pass went well too, but then the wheels fell off a little. I’m sure the letters I, D, I, O, T, are still lying under the desert sand around Panamint Springs, mile 72, from my alphabet soup I ate earlier in the race. There was a lot of temperature variation this year. I was shivering at night. But I still kept going, slowly, on to the next climb of Father Crowley’s Point. I was really glad I brought Pedialyte with me. that helped get my stomach back in line. I also had a wo nderful crew, whose endless energy an

d sense of humor made this my best Badwater 135 so far.

Things Done Wrong:
Too many vehicles! After 40 miles into the race, nobody could find a damn thing, because nobody could remember which crew vehicle it was in, and if there was something I really needed, it was in the other vehicle.

What else... didn’t get to do the double because of a wicked storm. That was really hard, because I felt so good, despite having over 140 miles on my legs, with less than three hours of sleep. I had paid a lot of attention to calories during the race, so I would have lots of energy and strength to get up Mt. Whitney, and having to turn around with the summit house in sight reduced me to tears, after huddling against a granite cliff in a storm for an hour. If there is one lesson to be learned here, it is that the mountain doesn’t care, and it is Mt. Whitney who determines if you are going to do the double. One crew member suggested that I just run all the way back down to Badwater anyway, after all, he said, I came within two miles to summiting. But that was out of the question, as the spiritual link just wouldn’t be there, and it’s just not a double unless you reach the summit. Period. Another runner suggested I go up Whitney the next day, but then not only did crew members have to get bac k to their lives, but

I would have no chance at all of breaking the current women’s double crossing record of 143 hours. I saw no point in that.

Any Other Stuff:
Not reaching a goal is hard for anyone. Even though it was a storm that took me out, and I did everything I could, there is still a tremendous sense of disappointment. I don’t regret trying, and will do it again next year, despite what some dip-shits have said: “it’s dangerous, you could get hurt, the Badwater Double is not even a real race...do the Grand Slam instead, you’re crazy....” I can feel the sirens of the desert already luring me back to Death Valley, and the spirit of Mt. Whitney, ( an amazingly beautiful, surreal climb)beckons me back to her trails.

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Grand Island Trail Marathon — Grand Island, Michigan Upper Peninsula — July 28, 2007

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:15
Results: 3:19
Website: http://www.greatlakesendurance.com/race_info.htm

General Summary:
Rebekka and I flew in to Marquette, Michigan for a mini-vacation and to add one more marathon state (44) and high point (44) to my list. The high point, Mount Arvon, 1929’ was an adventure in itself that took us on logging roads some seven miles. That was the just the start of it though, as I tried to take a “short cut” back. 30 miles of tortuous worse-than-4W-drive roads later and we wound up where we had started...

The next day we took a ferry from Munising to Grand Island for the race start at 0700. Grand Island, mostly private until the 1990’s when most of it was purchased by the Park Service and turned into a National Recreation Area, is a 23,000 acre mostly uninhabited island. There are a smattering of summer cottages along the southern shore.

The course was outstanding. Up and down on wagon roads and single track and even a couple stints along the beach. At mile 10 I had to make an emergency stop and lost five places. I gained four of them back by race end, but the one I didn’t catch was the winner of my age group. I took second in 50-54 and eighth overall.

This is one of the most enjoyable trail marathons I’ve had the pleasure of running and recommend it highly. This time of year on the U.P. is delightful, with minimal bugs and cool temperatures. Take the boat ride along the Pictured Rocks National Seashore to round out your visit. Spectacular scenery!

Things Done Right:
Trained on trails.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t visit port-a-john before the race.

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Wild West Relay — Fort Collins, CO to Steamboat Springs, CO — August 3-4, 2007

Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 195 miles! (I ran 35)
Goal: To survive
Results: Team results 27 hours 52 minutes (unofficial)
Website: http://www.wildwestrelay.com/

General Summary:
Los Rapidos! I joined this team earlier in the year thinking it would be a great last training run for the PP marathon. After I joined I realized how demanding it was going to actually be and to tell you the truth I was a bit uncertain about actually running the race. We joined as a 6X6 ultra team. We had three women and two men on the team, each having to run six legs of a 195 mile course from Fort Collins to Steamboat Springs. Every leg was broken down into different mileage and labeled with a different difficulty rating. I was given the leg ranked with the highest rating due to it being mainly ascending the passes and the overall length of the legs. I ran a total of 34+ miles, gained a total of 3944+ ft of elevation and topping out around 10,000 ft during my 6 legs. We all ran during the day, in the middle of the night and I had the opportunity to run during the sunrise. Between legs there was very little time for any rest. I may have had a total of two hours of broken sleep and somehow my last two legs en ded up being my best. What a truly great experience! I cannot even begin to explain how fun this race was and how wonderful it was to be a part of a team to finish this race. Sara, Marc, Calina, Sydney, and Melissa are all great runners! Thanks for the invitation to join the team! Wade and Lisa thanks for driving and taking care of all of the logistics! Without you this would have never been even remotely possible.

Things Done Right:
In between my legs I pulled out my sleeping bag and stayed off of my feet as much as possible. I hydrated well kept up on my food intake.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t get out of the vehicle or rest my legs as much as I should have before my hardest leg and I paid for it. The 8.8 miler I ran in Wyoming was brutal! It was dark and I could not see the hills coming. I was tired, I had stomach issues and my morale was down. Overall I got burned out on recovery/electrolyte drinks and by the end of my legs I was running on mainly water alone.

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Maritsa Yupa reports:
Distance: 19 miles
Goal: complete all my three legs
Results: Our team came in 2nd.

General Summary:
Great time and I would do it again. Thanks to my friend Jonathon Zezulka for inviting me to join his team.

Things Done Right:
Positive attitude the whole time.

Things Done Wrong:
n/a

Any Other Stuff:
I ran three legs for this race. my favorite one was probably the second one where I was running through the national forest area.

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Pikes Peak Ascent — Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO — August 18, 2007

John Garner reports:
Distance: 13.32
Goal: 4:00
Results: 4:20ish
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/

General Summary:
After last years disappointing result (mostly due to dehydration), I cranked up the training, kept a log of everything, and did what I thought it would take to hit my goal of under 4 hours.

I didn't take into account the way my system would react to the water served at the aid stations. The incline aid station had the usual ‘green hose’ flavor to it. I’ve had better but not too bad. The stuff at noname, well, that was a different story...

The lemon lime Gatorade had a strong grape flavor to it and my stomach started to loudly protest. I don't know if it was a combination of that with last night's dinner, but it was all downhill from there. I was barely able to drink anything due to the taste and the way it made me feel. When I got to bob’s road, I dumped what was in that bottle and refilled. While it did not have the same taste, my stomach was already pissed and trying to force anything else down only made it madder. I knew I was in trouble. Little did I realize just how much trouble.

I started to lose time after noname, and even more time after the bottomless pit sign.

After throwing up what little was in my stomach 5 ft past the A-Frame sign, I did feel a little better, but by then the dehydration caused by not drinking was too much, and the death march to finish was on.

Needless to say, my goal of 4:00 was shot when I got to A-Frame, and I knew it. My other goal of 4:15 went by-by when I hit the 1 to go marker, At that point I was just trying to get to the end of the thing before I collapsed and hurt myself even more.

Things Done Right:
Showed up well rested, well hydrated and ready to go.

Set a good pace (based on HR) till No Name.

Was still on track for a sub-4 by A-Frame.

Things Done Wrong:
Where to start:

Once again, my main issue was the hydration. I weighed myself as soon as I got home, and discovered that I had managed to loose over 4lb. This is after downing 16+ oz at the top and another 24+ when I got home. Thus, I would estimate that I lost a 7-8lb of water weight on the course. While great for those who want to do a crash diet, this is not a good sign as a runner.

For a standard IC run up to barr camp and back, I will typically down 64+ oz of Gatorade. For some folks, this a lot, but for me, that is normal. Thus the thought of packing 100+ oz of my own water for the ascent is not very attractive. Thus I went with the ‘fill the bottle at the aid station’ approach. I probably would have been better off packing 80oz of known good stuff with me, taking the speed hit and then taking my chances in the last 2 miles or so (at least I would have been hydrated for those). My time at Barr camp was not too far off my previous PR during an IC run, so it will probably be on my to do list for next year.

To add insult to injury, I also lost at least 8 minutes after A-Frame when I stopped along the course. My head was spinning, my upper back was killing me, my legs were cramping and I probably looked like a guy who just fell out of a bar at 2am. I tried to keep each stoppage under 60 seconds per, but from reviewing the pace stats on my Garmin, it was a bit more than that. If I could get those 8 min back, the 4:15 would have been in reach. That said, the first stop was to puke and the ones after that were due to the fact that I was shuffling my feet and not really making any measurable forward progress anyway.

Comments on Calculator:
For those who want to see the anatomy of a meltdown, here are my splits:

Ruxton: 3:56
Hydro: 9:08
Noname: 32:11
7.5 21:09
Barr: 24:01
Bottomless: 18:56
A-Frame: 35:25
2: 29:24
1: 26:38
Finish: 34:26 (forgot to stop the watch, so this may be a minute or two off)

The splits can be summed up as follows: 3:50 pace till I hit the 7.5 sign, and a death march after bottomless pit.

As always, the Ruxton split is a throwaway for anybody running slower than 3:30 since everybody runs to Ruxton :-) That said, I probably went out too fast, but my HR monitor was reading way too high (175?!? wtf) and didn't start providing realistic readings till about 5 minutes in.

Any Other Stuff:
Next year's goal will be to solve the hydration issue and finally break through this slump. (of course, since I’ll be in wave 2 again, I just have to hope I can get registered.)

One final thing: until A-Frame (when my speed dropped and everybody caught me), It was nice to not have to run in a crowd. Unlike last year, once I hit the trail, the passing was easy and there were not that many folks in front of me. I guess there are advantages to being in wave 2 :-)

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Beverly Weaver reports:
Distance: 13.32
Goal: 5:55
Results: 6:14:34
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
13.32 miles up the side of Pikes Peak — we all know what this race is like.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the Incline Club since November.
Ran at the top to get used to the altitude.
Drank Gatorade or water at every aid station.
Carried a little water to drink between aid stations.
Ate GU every hour.
Kept up the CFM (constant forward motion) during the last few miles. Passed a lot of folks sitting around on the rocks.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t drop enough weight.
Could have run more times above 10,000 feet.
Went out too fast trying to make the new cutoff times at Barr Camp and A-Frame and got into trouble the last 4 miles.

Comments on Calculator:
I used the calculator which I think is very accurate. However, the expected times wouldn’t get me to Barr Camp and A-Frame in time to make the cutoffs and run a 6 hour pace. I wanted to be sure to make those two cutoffs and was running at 5:30 pace which is really too fast for me. Consequently, I was in more trouble at the top than I would have been if I had run slower on the W’s.

Any Other Stuff:
No bad weather at the top. However, it was warm and humid, which makes the race difficult (or should I say more difficult than usual?)

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Dan Smith reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: Under 4 hours
Results: 4:06:59

General Summary:
Warmer than expected but less humidity than what I am used to (Minnesota). So I never had to don the long sleeves. Coming from sea level I always expect to suffer more after Barr Camp and this year was no different. However the performance degradation was more than I had expected. OK, I am a year older but losing 15 minutes in a year was disheartening. It’s always a thrill to finish in front of a supportive crowd on the summit and I was happy that the elements were conducive to bringing out the spectators. Quite a different weather environment from three days previously when a vicious storm swept over the peak while I was attempting a crash acclimatization program.

Things Done Right:
Base mileage was adequate if not overwhelming. I tapered quite a bit and resisted the urge to train hard in the last week. Mentally I was focused and yet relaxed. My movement in the early stages of the race was conservative but I never lost an opportunity to ease past slower runners. Rather than running to close the gap with the next bunch I would power walk instead. I was right on my pace through Barr Camp and did not feel like I was straining at all. I also decided that the course has enough aid so that carrying 16 ounces of water in a fanny pack isn’t necessary. See the next paragraph for a rebuttal to this idea however.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t do as much hill training this year because my job was kicking my butt pretty badly and time crunches never favored my going out for afternoon and evening workouts. In my zeal to stay relaxed during the three days prior to the race I did lots of sightseeing and lost more body water than I realized. When I became intensely thirsty during the race I realized I had let myself become dehydrated prior to starting, a rookie mistake if there ever was one. If I had carried my water bottle would it have helped? Doubt it, since I think I had a water deficit before I had even started.

Comments on Calculator:
I like it. I wish I could do more altitude training so I wouldn’t lose so much time after Barr Camp!

Any Other Stuff:
Once again, thank you to all the volunteers who make this race a reality every year. If I weren’t so breathless running I would say thank you more often.

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William Keller reports:
Distance: 13.3
Goal: 4:00
Results: 4:31

General Summary:
Started strong, slowed with GI issues, puked a lot, death march, recovered, then finished strong. Ouch.

Things Done Right:
Trained well at altitude in advance. Had run a casual 3:59 three weeks prior to the race, so felt good about the ability to beat that pretty easily. Ate what had been working for me in training before the race. Used gels I had used in training. Good taper. Plenty of heat training and good performance at BTMR left me ready to go.

During the race I pushed **hard** through a wall of illness (see things done wrong) to emerge on the other side and finish strong. Unfortunately it cost me a lot of time and positions. There was no time I thought DNF — tried to keep positive as much as possible.

Things Done Wrong:
Had severe sinus infection the week before and had to resort to antibiotics to get that gone. Decided to use 1 water bottle in a waist pack and refill at aid stations, rather than take the weight penalty and run self supported. I was drinking enough water (20 oz/hr for me in the heat), but still couldn't get over the virulently ill feeling in my gut. More than once I thought I had bad water somehow...that was the only thing I could put my finger on. I had trained a lot in hot weather at distance and altitude, so I knew my hydration needs pretty well.

Comments on Calculator:
Calc is accurate for my ability and pace.

Any Other Stuff:
I was sick to my stomach by Bob’s Road and puking at and above A-frame. Dehydration from the subsequent fluid loss led to the shuffle and sit between A frame and Cirque. Was desperate for H2O between A frame and Cirque. It was mentally going nuts watching all those people go by and I kept trying to tag onto the end of a train with no luck. At Cirque aid I drank a LOT (15 or so cups) and was reborn leaving out of there. Jogged and ran strong to the finish everywhere I wasn't climbing in the 16GS. Post-race I just have to laugh at this point and know my 3:30 next year will look like I did something amazing, lol. Oh well, this was my first time and next year I’ll have all the wave one folks to keep me fast. I’m still not gonna trust the water, tho.

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Jim Mahon reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: 4:18:00
Results: 4:25:58
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/

General Summary:
Did better than I feared after the later snow melt than last year, which resulted in less time training at the top.

Things Done Right:
Worked as hard as possible on the top after starting the 5 Sunday runs in July from the start line.

Things Done Wrong:
Need to win lotto so I can retire and make the Thursday workouts.

Any Other Stuff:
Volunteers did an awesome job on the trail and likewise whoever had the connections to obtain the almost perfect weather.

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Michael Quispe reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: Sub — 3:00:00
Results: 3:03:22

General Summary:
A short, quick trail jaunt up a tiny mole hill. :)

Overall I would have to say I was pleased with my performance although I fell a bit short of my initial goal of finishing under three hours. I felt very good pretty much the entire way up to about a mile and half to the summit where I experienced a few points of calf cramps.
I knew I was running fairly well when I came up behind Stephanie Jones who is a very strong Pikes runner. I figured I might as well tail her since I knew she would most likely finish under 3:00. Too bad I didn’t have the legs the last bit of the course as she put it into overdrive and left me in the dust. She at least kept me running strongly from A-Frame, up until I started falling off the pace. Thanks Steph!

This year I finished over 13 minutes faster than I did last year which shouldn’t be too surprising considering I planned very poorly last year compared to this year. Next year if I get in I know I can run much better.

Everything considered I’m still happy since in the overall Triple Crown Running Series I finished 11th overall and the 4th masters.

Things Done Right:
Ran conservatively from the starting line which allowed me to eventually pass quite a few people after the W’s and beyond. Hydrated at all stations as well as ran with my water bottle taking sips between stations. Took gels each 45 minutes like clockwork unlike last year where I went without gels the entire race and bonked very badly.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing specifically wrong during the race itself but could have done a good bit more runs at altitude along with some longer runs.

Any Other Stuff:
Congrats everyone! I also love the jacket and t-shirt. Great jacket and nice and light t-shirt.

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Randy Lindsey reports:
Distance: Enough but not too much
Goal: 3:45
Results: 3:44:16

General Summary:
Due to injury (plantar fascitis) I bailed early in the 2005 season and didn’t run with the club since. Once I got through the injury in late 2006, I just sort of felt like the club would take me out too far, too fast. I wanted to stick with my own plan.

So for this race I trained mostly on the Bear Creek / Cheyenne Canyon trail systems, running my own distances and paces. Actually, I increased my weekday running over past years, although the weekend long runs were somewhat shorter than my club runs would normally have been. I think the consistency did me good. In addition, my foot still pains me if I go too long, so this moderate plan kept me going.

I actually hadn’t touched Barr Trail since 2004, but with so many past years of racing and training I wasn’t really worried about it. My pace was a real guess — the goal of 3:45 was just a shot in the dark. I can’t even claim to have made adjustments during the race due to the pace calculator checkpoints. I basically just ran my best pace, and it worked out just right.

Felt great below Noname. After that my stomach tended to set the pace. It was very sensitive to my pushing just a bit too hard. Felt some hypoxia above Barr Camp, and seriously so above timberline. But it was very responsive to my pace, so I just kept things running right below where the hypoxia or stomach kicked in.

Things Done Right:
Ran like a woman. No, I really mean it. I noticed that men tended to come and go, whether ahead or behind. But I had more of a tendency to stick with the same women as we went along. I think (and another man agreed with me as we joked about this during the race) that women have more tendency to just run their own pace, and that’s what I tried to do as well.

Stayed away from Barr Trail for a couple of years. Well, not that I have anything against Barr Trail, but really, I do get kind of bored with the same old trails. One thing I really value about trail running is getting out to new places. This year I visited Almagre Mtn (took a nice fall there), ran up Peak 8 in Breckenridge, Sesame Canyon, Jones Park, the Sunshine Canyon loop in Boulder, and climbed (most of) Mt. Rosa. I also skied Little Italy on Pikes Peak, which was worth missing a Sunday run for.

Knew my family was waiting at the top. Can’t quit with that motivation!

Things Done Wrong:
I’m not convinced that running at altitude has much physical benefit beyond about 24 hours. I believe you lose most of those red blood cells very quickly. But there is a lot of value in training your mind to keep up the pace when you feel so bad. I didn’t do much of this. My pace above Barr Camp definitely suffered by comparison to the pace calculator.

Probably needed more long runs (longer runs, anyway), but I’m not unhappy with how it turned out.

Comments on Calculator:
I always make up a compact list of the calculator checkpoints for my goal pace, laminate it at Kinko’s, and tape it to my race number. This year I also threw in paces for 3:30 and 4:00 due to my time away, but the 3:45 calculator pace worked out fine.

I was 3.5 min ahead at Noname, 5.5 min ahead at Barr Camp, 3.5 min ahead at A-Frame, 2.5 min ahead at 2-Mile, 1.5 min ahead at 1-Mile, and 45 sec ahead at the finish.

I suggest adding calculator checkpoints for the Incline Overlook and Bob’s Road water stops, as I forgot to notice the Top of the W’s, and I missed the 7.8 sign although I was watching for it. The water stops are much more “in your face” during the race.

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Mark Jakusovszky reports:
Distance: 13.32 mi
Goal: 5 hours
Results: 4:57:38

General Summary:
This was my very first Ascent, and my first event in a VERY long time. I signed up as a personal challenge, to see if I could finish. My “stretch” goal got more aggressive as I started training and timing myself, but I was still very apprehensive about my performance on race day....

Things Done Right:
paced myself. I still started out faster than I maybe should have, but I didn’t have too much left at the end anyway. stayed hydrated and ate GU on the trail. Did not pass unless I felt I could stay ahead. Took advice from those that have done it before. Got a 30 minute massage afterward, to which I attribute my total lack of pain the next day or anytime thereafter.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough training, especially at high altitude. maybe did not hydrate ENOUGH, since my calves started cramping before Barr Trail. Almost cramped up totally trying to pick up a piece of trash on the trail. Also wore a cool shirt that I hadn’t worn before race day: it was too hot and chafed my skin!

Comments on Calculator:
The calculator worked great to help me set a reasonable goal and I was reasonably ahead of pace by Barr Camp. Unfortunately, babying my calves for the upper half cost me some serious time.

Any Other Stuff:
I thought (and even said out loud) that this was a ONE-OFF for me and that I’d only do it once, but within 24 hours, I’m already plotting for next year!

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Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 5:20
Results: 5:27

General Summary:
The altitude, especially the last two miles, kicked my ass more than usual for some reason.

Things Done Right:
Wore new knee brace. Seemed to make a difference.

Things Done Wrong:
Will wear sun screen next year.

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Trish Hagan reports:
Distance: 13.3
Goal: 4:15
Results: 4:18
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Great day, everyone was sooo nice!

Things Done Right:
Felt well prepared, ate and drank properly on the course. Read Matt’s course description many times including the night before--thank you so much!

Things Done Wrong:
Got stuck in the crowd of runners near the top--will get there next year!!

Comments on Calculator:
Was ahead of my goal at every point until and including 2 miles to go. Crowding slowed me way down near the top (lost 5 minutes in those last 2 miles.) Will add extra time for the top next year. Otherwise, it was terrific!

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 13.32 miles
Goal: under 4:15
Results: 4:34
Website: http://Pikes peak Marathon.org

General Summary:
Got up late due to thunder storms overnight set the tone. Many people’s time were very slow-- found out do to low pressure system .

Things Done Right:
Good taper to start. Carbed up and plenty of fluids.

Things Done Wrong:
Had a flat tire on Friday morning, spent too much time at Toyota getting fixed plus other things. Wanted to rest.

Comments on Calculator:
Use all the time--a great help

Any Other Stuff:
One if not the best aid stations in a long time. Good snacks and vols.

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Pikes Peak Marathon — Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO — August 19, 2007

Jamie McMillin reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: < 8 hours
Results: 517 25/29 Jamie L McMillin 63 Colorado Spgs CO 5:14:59 3:33:40 8:48:39
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
The heat started to get to me at about the 7.8 mile sign on the way up, about an hour and forty-five minutes into the race; I knew this because I stopped my watch instead of pressing the lap button, a sure sign that I was losing my focus. By the time I reached A Frame I was pouring more water on my head than I was drinking, which, of course, caught up with me between miles 2 and 1 and again between mile 1 and the summit as I threw up so thoroughly that I pretty much emptied the tank. While I tried to replace the lost fluids at every aid station, I wasn’t altogether successful as I had another wretch at the 2 mile sign on the way down and another when I crossed the finish line. While the paramedics had a little trouble sticking my vein, the 32 ounces of IV solution they provided me pretty much restored me enough to smile, yell, get my finishers jacket and head home a happy man. And, after reading this morning's Gazette, I realize that I was also a lucky one: I only fell down once on the way down and, beca use of

my gloves, I picked up no trail rash from it. So, all in all, it was a pretty good, albeit slow, day on the mountain. The only excuse that I can make for my not making my goal is that I last ran the PPM in 2001 and the intervening years have served to erase from memory how tough it is to keep up a consistent effort, particularly in the last two miles before the summit, because of the need to continually stop for the downhill runners.

Things Done Right:
For the first time ever, (yes I know about doing it on race day), I carried salt pills with me. So, when the muscle cramps from vomiting and dehydrating started to hit me, I had a solution. It didn’t take 5 minutes before the salt kicked in and I was painless. Also, as mentioned above, I put on gloves for the descent. This saved me considerable grief from trail rash. As far as preparation, I couldn’t have done much more.

Things Done Wrong:
Despite the slowing effect of trying to run amidst a crowd, I went out too fast considering the heat of the day. I know this because my time up the W’s was close to my best ever and that’s not good. Compounding the problem, I didn’t drink nearly enough water on the way up. I’m one of those people who, even on training runs, have to force the water down as I don’t ever get nearly thirsty enough to replenish what I lose in sweat and exhalation.

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Michael Everson reports:
Distance: 26.2M
Goal: Get to top before winner finishes/finish
Results: Missed by about 3 minutes/finished

General Summary:
Way too hot! Race was well organized. I don’t know why, but it was way more difficult above tree line than ever before.

Things Done Right:
Got in!!! Ran as many Thursday’s with IC as I could. Packed light: 1 water bottle with about 12 ounces of water and 3 gels up. Same for down. Made sure brother was on top to trade.

Things Done Wrong:
Got back spasms on Wednesday before race. Thought they were gone by race day. When I fell with 9.5M to go, they were back with a vengeance. It absolutely ruined my race.

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David Hatfield reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 7:00:00
Results: 7:09:26

General Summary:
Took planned breaks. Pretty slow on the last 3 miles due to crowding. Guess I need to get up there a bit sooner to miss the crowds ;) Felt great on the down. A lot of good people racing this year. Really enjoyed the chats.

Things Done Right:
Pacing, taking good breaks to refuel and hydrate, didn’t take water bottle/camel pack, ran ‘rabbit’ with a couple of folks which increased a couple downhill miles well above my usual pace (though I paid for this a few times as well).

Things Done Wrong:
Trained with my music though can’t use during race, not aggressive enough the first few miles to get ahead of the crowds, ran a down mile at 7 minutes then had to walk, walked 1/4 mile of last mile before could get my head on right.

Comments on Calculator:
According to my Garmin III, I went almost 50 miles! Not sure why the glitch in the GPS.

Any Other Stuff:
Staff were excellent again this year. Liked the use of radios/palm pilots to let staff cheer you on by name during the race. Very Cool!

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Pete Stevenson reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 6-7 Hours
Results: 5:48:49
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
What an incredible event!
This was my first race on Pikes Peak, second marathon, and (if you exclude cheating by driving to the top) my first ever fourteener ascent. I really had no idea what to expect going into this race and this just blew me away. The total experience was awesome. I had a great race and beat my stretch goal by 11 minutes. I will definitely be back again next year. I can’t wait!

Things Done Right:
I pushed myself far beyond what I thought I was capable of. Having a single water bottle wasn’t difficult to carry and saved a ton of time at the aid stations. Having my own water was a life saver on the stretch down from the A Frame to Barr Camp.

Things Done Wrong:
Between the A Frame and Barr, I fell apart and started having negative thoughts. The rocks were frustrating and I couldn’t keep up a steady pace. Once I got my focus back, I picked up the pace and ran faster than I’ve ever run. Being mentally prepared for the pain going downhill could have saved me a lot of time.

Any Other Stuff:
What a great group of people to run with. I was equally inspired watching Matt fly by on his way to another win as I was watching a 74 year old man cross the finish line.

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Vicki Martin reports:
Distance: 26 miles
Goal: 6 hours
Results: 6:34
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
This has not been the best training season for me so I had mixed expectations. I’m happy that I completed the race and came in second for my age group.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well throughout the race felt good on the ascent. Fell below A-Frame so felt a little skittish after that for awhile needed to work downhill some more, I feel missing a year of training in 2006 had it’s effects.

Things Done Wrong:
I wish I had worked on the downhill more, felt I needed to concentrate on the upper miles when we could finally get there so did more ascents than descents.

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Pablo Najera reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 5:00
Results: 5:35:11

General Summary:
Great challenge, Great race, Great runners.

Things Done Right:
Train Hard.

Things Done Wrong:
Not HARD enough.

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Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Finish
Results: DNF

General Summary:
Wasn’t my day. Dehydration (flu the week before) caught up with me early in the race. Had to turn around.

Things Done Right:
Paced correctly from the start.

Things Done Wrong:
Not volunteering this year.

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 7:00 hours
Results: 7:44
Website: http://pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Started out slow since being a Doubler. Picked up the pace at Barr Camp, felt really good until a bounder gone in my way coming down, also heat started taking its toll.

Things Done Right:
Good carb load and fluids.

Things Done Wrong:
More rest the day before.

Comments on Calculator:
Always use very handy tool.

Any Other Stuff:
Good snacks and vols, helping.

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Jon Magistro reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: August 2006 — Finish / March 2007 — 8:30 / Race Day — too nervous, I hope I finish in 1 piece
Results: 516 83/93 Jon M Magistro 40 Westminster CO 5:40:33 3:07:11 8:47:44

General Summary:
Hot! Hot! Hot!!!!

I won!!!!! I finished the hardest most rewarding race in America!! Yay me!!!

Having never completed a marathon before I wanted my 1st to be the toughest in America!! This certainly was all of that and then some. Did I mention it was hot this year? My plan had been to get to Barr camp using the calculator splits for a 5:20 Ascent then run a 3 hour downhill (+/- 10 minutes). I just didn’t take into account what a hot day would do to that plan, so I was 17+ minutes total slower than goal.

Things Done Right:
1.Positive mental focus. It was almost zen like for the majority of the downhill. I used tips from Matt’s book on system checks to keep your mind attached to the body. it worked great, although it took a little more than the top 2 miles to really settle into it after being 20 minutes slow to the top. passing people really helps this.
2. I ran my race!! I was passed by about 5 people total from the bottom of the “W’s” to the top — that is pacing! and I passed too many to count on the downhill — this really helped me keep a great attitude for the long downhill. I used my HR monitor religiously and kept a very steady pace.
3. Ate and drank. I ate well during the race. A lot of gels and a granola bar at Barr camp. I snatched a few oranges at the top and at Barr on the way down too. I was drinking well up to Barr camp but I probably should’ve taken a couple of cups in at Barr and A-frame on top of drinking my bottle dry. I fueled excellently during the downhill.
4. Finished like a Rockstar!!! Dragging into the line would’ve sucked. Instead I finished on a dead run and was able to finish proudly in front of my family. The fans lining the street are awesome too. It’s nice to hear them cheering for just me, calling my number and then to hear my name get called. I am a Rockstar!!!

Things Done Wrong:
I broke a toe in late April which caused 6 weeks of pain and no running, but no excuses — I could’ve drank more on the way up at Barr and A-Frame. I just didn’t realize the difference the heat would make on my performance.

Comments on Calculator:
Right on track as always!!

Matt — If you read this, thank you for all you do to further this sport for everyone, not just the people in the front of the pack. Between this club, your book, and everything you do for the community I thank you very much. My success is not only mine but yours as well.

Thank you!!

Any Other Stuff:
The volunteers for this race are amazing. Almost everyone of them lied to me though — They kept saying I looked great! HA! They really did a great job getting liquids to us and the food. I am so thankful for each of you as without you I could’ve never finished this race. You are the real hero and we are lucky to have you.

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Tim Steffens reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: To finish in under six hours
Results: 5:48:50

General Summary:
I felt good! Not too shabby for my second marathon..ever! I can’t believe that I finished in under six hours. I was truly amazed when I came through the finish line.

Things Done Right:
Stayed hydrated and paced myself. During the last four miles I hit the gas and didn’t look back. I kept telling myself that I had run this trail a gazillion times! lol.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t cut my toenails down enough and soon they will be gone.

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Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 26.21
Goal: Age Group award and as close to 5 hours as possible.
Results: 75 3/46 CURT KRIEGER 55 MASON CITY IA 3:15:43 2:20:13 5:35:56 3rd in age group; 1st place award;
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/index.htm

General Summary:
I was very apprehensive of this year’s race as I have fought with “patellofemoral misalignment syndrome” for the past year. Recent training and trail runs in Colorado during the week before the race, led me to believe that my ascent would be OK but the descent would be trouble!

The start was a bit reserved for me yet I hit the first two check points ahead of schedule. I then settled in to a steady regime of passing when able and relaxing when there was no room. A lot my progress in the “Ws” left me in good position when the trail opened up and I continued to gain ground. I took the effort to encourage those around me as I was so happy with the splits we were obtaining! I worked for quite a while ,back and forth, with Sergio Arreola from Illinois.

Above Barr Camp, I began to feel stronger again and continued to gain many places. Soon I found myself working with Salynda Fleury (who eventually went on to win the women’s division) 2nd woman at the time and Jason M Van Dyne from Missouri. Above tree line, we were quite impressed with the view and kept encouraging ourselves to keep up the pace, even if I did lead us off trail at one point and began to climb over a downed tree that was across the trail. It seems I had missed a switchback!

After summitting, I quickly found my suspicions were true. I could not enjoy myself as in the past, when I used to run strongly downhill. Instead I nearly had to stop and gingerly let myself down as the knees hurt too much to stride out or bounce off rocks! I stayed steady, however, and was more than satisfied with my final time even though it was over my original goal at the time I entered the race in March.

Things Done Right:
Took advantage of what training my knees could take while building up to long trail runs in Iowa, eventually deriving a workout in which I could walk/run for up to 4 hours, two weeks before the event. I was well hydrated before and during the race. I carried a small flask of energy gel (I make my own for training and used it for every training run longer than an hour)and took it often during the race in addition to an electrolyte tablet taken about every half hour.

Things Done Wrong:
Unable to do any altitude training other than a few runs up to to 9600 feet and a hike up to 12,000 feet during the week before the race.

Unable to do my usual mileage build-up prior to this event because my knees were an issue... even during shorter workouts. No speed work and very little hill work.

Comments on Calculator:
Matt’s calculator is right on as far as effort-adjusted splits. For me, I find it difficult to say if having predetermined splits helps or hinders my race. I find the reassurance very encouraging if I’m hitting close to the numbers. However, I’m usually unaware of any shift in my pacing if I’m ahead (I just figure I’m having a great race and try to continue at the faster pace) or if I’m behind (I seldom am able to increase my pace to hit the next split). In fact, if I’m behind, I may find myself convincing myself to slow down even more since I’m missing the mark anyway!! The calculator is very useful to me in planning ahead to understand how this race differs from any other race regarding where you can make the efforts that gain time and help to advance up the “hill".

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Stephen Martin reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 6 hours
Results: 6 hours 10 mins

General Summary:
A very warm day overall, above tree line was unusually warm. Definitely happier with my uphill time as opposed to downhill.

Things Done Right:
Worked hard into Barr Camp and was pretty happy with my time, just 5 mins off from my previous marathon best. Times to A-Frame were pretty good, within range.

Things Done Wrong:
Endurance could have been a lot better on the downhill, however I can’t complain too much as I thought I would be walking from No Name on in to the finish.

More downhill work during the last month of training.

Any Other Stuff:
Great race organization. Good job to all PPA/M volunteers.

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Pikes Peak Double — Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, CO — August 18-19, 2007

Lars Duening reports:
Distance: 13.3 + 26.6 miles
Goal: Finish
Results: 4:44:45 + 8:09:24

General Summary:
Signed up for the double by accident (late entry to the PPM through the waiting list), I really didn’t have enough training to come even near my previous times, but I didn’t want to miss the chance to prove to myself that I could do it. With excellent weather, both races were a joy.

I didn’t know what to except on the PPM after doing the PPA, but to my surprise it was easier than the Ascent; I knew what to expect from my body and could plan the M accordingly.

My times were worse than I hoped for, but not too bad considering the circumstances.

Things Done Right:
Pacing. On Sunday it paid off that I intentionally took longer breaks at A-Frame and Cirque — the 16 Golden Steps were a breeze after that!

Goal. I primarily wanted to finish, so I didn’t let the masses ahead of me spoil my motivation.

Things Done Wrong:
Sunscreen. I totally forgot to put some on my calves.

Lack of training. ‘nuff said.

Tool old shoes. My shoes revealed themselves to be too worn out to give enough support on the downhill, the results are blackened toe nails and quarter-sized heel blisters.

Any Other Stuff:
Having potato chips and other non-sweet food at the aid stations is a great idea.

Sunday, right before the start of the race, was this moment when all runners were silent, listening to the rendition of ‘America The Beautiful’, while in the background Pikes Peak was lit up by the morning sun against a clear blue sky. That moment alone made it worth participating.

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Timothy Edwards reports:
Distance: Plenty
Goal: Beat cutoffs with Achilles tendon injury
Results: Day 1 4h22, Day 2, 4:45 Ascent / 7:40 Marathon

General Summary:
Hard to do well with aching Achilles tendon problems. Wanted to finish both races, making it my 9th consecutive Double and 10th consecutive Ascent.

Things Done Right:
Stayed fed, kept appropriate pace for Achilles trouble. Finished both races, even felt good enough to run full blast from Hydro down to marathon finish.

Things Done Wrong:
Tried to keep up with Glen Ash in prior race, BTMR.

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Leadville 100 — Leadville, CO — August 18-19, 2007

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 100 Miles
Goal: Finish under 24 hours; under 25, no injuries
Results: 24:09:13; no injuries
Website: http://Leadville100.com

General Summary:
Start in Leadville at 4am, run to Winfield, return to Leadville. Jonathon V had the beer cold at the finish line!

Things Done Right:
Ran smart; ran the first 50 miles under control; felt good at 60 miles and picked up the pace.

Warm day; hydrated and eat.

Things Done Wrong:
First pair of shoes through 60 miles brought on blisters on two toes; but they didn’t have toenails anyway.

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John Mills reports:
Distance: 100 m
Goal: Pace Neal Taylor to complete #10
Results: PR by 20 mins on my leg, Hope Pass

General Summary:
Great weather conditions. Runner was in better condition than pacer.

Things Done Right:
Trained on hills.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough training on hills — dropped by runner.

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Anton Krupicka reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: In descending order: win, sub-16hr, sub-16:30, sub-17hr, finish
Results: won, 16:14:35
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Earlier in the spring/summer I really didn’t think the Leadville 100 was going to happen for me this year. I didn’t send in my entry until the last day registration was open at the end of May because my left knee had been injured the whole month of May since the Collegiate Peaks 50 and I didn’t think that-even if I became healthy-there was any way I would be able to get in enough training to make Leadville worthwhile. As it turned out, my knee prevented me from training all the way until the 4th of July or so. However, once it was finally healthy, I trained like a demon: the five weeks before I began my one week taper for the race I logged over 1000 miles and many, many, many, hours of running, including one seven day stretch right before my taper that was over 36 hours and almost 240 miles of running, much of it over 10,000’. Consequently, I came into Leadville feeling like I was in the best shape of my life and that maybe I could really bust one out this year.

The Thursday before the race it was absolutely pouring rain in Leadville, so I spent a restful night in the back of my girlfriend’s car, which was good because even though it only sprinkled for five minutes or so Friday night, I ended up sleeping a max of about 30 minutes the night before the race - camped out in a tent in good ol’ Ice Palace Park in Leadville.

Race morning was cold and clear. I had a headache that had started the night before-just like last year-but I didn’t pay any attention to it other than to probably drink too much water. I spent most of the time before the start just sitting in the Provin’ Grounds coffee shop trying to stay warm. Even with nearly 600 runners in the race, there didn’t seem to be any real competition, so I went in with the plan of running the first half of the race very similar to last year-well, I planned ongoing maybe just 2 or 3 minutes faster in order to give myself the possibility of a sub-16hr finish if the day ended up going well enough.

Right from the beginning Joe Kulak (I think) and Scott Mason took off down the hill and opened up a 100 yard or so gap. I ran down the Boulevard in the dark with the rest of the front group just trying to go as easy as possible. Thankfully, it felt very easy, but I really needed to go to the bathroom. When we made the turn onto the road going past Sugar Loafin’ campground I finally pulled off and watered a bush, which allowed the front group of ten or so guys to put a little gap on me. However, I caught all of them and took the lead for the first time as I ran up the powerline cut to the lake while everyone else walked. I then realized that my headlamp sucked as bad as I thought it did even though I was using Kyle Skaggs’ (crew member and pacer), which had seemed to be super bright at the start. Oh well, this just forced me to take it perfectly nice and easy on the trail around the lake.

Because I was in the lead, I inadvertently went off the trail a number of times before Tabor, but after Tabor the options are nonexistent and it was very nice trail running. Two other guys-Josh Meitz and I think maybe Duncan Callahan-ran right behind me all the way into Mayqueen in 1:47:30, but of course, once we got to the aid station they all wasted a bunch of time doing something while I just ran right on through while Kyle and Jocelyn handed me a new bottle and some more gels. I dropped off the headlamp (there were no clouds to block the rising sun) and headed up to the Colorado Trail.

I had eaten two gels (one right before Tabor, and one right before Mayqueen), but had basically drank no liquids in the first stretch because it was so cold and I had to pee so bad, but also because the Powerade in my bottle tasted horrible. The adrenaline from the aid station made me run up the road pretty quickly, and I felt great on the Colorado Trail and had to verbally remind myself to slow down and take it really really easy. This I did, but my progress was further slowed by dropping trou’ about 15 minutes or so after Mayqueen.

The short climb up to Hagerman Pass road felt very easy and once on the road I had to continue to remind myself to slow down and really relax. Just as I was coming around the last switchback on the climb up Sugarloaf Mountain, the sun broke over the horizon so I took off my shirt anticipating an uncomfortably warm day.
The run down the Powerlines into Fish Hatchery was pretty uneventful-I just tried to take the downhill pretty quick but without trashing my quads. However, for some reason I started having some inexplicable negative thoughts. There wasn’t a whole lot of “race day energy” flowing through me; I just wasn’t very excited about running. Actually kind of bored, mostly. I was kind of disappointed in the lack of competition-but that had been expected-and I was sort of just uninspired by the course that I had run so much in training. Also, I think I started thinking ahead to the hours and hours of running that was still left and that’s always daunting (and a very bad idea) in a 100 mile race. Whatever it was, it was kind of weird. However, right at the bottom of the powerlines there were some spectators cheering me on and that helped a lot to get me out of my mental funk (I felt completely fine physically).

I felt great coming into the Fish Hatchery in 3:16:30 but was a little worried about my stomach and the fact that I wasn’t drinking hardly anything. Every time I took a gel it was with reluctance-I just wasn’t hungry at all for whatever reason. In training I typically take only 1 gel per hour, but here I was trying to get down 3 and at least 2 per hour. In the future, I might try taking more gels on training runs.

I took only a bottle of water with me on the run over to Treeline (instead of Powerade), and really tried to drink it, but just didn’t feel like it. I also consciously told myself to slow down and take it easy several times. I ran this section too fast last year and probably set myself up for such a crappy second half. It was nice to see Jim Kelleher out on the road on a bike. He asked me how I was feeling, and I replied, “Great!” because I was. At Treeline I switched back to a bottle of Powerrade from my crew and then just tried to run nice and easy. I remember thinking that the incline on the gravel Halfmoon Road seemed a lot easier than it was in training, but I was also worried that my legs were starting to feel tired too early. When I got to Halfmoon in 4:12 I was pleased with my 55/56 minute split from Fish Hatchery but (unnecessarily) concerned that my accumulative time to Halfmoon was too slow (about 3 minutes slower than last year).

It was dumb to be thinking that, but those thoughts set me up to have a pretty crappy next section of the race over to Twin Lakes. When I hopped on the Colorado Trail I just tried to run easy to the top of the major climb out of the valley, and it was easy, but it seemed to be a bit longer than I remembered. However, on the next flat and rolling section over to the South Elbert trailhead and kept on trying to keep a solid pace all while worrying about how tired my legs felt at times. It was really starting to get me down mentally. When I got to the trailhead and started the downhill into Twin Lakes I was not in a good mood. For a while the downhill helped quite a bit to make me feel better, but because I was worried that my split was too slow I kept on trying to go just a little bit faster than what I was comfortable with (I never push downhills in training…this might be a mistake) and by time I got down into town I was grouchy as hell (but happy to see my split of 5:31:30, which meant I’d run 1:19-1:20

or so for that section…pretty much course record pace). I wasn’t happy going through Twin Lakes. Instead of cheering me up all the hoopla there just pissed me off for some reason and when my crew asked me how I was feeling, I replied, “F---- tired.” My left hamstring/hip was really tight and I already had that little bent-over hobble hitched step thing going on on little step-ups and hills. I just wasn’t feeling it.

I DID switch to just plain water at Twin Lakes, though. I knew I needed to be drinking a lot more and I sure as hell wasn’t going to try drinking anymore Powerade (I’d barely touched my bottle since Treeline), and it was actually really sunny and pretty warm out. I left Twin Lakes determined to quit worrying about time and just run nice and easy so that my legs would feel better. So I did that. The meadow was really boggy and muddy this year. There was a new shin-deep pond we had to run through and then lots of shin-deep puddles leading up to the river. The river itself was flowing pretty good but only about knee to thigh deep-the part I’d been crossing in training was about 50 yards downstream and was neck-deep on me, so this was a nice surprise.

On the bottom of the Hope Pass trail, I still wasn’t feeling it. There wasn’t much pep in my legs on the initial incline, so when the trail started going up in earnest I just settled into a very easy rhythm and decided I would walk if things seemed to get too hard. But, Hope Pass ended up saving me. On the flat section on the first switchback I could already feel my legs hamstrings and hips loosening up (which is weird, my hamstrings usually TIGHTEN on the uphills) and then just ran everything all the way up to the Hopeless aid station in 6:40. The trail was pretty wet and muddy, and parts of that trail are pretty steep, but I gained more and more confidence the higher I got on the mountain, especially when I saw that I’d split the climb 3 or 4 minutes faster than Matt’s course record split.

Plus, I’d finally drained my water bottle for once and spent almost a minute refilling and drinking water at the aid station. I figured that at this point, getting rehydrated was more important than relentless forward motion. I hiked most of the rest of the way to the top of the pass because I figured I’d picked up enough time on the bottom of the climb and because I was trying to get some gels down (note: no more Vanilla Clif Shots in races-I almost gagged). I did run the flatter sections, though. I hit the top of the pass in 6:54 and then felt terrible for the first part of the downhill. My legs just weren’t into it. However, I decided to not force it and pretty soon I was running downhill with a lot more ease. But, god, I hate those steep downhills at the bottom of Hope Pass.
I got to the trailhead parking lot in 7:19 and then started the run up to Winfield. This was the worst part of the race for me. It was hot and sunny out, the road was unvaryingly flat and even and the overall uphill also put a damper on things. I was going slow. The whole time I just kept telling myself that when I got to Winfield I could walk a few steps and things would be better. My legs didn’t feel good and I was having a definite low point. When I got to Winfield (in 7:43) I somehow missed the chute into the aid station and ended up hopping the fence. When I swung my leg over the fence I was sure that something would cramp up, but nothing did-a good sign. Also, Kyle was rarin’ to go when I got there so I didn’t have a moment to even think about walking a few steps and we were on our way back down the road.

Picking up Kyle to pace me helped so much. I’d been inside my head all morning and now I could talk to someone and this alone made my legs feel a lot better. I drained a whole bottle of water just on the road back to the trail, but Kyle had two more bottles, so we were fine. We got to the parking lot in 8:04:30 and started hiking up the pass. Hard. We killed the bottom half of the pass hiking the really steep stuff and running anything that was a little bit more moderate. I didn’t see another runner until 32 minutes after I’d left Winfield, so I had a pretty big lead, but we just kept at it. On this climb I also started taking electrolyte caps for the first time ever because it was hot out and I wasn’t drinking Powerade anymore. In the future, I’m definitely going to go with the water and salt cap combo instead of sports drink. When we got to the creeks about half-way up Kyle re-filled the bottles in the stream, we hiked the next steep incline, and then basically ran the rest of the w ay to the top. There’s some nice moderate trail above tree-line there and this year I was strong enough to run most of it whereas last year I hiked everything. I felt very solid on this climb-definitely hurting, but like I had good energy to make myself hurt as opposed to being just completely blown out.

We summited at 8:56 and went right down the other side. I must’ve been a little out of it, because I was tripping on rocks a little bit right at the top, but pretty soon I was cruising. Then, I tripped on something else and completely fell off the trail and rolled down the mountainside. I grabbed onto a little shrub that I pulled completely out of the ground trying to stop my fall, and then somehow was right back on my feet and flying down the mountain again. It was pretty crazy. Everyone at the aid station kind of gasped and cheered because I had fallen in full view of them, but it kind of helped me to get my downhill legs, we hit the station in 9:03 and pretty soon Kyle and I were cruising down the mountain in the rain just trying not to bowl anyone over.

The trail was muddy and slick as snot from all the foot traffic and falling rain and we both nearly ate it multiple times on the way down, but people were great about giving us the right-of-way on the trail. The river crossing and puddles in the meadow felt great on my legs and I kept a solid pace while Kyle ran ahead to refill bottles and get more gels. The rain felt great, too. It seemed like it had been a hot race so far so it was nice to cool off some.

We got into Twin Lakes in 9:48 and everyone was telling me I had the fastest time to Twin Lakes ever, but I knew that simply wasn’t true: Matt had come through in 9:39. Kyle grabbed a jacket for the rain, but as soon as we started the climb out of town it had stopped raining and was sunny. We hiked most of the climb on the road up to the Colorado trail. There were some flat sections we ran, but it was mostly hiking. Once we got on the trail, though, I ran basically everything. Last year I had hiked almost all the way to the South Elbert trailhead, but this year I was much stronger. Kyle kept telling me to take it easy-we still had almost 40 miles to go-and I was very pleased to actually have an “easy” gear to access. Last year it took all my effort to keep moving at all at that point.

The rest of the way over to Halfmoon was like that. We’d run everything but the steepest sections of the trail and when I was running I wasn’t running nearly as fast as I could’ve been going-I deliberately took it easy. On the final downhill to the road we cruised and Kyle refilled our water bottles at the stream crossings…I was getting a lot of unpurified water in this race, but I hadn’t been purifying my water all summer, so I was fine with it.

We got to the Halfmoon aid station in 11:24 and then continued on down the road to Halfmoon. I felt good on this section and we ran a very solid pace through here, getting to Treeline in 11:46. It was hot and sunny when we got out of the trees, plus I just hate running on that asphalt road. As a result we slowed pretty significantly on this 4 mile or so section, but I still felt a lot better than last year. We got to Fish Hatchery in 12:23:30 and it was a nice surprise to see my parents there who had driven 12 hours out from Nebraska that day just to see me finish Leadville.

Kyle and I kept a solid pace on the road over to the bottom of Powerline and then began the long climb to the top of Sugarloaf. This is where I completely died last year, so I was curious to see what would happen this time around. We ended up hiking the steeper stuff and running all of the less steep inclines and of course the flats and downhills to get to the top of the climb in 1:01 from Fish Hatchery (I call the little road coming in from the top of the mountain the “top” of Sugarloaf). When we got to the top we started running for good, and fast. I was really happy with the way I was able to keep it going down this hill whereas last year I had to walk most of it because I was destroyed. On the Hagerman Pass road mile over to the Colorado Trail Kyle and I clocked a 7:40 and we had definitely slowed down from what we were doing on the upper stretches of Sugarloaf, so we were moving pretty good.

Once on the Colorado Trail things were even better because now my legs could benefit from the varied nature of the trail (as opposed to a flat, even road). All through here Kyle kept telling me to slow down and take it easy, but I was feeling great (as great as one can feel after running 80 plus miles, I suppose) so we kept cruising into Mayqueen in 14:11. My split there kind of surprised me-I hadn’t expected to get there that fast-and I definitely started thinking about trying to run sub-2hrs for the last stretch and get under 16:10. However, I ended up playing it on the safe, somewhat complacent side and Kyle and I basically just ran under control all the way around the lake, up the Boulevard, and into the finish.

It took us 48 minutes to get over to Tabor boat ramp (14:59), and then I split a laggardly 1:15 up to the finish (last year I think I ran that last bit in 1:10). It’s very easy to tell yourself at that point in the 100 miler (especially when you’re leading by so much and you’re going to run a pretty fast time anyways) that you don’t care about the extra 5 minutes or so that you could cleave from your time with a little extra effort and that you’d rather just run it in comfortably instead of risk pushing too hard and blowing up-but, somewhat unfortunately, that’s what I did. I was definitely tired and grunting and groaning with basically every step the last hour or so, but I was also definitely not going as hard as I could’ve or maybe should have.

I definitely remember not taking the downhill off the lake as hard as I could’ve and then basically just going into “get it done” mode the last 45 minutes or so into town. Overall time at the bottom of the Boulevard was 15:41 and Kyle and I hiked up the rocky little hill at the bottom while I took one last gel just to make sure I made it. Again, I was definitely tired at that point, but really I think complacency and a lack of urgency made me not run as hard as I could. Either way, I was very pleased with the race overall and really enjoyed the run through town into the finish in 16:14:35 (for a 8:31 second half)-especially finishing in the daylight. Kyle and I never even took headlamps at the boat ramp.

Afterwards I was pretty darn sore and tired, but there wasn’t any extreme soreness in my IT bands like last year. The next morning after another nice night on the soccer field we all drove down to the lake and went for a run---I did 45 minutes without too much problem considering last year I had a really hard time even walking. I know that I can still run this race faster, so I’m sure I’ll be back next year.

Things Done Right:
Trained really really hard in the 5 weeks of health that I had before it was time to taper. Emphasized LOTS of climbing and lots of altitude in my training.

Stuck to my plan and slowed down on the road section on the way out.

Picked the greatest crew and pacer possible.

Didn’t freak out when I got a sore throat the week before the race or a headache (and no sleep) the night before the race or when the headache didn’t go away until Twin Lakes on the way out.

Switched to water and salt caps to stay hydrated when I couldn’t stomach the Powerade.

Things Done Wrong:
Got injured back and May and stubbornly waited for it to heal itself when apparently all it needed was some manipulation from Dr. Leahy and Matthews over at Champion Health. Two months of training completely lost.

Didn’t switch to water soon enough in the race. I should’ve known I wouldn’t want to drink that stuff.

Didn’t have a bright enough headlamp, but that may have been OK because it made me run nice and slow. However, whenever I take a serious shot at the course record, I need a bright light for the section over to Mayqueen.

Didn’t give it my all from the top of Sugarloaf into the finish. Who knows, maybe if I’d gone harder I would’ve blown up and ended up hiking in the last few miles, but in the future I’ll definitely be interested in at least finding out and not having to deal with some minor shoulda/woulda/coulda’s. I say minor, because really, I’m very happy with my race.

Any Other Stuff:
Leadville’s a great great race, but I’d love to see it take the lead in trail 100 milers and start offering some incentives for top runners to come in and keep pushing the limits there. I applaud Harry’s second place finish and personal record for the course, but I REALLY shouldn’t win this race by more than 3 hours. There are plenty of great ultramarathoners in this country, and with Leadville’s history and tradition it could be an even more significant race on the circuit (deeper field, more media, etc. = more MONEY FOR LEADVILLE!!) if it would just offer some incentives for competition and maybe get some things on the technical side worked out--like having a workable webcast and some very easy, simple YouTube video coverage.

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